iPSC Seminars (EDDU) : Multiscale 3D Analysis of Human Brain Organoids for Quantitative Tissue Biology in Development and Disease

Event

Registration via Eventbrite.

Speaker : Alex Albanese, PhD

Boston Children’s Hospital, USA

Talk abstract: Brain organoids can be grown from patient-derived stem cells to model human cortical development and dysfunction. These 3D organoids produce a variety of neurons and glia that self-organize into architectures resembling the human brain. Comprehensive quantification of cell populations and emergent features is essential in assessing complex tissue-level phenotypes. Here, I will present our progress in volumetric imaging and multiscale analysis of antibody-labeled organoids. The SCOUT pipeline includes automated analysis of single-cells, their microenvironment, ventricles and tissue patterns to provide quantitative phenotyping of brain development and Zika virus infection. Comprehensive analysis enabled detection of rare events and the discovery of new phenotypic features, which may improve the detection and treatment of disease.


The iPSC Seminar Series at The Neuro

Supported by Healthy Brains for Healthy Lives and STEMCELL Technologies, The Neuro’s iPSC Seminar Series welcomes trainees and senior scientists working with induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to present their cutting-edge research. The Seminar Series intends to foster collaborations within the network of laboratories working with iPSCs in Montreal, Canada and around the world.

If you, or someone you know, would be interested in presenting please contact us to secure a spot on the schedule.

Contact Information

Contact: 
Irina Shlaifer
Organization: 
Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital
Email: 
irina.shlaifer [at] mcgill.ca

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The Neuro is a McGill research and teaching institute; delivering high quality patient care, as part of the Neuroscience Mission of the McGill University Health Centre. We are proud to be a Killam Institution, supported by the Killam Trusts.

 

 

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