McGill Global Health Scholars - Undergraduate Program

Photo of 2018 Global Health Scholar Tiffany Paradis

Meet Tiffany, 2018 Global Health Scholar

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Meet Harry, 2017 Global Health Scholar

Photo of Nardin Farag

Meet Nardin, 2019 Global Health Scholar

GHP is now accepting applications for the 2021 Global Health Scholars – Undergraduates program! The deadline to apply is February 17, 2021. Please read the information below. Review the FAQ page for more on the program.

Background

The McGill Global Health Scholars – Undergraduates program provides opportunities for McGill undergraduate students to gain global health experience through hands-on involvement in global health research projects. Scholars carry out their assigned role on their designated global health research project during the summer either locally/remotely, internationally, or in Northern Canada. Each scholars’ work is carried out under the mentorship and supervision of a McGill faculty member or a partner institution. During the academic year, Global Health Scholars benefit from a variety of training and networking opportunities organized by Global Health Programs (GHP). This includes the Insight Nights seminar series organized specifically for undergraduate Global Health Scholars, the McGill Summer Institute in Infectious Diseases and Global Health, GHP’s annual Global Health Night and other events and opportunities.

Key Dates
  • Launch of call for student applications: January 15, 2021
  • Info Session Webinar: January 21, 2021 (scroll down to view webinar)
  • Application deadline: February 17, 2021
  • Announcement of results: March 31, 2021
Program Timeline
  • Orientation Training: April 2021 
  • Summer Research Project: May 1, 2021 - August 31, 2021
  • Debrief Meeting: September 2021 
  • Insight Nights Seminar Series: October 2021 - March 2022
  • Final Report and Survey: October 2021
  • Global Health Night:  November 2021
Eligibility Criteria

In order to be eligible to apply for the Global Health Scholars – Undergraduate program, students must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Must be currently enrolled in an undergraduate program at McGill
  • Must not be graduating in May/June 2021
  • Students who have been part of a previous Global Health Scholars cohort are eligible to apply for the 2021 cohort, however they are not eligible to apply to work with the same supervisor or on the same project that they were previously matched with.
Funding and Project Hours
  • Students completing their project remotely or on-site locally (i.e. on-campus or in the Montreal area) will receive a stipend of up to $2,500.
  • If a student’s International / Northern Canada site work plan is initiated, students will receive up to an additional $2,500 to contribute towards costs related to international travel or travel to Northern Canada. If a student is not able to travel, the stipend will not exceed $2,500.
  • Selected students must complete 240 hours of work (equivalent of 6 weeks full-time). These hours must be completed between May 1, 2021 - August 31, 2021. The exact schedule is to be determined between the student and their supervisor. Any work on the project that exceeds 240 hours is not covered by GHP.
  • A student or trainee is eligible for only one award from GHP for the same trip.
Impact of COVID-19
  • Due to COVID-19 directives set by McGill University and the Quebec Government, it is probable that the 2021 cohort of Global Health Undergraduate Scholars will need to complete their work remotely. It is also plausible that students working on a project (that includes travel) may be able to travel to the research site location at some point during summer 2021.
  • All projects include a remote work plan as well as an on-site work plan for students.
  • Working alongside their designated supervisor, students should be prepared to transition their summer projects to remote work at any point if it is not possible to be on campus, to work from a McGill affiliated location, or to travel to an international/or northern Canada research site.
  • The on-site work plan will only be activated with GHP approval and is dependent upon COVID-19 directives set forth by McGill University and the Quebec Government. The GHP office will advise on which work plan to initiate by April 30, 2021.
  • Travel can only proceed with prior approval from GHP. GHP approval is dependent upon the directives set forth by McGill University, the Government of Quebec, travel advisories posted by Global Affairs Canada, the host country, and the onsite partner organization. GHP will assess the possibility for travel up to June 30, 2021. If travel is not possible by this point, students will need to continue to work on their projects remotely or on-site locally.
Conditions for Participation:

Students selected to participate in the Global Health Scholars – Undergraduate program must agree to the following conditions:

  • Selected participants are considered part of the Global Health Scholars - Undergraduate cohort for the academic year following their summer project and must attend various trainings, workshops and events coordinated by GHP.
  • Global Health Scholars must enroll in at least one of the following courses in the academic year following their summer project unless they have already taken one of them: 1) Interprofessional Global Health Course; or 2) PPHS 511 - Fundamentals of Global Health.
  • Global Health Scholars must attend a mandatory two-part GHP orientation session on research ethics training scheduled in the weeks following their notification.
  • Global Health Scholars must attend and present a poster at McGill's Global Health Night, to be held in November 2021 in Montreal.
  • Global Health Scholars who will travel outside of Montreal for their project must participate in online pre-departure training via MyCourses.
  • Global Health Scholars must communicate with their faculty/partner organization supervisor as well as the GHP office on a regular basis before, during and after their summer project.
  • Global Health Scholars must submit a brief report regarding their research project and summer experience to GHP, using a report template to be provided by GHP.
  • Global Health Scholars are eligible to attend up to two courses in the McGill Summer Institute in Infectious Diseases and Global Health in summer 2022 without paying the registration fees. If
    interested, please speak with the GHP office.
Application Criteria

All applications will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

1. Suitability for project 

The applicant meets the requirements specified by the faculty member in the call for applications and makes the case for their suitability to work on the chosen project.
2. Capacity for excellence The applicant demonstrates the capacity for excellence based on their academic track record, leadership in the domain, and skills required for their choice of project.
3. Suitability for program Overall interest in the student in the complete program (including trainings) and perceived engagement for the year-long program.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Applicants are strongly encouraged to read the Frequently Asked Questions page to learn more about the program.

Info Session Webinar: Thurs Jan 21, 2021 (recording)

Applicants are strongly encouraged to watch the following info session webinar on the Global Health Scholars – Undergraduate Program. You can review the presentation slides from the webinar here.

Deadline and Application Form

The application deadline is Friday, February 17, 2021Click here to access the Application Form.

Projects Available in 2021:

Each year the Global Health Scholars program offers a wide variety of global health research projects representative of the diversity found under the umbrella of global health. Please note that projects are subject to change and may not be offered in future years.

International Projects
Non-formal providers and NCD prevention and care in rural Bangladesh - Dr. Alayne M Adams, Department of Family Medicine

Location: Dhaka, Bangladesh

Project Summary:

Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) account for an estimated 67% of total deaths in Bangladesh. The overall age-adjusted prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus is 11.0% while the prevalence of adult hypertension is 26.4%, with women bearing the greatest burden. These rates continue to increase, and risk overwhelming the formal healthcare system and provoking even higher out-of-pocket health expenditure (currently 67%). The most prevalent close-to-community providers in Bangladesh are Informal Allopathic Providers (IAPs). These unlicensed practitioners have no or limited training yet function as a trusted source of treatment in underserved areas. Our study aims reduce NCD burden by engaging IAPs in extending NCD prevention, early screening, referral and management services within rural communities in Bangladesh. Along with IAPs, the Bangladesh Diabetic Association, and Jeenon, a digital innovation social enterprise, we will co-design decision support tools to assist IAPs in delivering basic NCD services including referral to the formal healthcare system. We will examine the feasibility, acceptability and fidelity of the intervention for scale-up; test different incentive and marketing strategies for increasing retention of IAPs and NCD patients; and evaluate the effectiveness of IAPs in increasing early and correct diagnosis, routine monitoring, evidence-based treatment and timely referral, as well as intervention impact on patient compliance and outcomes. Formative research with IAPs and NCD patients is underway with a plan to develop and pilot decision tools with rural informal providers by the summer of 2021. A scoping review of similar interventions is planned so that lessons learned can be considered in intervention design and delivery.

