The Canadian Light Source: A Facility for Agriculture and Environmental Research

Event

Raymond Building R3-043, 21111 Lakeshore Road, St Anne de Bellevue, QC, H9X 3V9, CA

We are pleased to host Prof. Gianluigi Botton, Scientific Director of the Canadian Light Source, for a special seminar on Thursday, Dec 12. The seminar will highlight how the tools available at the CLS can be used in the research areas of agriculture, food and environmental sciences.

If you would like to meet Prof. Botton after the seminar, please contact Youssef Chebli (youssef.chebli [at] mcgill.ca). A few spots are available and will be attributed on a first come first served basis.

The Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been operational for the last 15 years. Since the first beamlines were designed and first results were produced, the research has evolved from areas traditionally associated to fundamental physics, structural biology and applied chemistry to research in agriculture and environment. The CLS has, over the last five years, picked Agriculture and Environment as two of the priority areas and has developed capabilities to support the users from those fields of activities. In this presentation, a review of the beamline capabilities at the CLS is presented with several examples focused on 3D imaging, spectroscopy on plants, soils and mapping of trace elements in organisms. The applications highlight the powerful arsenal of tools available to researchers at the MacDonald campus for solving characterization problems. Highlights of plans for the development of the next generation photon source in Canada will be discussed.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Gianluigi Botton received his PhD in Materials Engineering from Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal. He was Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy at the University of Cambridge. He became professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at McMaster University where he holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Electron Microscopy of Nanoscale Materials. He is Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America and the Royal Society of Canada. He established the Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy-CCEM. In May 2019, he became the Science Director of the Canadian Light Source, the largest scientific research facility in Canada.