Project objectives for student:

The student will receive an orientation to the Bangladesh health system context, the challenge of NCDs, and the implementation research project. Tasks with clear deliverables will be assigned depending on student skills and interests, such as literature review, and app and/or research tools development. Regular structured meetings will occur with members of the research team to discuss the progress and plans. During the final phase of their placement, the student will present the work they have accomplished, and reflect on the insights and competencies they have gained.

If travel is allowed, the student will have face to face engagement with the project team, and the opportunity to contribute to the co-design of research tools and protocols will enrich their learning.

Objectives:

  1. Exposure to challenges in global primary care delivery
  2. Understand the processes of intervention co-design and participatory research
  3. Contribute to formative research planning
  4. Become familiar with implementation research methods
  5. Collaborate with diverse stakeholders including researchers, digital solutions innovators and informal allopathic providers
  6. Learn the fundamentals of literature review

Technical Skills:

  • Experience working with databases and literature review
  • Strong writing and communication skills
  • Familiarity with qual/quant research methods preferred
  • Programming skills not necessary but could be an asset

Transferable Skills:

  • Strong problem-solving skills
  • Effective team player
  • Self-directed learner
  • Time-management skills
  • Cultural competency

Timeline: May through August 2021

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Malabika Sarker, Professor and Associate Dean, Director of Research, and Director of the Center of Excellence for Science of Implementation & Scale-Up (CoE-SISU), BRAC James P. Grant School of Public Health, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Made by the student with the supervisor's advice.

More information:

Alayne M. Adams is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Director of its Population and Global Health Program. An applied social scientist, her research addresses a range of demand and supply-side challenges that impede equitable access to primary healthcare in rapidly urbanizing low and middle-income countries. In this project, Adams is joined by colleagues at JPGSPH BRAC James P. Grant School of Public Health (JPGSPH) in Dhaka Bangladesh, and implementation partners Jeeon and The Diabetic Association of Bangladesh (DAB). Jeeon is a social enterprise that is leading intervention design and execution, including the co-creation of technology and incentive structures. DAB is a nationwide not-for-profit focused on the prevention and management of diabetes and other NCD risk factors through education, screening and clinical services offered through its extensive national healthcare network. In the project, DAB will provide in-kind support with provider training, NCD protocol development and referral and teleconsultation services. Malabika Sarker leads the JPGSPH team. She is a medical doctor, public health PhD, and implementation science expert who lends experience in implementation and mixed-method research, and large scale NCD-related projects. She is joined by Atonu Rabbani, an applied microeconomist with quantitative expertise in behavioural experiments, and Mehedi Hasan who is an expert in NCDs and the design and implementation of surveys and surveillance projects. Rubayat Khan, the CEO and founder of Jeeon, is an expert in technology-based start-ups, and working with the informal private sector, and will lead intervention co-design and implementation.

Related publications:
https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-020-09594-5
https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/9/7/e026586
https://www.bmj.com/content/363/bmj.k4905

https://www.mcgill.ca/familymed/alayne-mary-adams

Adapted Family Integrated Care in Uganda - Dr. Jessica Duby, Department of Pediatrics

Location: Jinja Referral Hospital, Uganda

Project Summary:

Despite increased coverage of hospital-based maternal and newborn care, the neonatal mortality rate in Uganda remains persistently high. An insufficient number of health care workers is a significant barrier to providing optimal care in Ugandan hospitals. For hospitalized sick and small newborns, their own mothers may be a vital but largely untapped resource to improve the quality of care. In high income countries, systematic efforts to engage parents in all aspects of their newborn’s hospital care, such as the Family Integrated Care Model (FICare), has resulted in improved outcomes for patients and parents. We are in the process of completing a proof-of-concept study that will test whether an adapted FICare program is acceptable and feasible in a Ugandan neonatal unit. Specifically, mothers will be trained to assess their baby in three ways; 1) check for danger signs; 2) measure their baby’s weight; and 3) track their baby’s feeding progression. In Phase I, we interviewed healthcare workers and mothers of hospitalized newborns to explore their perspectives on maternal involvement in neonatal hospital care. In Phase II, we will implement the adapted FICare after collecting baseline data. We will compare the maternal adherence to documentation of their assessments to the unit’s baseline documentation of patient assessments completed by healthcare workers. Maternal stress levels and readiness for hospital discharge will also be tracked. Following Phase II, we will work to improve the adapted FICare intervention prior to applying for additional funding for a multi-center randomized trial in Uganda.

Project objectives for the student:

The adapted FICare proof-of-concept trial is ongoing, and a large portion of the data will have been collected by Summer 2021. After familiarizing herself/himself with the trial, the student will participate in data analysis. Specifically, the student will identify at least one key research sub-question that interests her/him and use the data collected to answer that question. In addition, the student will participate in improving the adapted FICare intervention based on the results from the trial.

If traveling is allowed: There will likely still be some data to collect in the summer of 2021. The student will be involved in assisting our research nurses in implementing the intervention and completing data collection. In addition, the student will participate in data analysis. If data collection is complete, the student will also participate in improving the adapted FICare intervention based on results from the trial and subsequently pilot the next phase of the adapted FICare intervention.

Objectives

  1. Learn about the role of mothers in promoting neonatal health in low-resource settings
  2. Participate in data analysis, identifying one key research sub-question from the project that the student is interested in exploring
  3. Complete a short literature review about the research sub-question identified by the student
  4. Create an abstract based on the data analysis of the sub-question
  5. Participate in modifying the adapted FICare intervention for future trials

If traveling is allowed: The student will have the opportunity to be involved with local data collection and local piloting of any modifications that are made to the adapated FICare intervention.

Technical Skills:

Required:

  1. Strong writing skills
  2. Familiarity with Excel spreadsheets
  3. Familiarity with basic statistical analyses (ex: t-tests, chi-square, etc.)

Recommended but not required:

  1. Familiarity with Stata or SAS statistical software
  2. Familiarity with RedCap

Transferable Skills:

  1. Able to work independently and problem-solve when challenges arise
  2. Completes tasks on time with ongoing communication with the supervisor
  3. Receives constructive feedback well and looks for opportunities to improve

Timeline: Flexible

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Abner Tagoola - pediatrician at Jinja Regional Referral Hospital and co-Principal Investigator of the adapted FICare proof-of-concept trial

Travel and Lodging arrangements: The student will arrange their travel with their supervisor's advice and the supervisor, or a member of their research team, will arrange the student's accommodations

More information:

Bio:
Jessica Duby is a neonatologist at the Montreal Children's Hospital and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at McGill University. She completed her medical degree at the University of Toronto, her master of public health at the University of Waterloo and a global health fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. Her research focuses on health care delivery for sick and small newborns in resource-limited settings. Specifically, she is interested in understanding how initiatives by parents and lay health workers can complement the care provided by nurses and doctors in low-income environments. The main objective is to improve the quality of community-based and hospital-based newborn care for underserved populations.

Publications Related to the Project Submission:

  1. O'Brien K, et al. Effectiveness of Family Integrated Care in neonatal intensive care units on infant and parent outcomes: a multicentre, multinational, cluster-randomised controlled trial. Lancet Child Adolesc Health. 2018 Apr;2(4):245-254.
  2. von Saint Andre-von Arnim AO, et al. Feasibility of Family-Assisted Severity of Illness Monitoring for Hospitalized Children in Low-Income Settings. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2020 Oct 8. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33031354.
Networks for Change and Well-being - Dr. Claudia Mitchell, Department of Integrated Studies in Education

Location: University of KwaZulu Natal (UKZN), Durban, South Africa

Project Summary:

This 7-year Partnership Grant project (SSHRC and IDRC) focuses on the global health issue of Sexual Violence working with vulnerable populations of Indigenous girls and young-women in Canada and South Africa. At the heart of the project is the question of what it would be like to study this critical issue and its solution through the eyes of those most vulnerable. The project focuses on participatory arts-based and media making approaches to identifying the issues, building in particular on artful productions such as photo exhibitions and Cellphilm screening to reach -- and engage -- parents, community makers and policy makers. The project builds on the idea of ‘girl groups’ (in some cases groups of girls and boys) in two countries, Canada and South Africa. The Canadian sites include BC (headed up through the Sisters Rising project at University of Victoria), Treaty6 Saskatoon, Eskasoni and Rankin Inlet; and in South Africa in 2 sites in Eastern Cape and 2 sites in KwaZulu-Natal. The internship will focus on capturing best practices and lessons learned, and showcasing the work and accomplishments.

Project objectives for student:

The student will contribute in activities related to the last phase of the project, including contributing to organize an event with partners on the field, identifying lessons learned, communicate successes and findings.

If travel is allowed: The student will mainly focus in organizing an event in South Africa with participation from all field sites and partners of the project.

Objectives:

  • Support the team in identifying lessons learned from the project on different field sites (Canada and South Africa);
  • Develop material to communicate findings, perceived change, sites biographies, achievements, etc;
  • Contribute to identify options for an online event allowing participation from all the field sites, taking in consideration challenges related to connectivity and access to technology;
  • Organize one or more virtual events with girls from all the field sites;
  • Support data analysis and contribute to the writing of documents and reports under request.

If travel is allowed

  • Work with our partner in South Africa to identify lessons learned of the project
  • Develop material to showcase the work done by Networks for Change in South Africa, assuring participation and approval from our partner.
  • Support the organization of Imbizo Intergenerational event, coordinating activities onsite and possible remote activities. The event includes the participation of girls and young-women from Canada and South Africa
  • Brainstorm with our partner ways that share knowledge with other field sites and learn from each other, considering different scenarios: on site, remotely, offline.
  • Plan and mount an exhibition with the field site and adapt it so it can travel to different locations or be shared virtually.

Technical Skills:

Experience with Canva or InDesign; with the use of social media to promote or share knowledge; cross-cultural skills; experience working with Indigenous communities and adapting to their culture and way of work; knowledge of Gender-Based Violence, its causes and consequences; facility to search, analyze information, and write reports or articles; knowledge of arts-based methods.

Transferable Skills:

  • Motivation
  • Adaptability
  • Capable to work on adversity and with diverse teams
  • Creativity
  • Organization skills

Timeline: To determine with the student between May to August. Ideally May and June.

Onsite supervisor(s): Prof. Relebohile Moletsane, Co-PI of Networks for Change and Well-being, Faculty member at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa

Travel and Lodging arrangements: The supevisor or a member of their research team will arrange travel and accommodation for the student

More information:

Claudia Mitchell: https://www.mcgill.ca/dise/claudia-mitchell
Area of Expertise: Participatory Arts-based methods in Global Health, Sexual and Gender-Based Violence.
Project website: http://www.networks4change.ca/
Participatory Cultures Lab website: https://participatorycultureslab.com/
Relevant publications related to the project:

  • Mitchell, C., & Moletsane, R. (Eds.). (2018). Disrupting shameful legacies: Girls and young women speaking back through the arts to address sexual violence. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill-Sense.
  • Gonick M, Vanner C, Mitchell C, Dugal A. ‘We Want Freedom Not Just Safety’: Biography of a Girlfesto as a Strategic Tool in Youth Activism. YOUNG. October 2020. doi:10.1177/1103308820937598
  • Haffejee, S., Treffry-Goatley, A., Wiebesiek, L., & Mkhize, N. (2020). Negotiating Girl-led Advocacy, Girlhood Studies, 13(2), 18-34. https://doi.org/10.3167/ghs.2020.130204.
Implementation of point-of-care Ultrasound (POCUS) in Two University-affiliated Medical Centers in Northern Ethiopia - Dr. Louise Pilote, Department of Medicine

Location: Hospitals of Gondar and Mekelle in Ethiopia

Project Summary:

Our project is to implement a point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) curriculum in two university affiliated referral centres in Northern Ethiopia. We have chosen two hospitals, one in Gondar and the other one in Mekelle as our host hospitals. They both train medical residents and both of them have training programs that do not include POCUS. We are currently assessing their needs in terms of ultrasound teaching and will be at the stage of curriculum building by spring. Once the curriculum is ready, we plan to either travel to Ethiopia to deliver the teaching in person or to do it remotely if the pandemic or political situation in Ethiopia does not allow us to go. We will then measure the efficacy of the teaching program and it's impact on patient outcomes.

Project objectives for student:

We will be building a teaching curriculum for point-of-care ultrasound in low-resource setting, in this case Ethiopia. We will need help building didactic material, OSCEs and educationnal videos. We also plan on travelling to Ethiopia during the summer of 2021 but both the pandemic and political situation in Ethiopia may force us to work entirely remotely. If travel if possible and if the student is interested, her or his role during the trip would be to participate in teaching in whichever area she or he is comfortable, help administer pre- and post-training evaluations and help administer OSCEs.

During the spring and summer, we will need help to build didactic material, OSCEs and educational videos. The student's role will be to read on specific POCUS related subjects and build, for example, a 1h teaching on that subject.

If travel is allowed: First, if we were to go to Ethiopia, the role of the student would be to teach certain parts of the curriculum that he or she is comfortable with and administer pre- and post-training evaluations.

Objectives:

1. Discover Ethiopia, its politics, its health care system and its struggles
2. Lean about point-of-care ultrasound and its uses in low- middle-income countries
3. Learn about remote delivery of global health
4. Learn to build culturally adapted didactic material
5. Learn the basis of qualitative and quantitative research

Technical Skills:

  • Comfort with word, excel and power-point
  • Must speak, read and write English at a very good level

Transferable Skills:

  • Cultural sensitivity
  • Rigor (work ethic), Self-motivation,
  • Discipline

Timeline: Flexible, may start earlier and complete later, very flexible during the summer if the student wants to take vacation there is no problem spreading the hours over the course of the following semester

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Jonathan Houle, 5th year resident completing his sub-specialty in general internal medicine

Travel and Lodging arrangements: The supervisor or a member of their research team will arrange travel and accommodation for the student

More information:

Project website: www.pocusinethiopia.ca

Dr. Pilote's area of research is mostly sex and genre and cardiovascular disease. This is her MUHC web page with link to publications.
https://www.mcgill.ca/internalmed/dr-louise-pilote.

Translation in a Rural South African Hospital: Challenges, Barriers, and Implications - Dr. Kathleen Rice, Department of Family Medicine

Location: Cape Town , South Africa (National Archives) and Grahamstown, Eastern Cape, South Africa (Cory Library)

Project Summary:

This study aims to identify barriers to effective communication between patients and care providers at a district hospital in the rural Eastern Cape, South Africa, with the ultimate goal of informing interventions to improve patient outcomes and care provider satisfaction through better clinical translation. This is important because clinical encounters in South Africa – and in the rural Eastern Cape especially – frequently entail language barriers between physicians and patients, and this is known to seriously impede good patient care. Accordingly, this exploratory qualitative study examines these processes of translation, guided by the following research questions: 1) What is being produced and obscured, both medically and morally, in and through translator-mediated clinical encounters? 2) How are these historically-situated and bound up with relations of power? 3) What problems, including medical problems, arise for patients and care providers as a consequence of language barriers and poor translation? 4) What are the challenges that translation in clinical settings entails in rural South Africa?
The study site is Zithulele Mission Hospital, a 147-bed district hospital providing primary health care services for a catchment area of 130, 000 people in the rural Eastern Cape, South Africa.

Project objectives for student:

If travel is not possible, this student will engage in an extensive literature review of the role of the health care system (including Mission hospitals) in projects of subject formation in South Africa. The student will receive training and guidance on this process, both from the study lead and through library services at McGill. The student will also assist with the analysis of qualitative interviews that were collected in early 2020 as part of this research study.

If travel is possible, the student will travel to South Africa to carry out archival research on the role of mission hospitals on subject formation in South Africa. They will also review general literature on this topic, as described under the Remote Work Plan heading. The major collections are to be found in Cape Town and in Grahamstown

Objectives:

  1. Gain skills in literature review
  2. Compile literature from the review and extract salient information
  3. Gain research experience in global health context
  4. Gain experience with remote archival research
  5. Meet regularly with the study lead and other student to discuss findings

If travel is allowed: There will be a greater focus on archival research.

Technical Skills:

Interest and experience with library research, and an interest in archival research. It is not essential for the student to have prior experience with these research methods. If travel is possible by the summer of 2021, the student would travel to South Africa so maturity and a commitment to non-racism is imperative. Clinical experience or lab-based research experience is not essential. Given that their role will entail archival research, this project may appeal to a student with a background in a discipline such as history.

Transferable Skills:

  1. Strong ability to work independently (this project involves archival research, which will suit someone who enjoys working in library environments).
  2. Mature and self-motivated
  3. Thrives with remote supervision (if travel is possible, this student would be based in South Africa while I will be based in Montreal).

Timeline: Anytime between May and August.

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Karl le Roux, MD. Karl, academic physician, affiliate faculty member at Princeton, and a collaborator on this project.

Travel and Lodging arrangements: The student will arrange their travel with their supervisor's advice and the supervisor, or a member of their research team, will arrange their accommodation

More information: I am a PhD Medical Anthropologist, Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine, and the Canada Research Chair in the Medical Anthropology of Primary Care. I have extensive research experience in South Africa going back to 2005, and have many friends and professional contacts in the region. Information about my program of research can be found here: https://www.mcgill.ca/familymed/kathleen-rice.

Northern Canada Projects
Youth mental health services in Indigenous Contexts: Learning from the experience of the Cree Nation of Mistissini - Dr. Srividya Iyer, Department of Psychiatry

Location: ACCESS Open Minds Mistissini, Cree Nation of Mistissini, Quebec

Project Summary:

ACCESS Open Minds is a pan-Canadian network that is developing, implementing and evaluating a transformation of mental health services for young people in 16 sites across Canada (www.accessopenminds.ca). Six of its 16 sites are in Indigenous communities, with one being in the Cree Nation of Mistissini (Québec). AOM Minds is called Aaschihkuwaataauch ᐃᔮᔅᒌᐦᑯᐧᐋᑖᐅᒡ, which in Cree means “providing help urgently when people are in need.” The ACCESS Clinicians have been providing services out of the renovated Family Resource Centre, which is equipped with various types of clinical and meeting rooms, even a kitchen, and is co-located with other youth- and family-related services (https://accessopenminds.ca/our_site/mistissini-qc-2/). A variety of clinicians, including art therapists, a family therapist, and psychologist, support rapid access to care through staffing the AOM space 5 days a week, with availabilities into the evening. The project has fostered ongoing development of collaborations with other services in the community – such as youth protection, social services, school counselling services, and the local medical clinic. This initiative has been important to the Cree Nation of Mistissini, the Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay, and key partners leading this project. There is interest in scaling up this project to other communities in the region. This practicum will focus on creating a description and evaluation report of the AOM program in Mistissini, and support the development of a scaling up proposal that takes into account insights from the AOM experience, stakeholder perspectives and available information about resources, preferences and contextual realities.

Project objectives for student:

This practicum will focus on creating a description and evaluation report of the AOM program in Mistissini, and support the development of a scaling up proposal that takes into account insights from the AOM experience, stakeholder perspectives and available information about resources, preferences and contextual realities. Student with work with Gregory Brass, site researcher; AOM staff members in Montreal and Mistissini and me.

If travel is permitted, the student will divide their time between Montreal and Mistissini.

Objectives:

  1. Learn about youth mental heath services transformation efforts
  2. Learn about youth mental health in a specific Indigenous context
  3. Become familiar with program description and evaluation
  4. Become familiar with development of plans to scale up initiatives
  5. Learn to work with different types of stakeholders - community members, researchers, youth, etc.

Technical Skills:

Sensitivity to and respect for Indigenous history, self-determination and perspectives, strong writing skills, prior experience in mental health and/or Indigenous contexts, experience in writing program descriptions/proposals

Transferable Skills:

Organized, respectful, sensitive to and willing to learn about and from Indigenous communities and partners, Adaptable, Willing to travel and live in a remote community context

Timeline: Flexible (may vary based on community preferences)

Onsite supervisor(s): Srividya Iyer and Gregory Brass

Travel and Lodging arrangements: The supervisor or a member of their research team will arrange travel and accommodation for the student

More information:

Srividya Iyer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and an Associate Member in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She is a licensed psychologist and a Researcher at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. Her work focuses on youth mental health and early intervention, including for complex mental health problems such as psychosis. She seeks to ensure that more young people worldwide have timely access to appropriate, youth-friendly mental healthcare and enjoy well-being and social participation. Srividya partners closely with young people, families and communities to influence real-world practice and policy in Canada and globally. She leads ACCESS Open Minds, a pan-Canadian network of 250+ diverse stakeholders that is transforming mental healthcare for urban, rural, Indigenous, post-secondary and homeless youths across Canada. She has been contributing to several other youth-focused services, research and capacity-building efforts, including in India, where she was born. Srividya has received numerous awards and was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists in 2017 and named on the inaugural list of Canadian Women leaders in Global Health.

Improving the Quality of Trauma and Acute Surgical Care in Northern Quebec: Quantifying Current Capacity to Target Future Interventions - Dr. Evan Wong, Department of Surgery

Location: Kuujjuaq and Puvirnituq, Nunavik

Project Summary:

Delivering trauma and acute surgical care to the population of Northern Quebec presents unique challenges. The sparsely populated geography, rugged weather, lack of resources and fragmented transport mechanisms all lead to difficulties in providing optimal care. Furthermore, epidemiological data from the region remains scarce. As such, the objective of this study is to quantify and evaluate the current resources in place to provide trauma and acute surgical care in Nunavik. Data will be collected by on-site evaluations of both Kuujjuaq’s Centre de Santé Tulattavik de l’Ungava (CSTU) and Puvirnituq’s Inuulitisivik Health Centre (IHC), as well as detailed interviews with local healthcare practitioners, administrators and logisticians. Furthermore, each of the 6 clinics in both CSTU and IHC’s catchment areas will also be assessed through interviews with local leadership and healthcare workers. Trauma and acute surgical capacity will be evaluated based on validated assessment tools, notably the Personnel, Infrastructure, Procedures, Equipment, Supplies (PIPES) Surgical Assessment tool as well as the International Assessment of Capacity for Trauma (INTACT) index. By filling a knowledge gap in the care of a neglected population, this study will identify targets for meaningful policy- and practice-changing interventions to ultimately improve outcomes. Ongoing data collection and quality improvement initiatives are likely to provide guidance for funding priorities and system modifications at the governmental level.

Project objectives for student:

If travel is not possible: Data collection would rely on remote interviews rather than on-site visits

Objectives:

  • To become familiar with trauma and acute surgical care in the Northern context
  • To evaluate resources available for trauma care
  • To evaluate resources available for acute surgical care
  • To interpret these findings in the Northern context
  • To identify areas for targeted interventions to increase capacity

Technical Skills:

  • Experience with data collection
  • Strong analytical skills
  • Strong interpersonal and communication skills
  • French would be an asset

Transferable Skills:

  • Organized
  • Adaptable
  • Completes tasks reliably
  • Good communicator

Timeline: Flexible

Onsite supervisor(s): To be determined.

Travel and Lodging arrangements: The student will arrange their travel with the supervisor's advice and the supervisor, or a member of their research team, will arrange their accommodation

More information:

I am a Trauma and Acute Care Surgeon, as well as an Intensivist at McGill University. I have completed an MPH at Johns Hopkins University with a focus on epidemiology and biostatistics in the context of global surgery. I was recently appointed the MUHC lead for surgical and trauma services in Nunavik. Please find a list of my publications at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=wong+eg

Montreal-Based Projects
Supporting ageing populations through connections: a multi-stakeholder digital platform to tackle social isolation - Dr. Alayne Adams, Department of Family Medicine

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

It is expected that seniors will represent a quarter of the Canadian population by 2030. This demographic shift is apparent globally, with the most rapid rates of aging occurring in low and middle-Income countries. In addition to facing loss in function and physical health, aging is also associated with significant reductions in social networks which leads to social isolation and feelings of loneliness, which are in turn linked to a range of adverse health outcomes. Moreover, this problem has been significantly exacerbated by recent outbreak-related social distancing measures. This project is part of a larger project led by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from McGill, Laval, and Sherbrooke Universities in collaboration with public health and community actors which aims to identify evidence-based and locally available solutions to tackle the problem of social isolation and loneliness in older adults. A particular focus of this work is the development of digital tools to assist a range of stakeholders in identifying service provision gaps and opportunities that take into account the characteristics of the population and locally available resources. Insights emerging from this project are of relevance globally, as a decline in the prevalence of intergenerational households is leading to many more older persons living independently, and exacerbating the risk of social isolation and its adverse health impacts.

Project objectives for student:

The students will spend the first week getting onboarded by myself and the research team who meets twice a week on zoom. They will also participate in biweekly experiential learning webinars given by our collaborating center, the McGill Centre for the Convergence of Health and Economics for additional training. Students will be involved in specific research tasks such as literature reviews on pertinent issues such as social prescription and social inclusion interventions. They will also be involved in the development of a database of local, national, and global programs in relation to the topic. Finally, they will be asked to write a short report on their work during which they will be trained in scientific writing and basic descriptive analyses.

Objectives:

  1. Exposure to digital inter-disciplinary and collaborative solutions for problem-solving the global health issue of social isolation and loneliness among older adults
  2. Gain an understanding of how to gather, manage and analyze data at multiple scales
  3. Collaborate with diverse global and local actors from universities, colleges, government, and community actors working together on action-oriented research
  4. Learn fundamentals of the research process including literature review, hypothesis formation, data analysis, interpretation, and academic writing.

Technical Skills:

  • Ability to conduct a systematic search of the scientific literature
  • Ability to work with geo-referenced, public, cohort, or health data
  • Some background knowledge in research methods

Transferable Skills:

  • Experience working with remote teams
  • Time-management skills
  • Attention to detail
  • Problem-solving capacity

Timeline: May through August 2021

More information:

Alayne Adams is an applied social scientist whose work addresses health inequities both globally and locally. In Bangladesh, she investigates the food and health systems of the urban poor and how to readdress inequities in health and healthcare. In Montreal, she is involved collaborative research that aims to converge health, food and social systems to meet the needs of the socially vulnerable populations, and overcome access barriers to health and health-related services. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine, and serves as Director of its Population and Global Health Program.

https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-020-09594-5

https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-020-09594-5#citeas

https://www.mcgill.ca/familymed/alayne-mary-adams

Addressing Diagnostic Challenges for Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases in Kenya - Dr. Sasha Bernatsky, Department of Medicine

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

Africa’s pediatric population will reach 1-billion by 2055, making it the largest pediatric-population among all continents. Poverty,malnutrition and infectious diseases strain available health care resources and compound the difficulties of treating potentially disabling chronic diseases like juvenile-onset arthritis and systemic lupus. If children don’t receive optimal care for these rheumatic disease in a timely manner, the subsequent disability usually prevents them from receiving basic education, and sentences them to a life of pain,poverty,&early death. Previous work in Kenya suggests insufficient training of healthcare workers and a greater need for better diagnostic accuracy related to pediatric-rheumatic diseases. Project-ECHO is a collaborative model of medical education and care management that involves the use of didactic lectures and tele-consults for medical students, clinical officers, general practitioners and pediatricians. ECHO can dramatically increase access to specialty treatment in rural and underserved areas by providing front-line clinicians with the knowledge &support needed to manage patients with complex conditions. ECHO could help bring rheumatology services closer to the pediatric population in EastAfrica, but is yet to be evaluated in this context. In the current proposal, we aim to complete some necessary ground work, first to update a literature review of published articles, and to review &summarize relevant ‘grey’ literature (e.g. initiatives relevant to increasing pediatric-specialty capacity in limited-resource settings). The student will participate in assisting with analysis of data from virtual focus groups conducted in Kenya among healthcare workers in Jan-May2021. If project is successful, the team will be well-positioned to bring this model to other jurisdictions in EastAfrica and beyond.

Project objectives for student:

The literature and scoping reviews can be done by the student at McGill. Dr Angela Migowa at Aga Khan University in Kenya is responsible for conduct of the virtual focus groups (with support of the Aga Khan Department of Population Health, and assistance, input, and funding provided by Dr. Bernatsky). The analyses of the focus group studies will be done by the McGill student in Montreal, under the joint supervision of Dr. Migowa and Dr. Sasha Bernatsky.

The student will conduct the literature review of published journal articles, review and summarize relevant ‘grey’ literature and evaluate data from virtual focus groups.

Objectives:

  1. To update a literature review of published journal articles regarding cultural adaptations of non-specialist healthcare worker-level educational materials.
  2. To review and summarize relevant ‘grey’ literature on initiatives relevant to increasing pediatric specialty health care capacity in limited-resource settings.
  3. To evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practices of non-specialist healthcare workers regarding pediatric rheumatology in Kenya, using data from virtual focus groups.
  4. With a senior team member experienced in focus group studies, the student will analyze the focus group transcripts using content analysis to determine themes emerging from the data.
  5. To prepare and submit an abstract for presentation at upcoming local venues and internationally (e.g. American College of Rheumatology meeting, likely to be virtual in 2021).

Technical Skills:

The student should have some background health knowledge (e.g. first year completed in a medical or allied health program) as well as some prior experience with qualitative research analyses.

Transferable Skills:

The student will require excellent communication and writing skills, and the ability to work independently with some supervision. The student should have a strong motivation to conduct research related to global health initiatives.

Timeline: June through August 2021.

More information:

Dr. Angela Migowa
http://ugaliyouth.org/profile/dr-angela-migowa/

The spectrum of rheumatic in-patient diagnoses at a pediatric hospital in Kenya
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28088248/

Frequency and spectrum of outpatient musculoskeletal diagnoses at a pediatric hospital in Kenya
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30604040/.

Ethics and the closure of humanitarian health projects - Dr. Matthew Hunt, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

Humanitarian action encompasses interventions to save lives, alleviate suffering and promote dignity of populations affected by disaster and armed conflict. Humanitarian projects are intended to be short term interventions to address acute needs, and transitioned to a development approach, handed over to local actors, or phased out when the acuity of the situation abates. However, a range of ethical considerations– and potential harms – are associated with how projects are closed. As well as loss of or diminished access to services, concerns include accountability, transparency, sustainability, responsiveness, inclusion, fairness and impartiality, amongst others. Though humanitarian organizations aim toward “ethical exit strategies”, a concept which has received some attention in the sector, there remains considerable uncertainty about how best to implement closure in often shifting and fraught humanitarian contexts. This uncertainty is in part attributable to a lack of knowledge about the legacy, experience and impact of different models of project closure for affected communities. In this project we are partnering with the Centre for Disaster Preparedness in the Philippines to examine ethical aspects of humanitarian project closure. The project has three interconnecting phases: 1) development of a conceptual framework, 2) empirical research in three communities in the Philippines affected by disaster or conflict and where projects are being or have been closed, and 3) co-development of training resources tailored for local communities and humanitarian organizations.

Project objectives for student:

The student will contribute to work related to phase 1 of the project, focusing on the development of a conceptual framework related to the ethics of how humanitarian projects are closed and clarifying obligations and scope of responsibility for justice of humanitarians. They will participate in the collection and analysis of literature from fields including development and humanitarian studies, bioethics, political science, and moral and political philosophy, as well as policy documents from the humanitarian sector.

Objectives

  1. Identify relevant academic articles and policy texts.
  2. Synthesize data sources and develop analytic summaries
  3. Carry out targeted analyses of specific topics related to project closure (e.g. obligations related to the transfer of healthcare data)
  4. Collaborate with other members of the team to develop a conceptual framework
  5. Participate in planning activities for the empirical data collection in the Philippines (phase 2 of the project)

Technical Skills:

  • strong writing skills
  • experience analyzing theoretical/conceptual texts
  • experience/interest in qualitative research

Transferable Skills:

  • reliable
  • creative thinker
  • adaptable
  • able to work independently

Timeline: May and June

More information:

For a general overview of our past work on this topic: https://humanitarianhealthethics.net/ethics-and-the-closure-of-humanitarian-healthcare-projects/
Two articles we've published on these issues:

Early intervention services for psychosis in low- and middle-income countries - Dr. Srividya Iyer, Department of Psychiatry

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

Psychotic disorders are serious mental health problems that have their onset typically in adolescence and young adulthood. Early intervention services for psychosis have emerged as a promising service model for the early stages of psychosis, yielding better outcomes for young people compared to traditional care. This model has however been mostly implemented in high-income countries. The model needs to be adapted to better suit the preferences and resource contexts of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We have been engaged in a program of research focused on the development of early intervention services for psychosis in LMICs. This includes an ongoing systematic literature review on early psychosis service delivery models that have been implemented in LMICs to identify core components and practices, and associated outcomes and impacts. We also have planned a Delphi study that will consult with patients, families, clinicians and other key stakeholders from LMICs to seek their inputs on what they consider core organizing principles and components of early intervention services for psychosis in LMICs. The Delphi builds on our literature review and a long collaborative program of research in psychosis in India since 2007. Results of this program of research have implications for mental health service development and policy in LMICs. Its innovation lies in bringing evidence and local stakeholder perspectives together in advancing contextually sensitive services design and research. The student will advance the literature review and Delphi study, helping analyze results, support background research, preparation of manuscript and sharing of findings.

Project objectives for student:

The student will advance the literature review and Delphi study, helping analyze results, support background research, preparation of manuscript and sharing of findings. The student will work collaboratively with other research team members supervised by me.

Objectives:

  1. Become familiar with literature reviews focused on the identification of core components for mental health services and adaptation of components based on context
  2. Become familiar with consensus methodologies like Delphi
  3. Learn about mental health services development for varied contexts
  4. Learn to communicate with different types of stakeholders engaged in mental health work in varied contexts
  5. Analyze and present findings in accessible and scientifically rigorous ways

Technical Skills:

Strong writing skills, experience in health services research

Transferable Skills:

Interest in mental health, Organized, Ability to work with varied types of stakeholders and team members based in Canada and globally

Timeline: Flexible

More information:

Srividya Iyer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and an Associate Member in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She is a licensed psychologist and a Researcher at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. Her work focuses on youth mental health and early intervention, including for complex mental health problems such as psychosis. She seeks to ensure that more young people worldwide have timely access to appropriate, youth-friendly mental healthcare and enjoy well-being and social participation. Srividya partners closely with young people, families and communities to influence real-world practice and policy in Canada and globally. She leads ACCESS Open Minds, a pan-Canadian network of 250+ diverse stakeholders that is transforming mental healthcare for urban, rural, Indigenous, post-secondary and homeless youths across Canada. She has been contributing to several other youth-focused services, research and capacity-building efforts, including in India, where she was born. Srividya has received numerous awards and was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists in 2017 and named on the inaugural list of Canadian Women leaders in Global Health.

A Systematic Assessment of Disability Rights in Disaster Risk Readiness in India - Dr. Sébastien Jodoin, Faculty of Law

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

Developing disability-inclusive policies is critical in the context of disasters, public health emergencies, and climate change (O’Sullivan & Phillips, 2018; Jodoin, Ananthamoorthy & Lofts, 2020). These tend to have disproportionate impacts on disabled people due to a failure to consider their perspectives, rights, and needs (Kelman & Stough, 2015). Indeed, while most countries have adopted national laws and policies to enhance accessibility and inclusion for disabled people, concrete measures to realize disability rights in the context of specific policy domains or at the subnational level are often lacking or ineffective (Lang et al, 2017). This project will shed light on the challenges, opportunities, and lessons learned with disability inclusion in the context of policy responses adopted at the federal and state levels in India to the covid-19 pandemic and climate change. Through a combination of systematic data collection and qualitative content analysis, we will assess whether, how, and to what extent different governments in India have recognized and protected the human rights of people with disabilities in the context of their efforts to cope with, and recover from, the impacts of the pandemic and the climate crisis. We will also run statistic tests to assess the relationship between disability inclusion in these public policies with key variables relating to the institutional, social, health, and environmental context of different states within India. Our analysis will yield original insights on the implementation of disability rights in the context of India’s complex system of multi-level governance.

Project objectives for student:

Under my supervision and in collaboration with co-investigators and collaborators at McGill and India, the student will collect and analyze data; program and run statistical tests; and contribute to drafting a paper reporting key findings from this paper.

Objectives

  1. Collect climate, covid-19, disaster risk reduction, and disability rights policies adopted by the federal government and states in India;
  2. Analyze and code these policies in light of a disability rights framework;
  3. Collect institutional and contextual variables;
  4. Run statistic tests on the relationship between disability inclusion and other variables; and
  5. Contribute to drafting analysis and findings.

Technical Skills:

Ideal candidates will have experience with mixed methods research and the use of statistical software R. Knowledge of India or any Indian languages is an asset.

Transferable Skills:

Organized; adaptable; and strong teamwork skills.

Timeline: Mid-June through August or flexible.

More information:

Biography: Prof. Sébastien Jodoin is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Law of McGill University and holds the Canada Research Chair (tier 2) in Human Rights, Health, and the Environment. He is also a member of the McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism and an Associate Member of the McGill Institute of Health & Social Policy, the Max Bell School of Public Policy, and the McGill School of Environment. His research focuses on two broad themes: the relationship between human rights and efforts to address complex environmental problems and the study of climate legal, policy, and governance processes in a comparative and transnational perspective. Sébastien is the author of Forest Preservation in a Changing Climate: REDD+ and Indigenous and Community Rights in Indonesia and Tanzania (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and the co-editor of the Routledge Handbook of Human Rights and Climate Governance (Routledge, 2018). His scholarship has appeared in top-ranked peer reviewed journals in law and the social sciences, and has been cited by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. A former Trudeau Scholar, Sébastien holds a Ph.D. in environmental studies from Yale University, an M.Phil. in international relations from the University of Cambridge, an LL.M. in international law from the London School of Economics, and B.C.L. and LL.B degrees from McGill University.
Website: www.sjodoin.ca
Relevant publications: https://www.ecologylawquarterly.org/print/a-disability-rights-approach-to-climate-governance/

How is policy incoherence problematised at the global level, and what are the implications for NCD prevention? - Dr. Raphael Lencucha, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy

Location: Montreal

Project Summary: 

Policy coherence across sectors is critical to non-communicable disease (NCD) prevention. In particular, the governance of commodities associated with NCD risk – alcohol, tobacco and unhealthy food – are governed across a range of sectors including trade, agriculture, commerce and health, with evident policy incoherence often contributing to a lack of action on NCD prevention. The inclusion of explicit commitment to policy coherence within the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) presents a potential opportunity to draw attention to the implications of existing incoherence between economic/agricultural policy and health policy for NCDs at the global policy level. However, SDG 17-related efforts on NCDs have primarily focused on increasing coherence in investment and development assistance – also critical to strengthening NCD prevention and control – rather than cross-sectoral policy coherence towards NCD prevention. This project extends previous work on the meaning of policy coherence for development (PCD) by examining the problematization of policy (in)coherence in the SDGs, and analysing the potential for situating policy coherence for NCD prevention within this broader priority of ‘policy coherence’. This project pursues the following research questions:

  1. How is ‘policy incoherence’ problematised in/by the SDGs?
  2. How are solutions to policy coherence articulated and justified in the SDGs?
  3. What is the potential for situating policy coherence for NCD prevention within this broader priority of ‘policy coherence’ in the SDGs?

Project objectives for student:

  1. Collect all relevant documents associated with the Sustainable Development Goals from United Nations webpages
  2. Develop an understanding of Carol Bacchi's WPR framework
  3. Use the WPR framework to conduct a qualitative analysis of included documents
  4. Draft a summary report of the findings
  5. Assist in the drafting of a manuscript for journal publication based on the summary report and findings

Technical Skills:

  • Experience conducting document collection and analysis
  • Knowledge of public policy and policy analysis
  • Ability to apply social science frameworks to document analysis
  • Strong writing skills

Transferable Skills:

  • Self-motivated
  • Ability to seek guidance and solve problems with others
  • Willingness to learn and grow
  • Motivation to explore the way ideas are represented in policy

Timeline: Flexible

More information:

This project emerged from a collaboration with my colleague Anne-Marie Thow at the University of Sydney. She will be working with us on this project. Both Prof Thow and myself have been working on the issue of policy coherence in the area of NCD prevention. We have been exploring how governments can take a comprehensive and coherent approach to the control of unhealthy products like tobacco, and the promotion of healthy products, like healthy foods. Our respective and collaborative research in this area can be found here:

Raphael Lencucha: https://scholar.google.ca/citations?user=rW68KPEAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao

Anne Marie Thow: https://scholar.google.ca/citations?user=LlzmJmYAAAAJ&hl=en

Leveraging testing modalities data to improve estimates of knowledge of HIV status in sub-Saharan Africa - Dr. Mathieu Maheu-Giroux, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health

Location: Montreal

Project Summary: 

Ending the AIDS epidemic begins by building efficient HIV testing services. HIV testing has, and remains, a cornerstone of HIV prevention efforts. A positive diagnosis entails that people living with HIV can receive life-saving antiretroviral therapy and, if the test is negative, people vulnerable to HIV acquisition can be identified and linked to prevention services.

The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) put forward the objective of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 by strengthening the HIV care cascade. The proportion of people living with HIV aware of their status is a key progress indicator and common bottleneck in the cascade. Tracking this indicator in sub-Saharan Africa is difficult, however, as surveillance systems are often incomplete. Our team has recently developed tailored tools that specifically address these challenges. Yet, current models are agnostic about testing modalities (e.g., opt-in, HIV self-tests, mobile campaigns).

The proposed project aims to analyze large-scale population-surveys and describe uptake of modality-specific HIV testing services within and across countries, with a specific interest in HIV self-tests. Surveys included the Demographic and Health Surveys, Population-based HIV Impact Assessments, and selected country-specific AIDS indicator surveys. This project is part of our larger ongoing efforts to guide global recommendations on how best to sustainably close gaps in diagnosis coverage.

Project objectives for student:

The student will analyze large-scale population-based household surveys conducted in more than 40 sub-Saharan Africa countries.

Objectives:

  • Systematically review survey ability
  • Assess comparability of survey instruments
  • Perform required descriptive analyses
  • Plots the results, visualize trends, assess determinants of uptake
  • Summarize results in a report

Technical Skills:

  • Knowledge of basic statistical principles;
  • Understanding of survey design and analysis;
  • Some familiarity with statistical software such as R (preferred) or Stata/SAS;
  • ability to read reports in French.

Transferable Skills:

  • Independence
  • Self-motivated
  • Ability to work as part of larger team

Timeline: Summer (but flexible)

More information:

Further information can be found on www.matmg.com

The following publication will give some context to the project.
https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.10.20.20216283

Examining dimensions of women’s empowerment among Ghanaian farmer households - Dr. Grace Marquis, School of Human Nutrition

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

The 'LinkINg Up' project is testing innovative mechanisms of working with government and private sector district-level institutions to foster sustained integrated support that will be transformative for rural women and their families living in south-eastern Ghana. The objectives include (i) to determine the factors that facilitate or impede women’s participation in farming entrepreneur associations and (ii) to test gender transformative approaches that improve outcomes for both women and institutional stakeholders. A recent quantitative survey tool, the Project-level Women's Empowerment in Agriculture Index (Pro-WEAI), was used to evaluate the impact of the intervention on women's empowerment. Supplemental in-depth interviews and focus group discussions have been used to collect additional qualitative data from women farmers and their male partners to understand the construct of empowerment in this rural region and the impact on specific domains of empowerment.” This proposed Global Health project will analyze these qualitative data as part of a mixed method study to examine the dimensions of empowerment from the perspectives of women and men and identify changes as it relates to the LinkINg Up intervention. The information from this analysis is expected to broaden our understanding about the pathways through which nutrition-sensitive interventions impact the empowerment of rural women and men, particularly in the Ghana/West African settings. The Global Health project is part of the thesis work of Aishat Abdu, a doctoral student in the department of Human Nutrition.

Project objectives for student:

The student’s role will include reviewing, coding and analyzing interview transcripts from focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. Training and the aforementioned work will be done remotely with regular zoom meetings with the project supervisor (Abdu).

Objectives:

  1. Develop and revise a codebook list of major themes and sub-themes from the qualitative data
  2. Code the interviews
  3. Analyze the emerging themes
  4. Develop a framework for the data
  5. Assist with report writing
  6. Become familiar with the Pro-WEAI tool and indicators of women’s empowerment used in the LinkINg Up project

Technical Skills:

  • Knowledge on gender/empowerment literature and qualitative methods.
  • Some experience with a qualitative methods software (e.g., MAXqda, NVivo).
  • Fluent in English.
  • Comfortable with reviewing the literature
  • Good writing skills
  • The student must complete the Canadian Tri-council online ethics training (no cost) before initiating research activities (https://tcps2core.ca/welcome). Submission of the certificate is required.

Transferable Skills: Good work ethics, comfortable working independently and with others, skilled writer.

Timeline: May to August 2021

More information: Please see https://www.mcgill.ca/nutrition/staff/professors/marquis

Addressing Health Challenges in Developing Countries: Innovation related to Neglected Diseases - Dr. Paola Perez-Aleman, Faculty of Management

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

This research project examines innovation processes to create health technologies related to neglected diseases affecting the poorest groups in developing countries. We study the changing innovation models to move from discovery to production and how organizations in developing countries build innovation capabilities.

Project objectives for student:

The student will provide research assistance with data collection, data analysis, and elaboration of synthesis reports based on the data collected on organizations, policies, and product innovation related to neglected diseases affecting the poorer population in Latin America, Africa and Asia.

Objectives

  • conduct literature review
  • collect data
  • analyze data
  • build case studies of innovation
  • analyze health and innovation policies
  • write reports

Technical Skills:

  • Strong writing skills
  • strong interest in global health and international development
  • analytical capabilities for qualitative and quantitative data
  • knowledge of qualitative data analysis tools (or eager to learn)

Transferable Skills:

  • organized
  • completes tasks well and on time
  • takes initiative
  • motivated
  • responsible, disciplined

Timeline: May 1 - August 31

More information: https://www.mcgill.ca/desautels/paola-perez-aleman

Children’s Worlds in Namibia: International Survey of Children’s Well-Being - Dr. Monica Ruiz-Casares, Department of Psychiatry

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

This study explores children’s lives and their well-being in Namibia from a child-centred perspective and it is part of the third wave of the Children’s Worlds, the International Survey of Children’s Well-Being (ISCWeB), a worldwide research survey on children’s subjective well-being (http://www.isciweb.org/). Forty countries participate in the third wave of the survey. Dr. Ruiz-Casares (McGill University; PI) and Dr. Gentz (University of Namibia, Co-PI) lead the study in Namibia. The Namibia survey was administered to a representative sample of 2124 children (grades 4 & 6) in Khomas region. The study assesses psychosocial, cognitive and affective dimensions of childhood life; satisfaction with the different institutions and spaces that shape childhood (school, parental home or family, leisure time and friendships, geographical location, and children’s life satisfaction in general and their aspirations); and access to material goods, health, children’s time use and children’s perceptions of their own rights. After the official launch of the Namibia report in March 2021, we will be working on dissemination of information to academic and non-academic audiences (including children) domestically (e.g., through research briefs, social media, and scientific articles). The Global Health Scholars will support this process.

Project objectives for student:

Objectives

  • Conduct descriptive and inferential statistical analyses of grade 4 and grade 6 datasets.
  • Conduct literature review
  • Contribute to writing publications on orphanhood, child supervision, and children’s subjective wellbeing (other topics to be discussed with PIs considering existing publication strategy and student's interests and availability)
  • Implement communication plan, including preparing research briefs, blogs, and products to reach schools and other stakeholders.
  • Support plans to scale up the survey

Technical Skills:

  • Statistical analysis knowledge (at least intermediate level
  • Working use of SPSS (preferred) or another statistics program, and EndNote
  • Strong writing skills
  • Experience conducting literature reviews
  • Skills in web development and social media are an asset

Transferable Skills:

  • Highly motivated and able to work autonomously as well as in a team
  • Very organized
  • Respectful of and thrives in culturally diverse contexts
  • Completes tasks and meets deadlines

Timeline: May-June, 2021, aside the 240 hours in the program, the student may join the McGill Global Mental Health Research seminar coordinated by the PI (date TBD but likely June, 2021).

More information:

Information about the PI and her work can be found at: https://www.mcgill.ca/crcf/people/faculty/monica-ruiz-casares
https://sherpa-recherche.com/expertises/projets-transnationaux/
and the Co-PI at: http://www.unam.edu.na/staff/shelene-gentz
The student will also work with a postdoctoral researcher in the team who was involved in the Children’s Worlds survey in Brazil.

The ISCWeB link is provided in the study description above and contains the most recent report as well as multiple publications from previous waves of the survey in other countries (Namibia joined in Wave 3). The Namibia report will be shared with the selected student prior to commencing involvement in the project.

Young People’s Participation in Mental Health Policymaking: A Global Consultation - Dr. Monica Ruiz-Casares, Department of Psychiatry

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

Our international team is conducting a scoping review of the literature on the participation of young people in mental health policymaking. This information is needed to guide and sustain future research and decision-making in this field. Following established frameworks, the results from the literature review will be validated through stakeholder consultations at the end of the review. Individual and group interviews with young people, policy makers, and adult facilitators of young people’s participation around the world will aim to confirm the findings, identify gaps in the literature, and inform dissemination plans. The Global Health Scholar will support this process.

Project objectives for student:

The student will be in charge of coordinating the global consultation and will join the team in data collection, analysis, and dissemination. Regular communications with PI and other team members.

Should there be unanticipated delays in the study, the student will be invited to participate in another study involving online interviews with clinicians, interpreters, and service users in Montreal and Quebec. That study explores innovative practices in service delivery through interpreters in times of health crisis. The student's role will be similar to the one described above.

Objectives:

  • Organize consultation meetings
  • Support online data collection and analysis
  • Contribute to the writing of results and dissemination of findings to different audiences

Technical Skills:

  • Experience with qualitative methodologies, particularly interviewing.
  • Familiarity with qualitative data analysis software (NVivo preferred)
  • Good communication skills (oral, written)
  • Skills in web development and social media are an asset

Transferable Skills:

  • Highly motivated and able to work autonomously as well as in a team
  • Very organized and attentive to details
  • Respectful of and thrives in culturally diverse contexts
  • French (and other languages) not required but an asset.

Timeline: May-June 2021. Aside the 240 hours in the program, the student may join the McGill Global Mental Health Research seminar coordinated by the PI (date TBD but likely June, 2021).

More information:

Information about the PI and her work can be found at: https://www.mcgill.ca/crcf/people/faculty/monica-ruiz-casares
https://sherpa-recherche.com/expertises/projets-transnationaux/

Ruiz-Casares, M., Tisdall, K., Constantinescu, T., Holtom, A., Molnar, P., Yamaguchi, S., Bentayeb, N., & Iyer, S.N. (2020, November 30). Young people participation in mental health policymaking: A scoping review protocol. Retrieved from osf.io/h5erx

Integration of Population-based Cohorts into Synthetic Ecosystem Digital Convergence Platform - Dr. Raja Sengupta, Department of Geography

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

The rising global health challenges are bringing to light many of the vulnerabilities of our current development model, and call for an unprecedented resilience at the individual, economy and society levels. Creating lifelong multiscale resilience requires the careful characterisation of multiscale mechanisms underpinning real-world behavior and contexts along the lifespan. For this, empirical evidence obtained across different spatial, temporal and functional scales ought to be integrated in multiscale computational models in order to guide science and on-the ground action towards sustained health outcomes.

To this end, we have developed, at MCCHE, a Synthetic Ecosystem (Syntheco), a digital ecosystem that statistically represents geographic areas of the world at a particular snapshot in time. With Syntheco, data from cohort and cross-sectional studies can be expanded into a full population statistically. As a result, empirical evidence from both real world-behaviour and real-world contexts can be incorporated into the same digital testbed, providing a unique way to operationalize these datasets for further analysis and enable person-in-system simulation.

This project aims to (1) integrate data in the Syntheco platform such as local and nation-wide population-based cohorts capturing omics, brain, biobanks, built environment features and health and community organisations and (2) assist in the development of online tools that can be used to generate interdisciplinary and multi-scale insights for researchers and decision makers to examine the population-level outcomes of different health-related interventions, and understand, diagnose, prioritize and target evidence-based action surrounding healthcare, food, consumer behaviour, diets and nutrition, and environmental, social, political and economic drivers.

Project objectives for student:

Students will spend the first week getting onboarded by myself and my research team at McGill Centre for the Convergence of Health and Economics. They will also participate in biweekly experiential learning webinars given by the MCCHE for additional training. Students will be assigned to tasks depending on their interests, and get involved in guided research tasks.

Students will start by gathering requirements for their project, performing a small literature review, as well as cleansing and mapping their assigned data. Students will then be guided to perform some early, exploratory analyses using statistical software. During the final phase of their projects, students will be guided to integrate the population-level data into the Syntheco platform and give a presentation on the knowledge gained in their literature, methods and data used throughout the project, and the new insights they uncovered during data analysis.

Objectives

  1. Exposure to new methods of problem-solving for complex global health issues through convergent innovation.
  2. Gain an understanding of how geo-reference and population-level data can be re-purposed for the study of human behavior, health, and the impact of public health interventions
  3. Become more comfortable working with data pipelines from end-to-end (acquisition to visualization)
  4. Collaborate with diverse global actors from universities, companies, government, and civil society working together on action-oriented research
  5. Learn fundamentals of the research process including literature review, hypothesis formation, data analysis, interpretation, and academic writing

Technical Skills:

  • Experience working with geo-referenced, public, cohort, or health data.
  • Some background knowledge in statistical methods, simulations and/or programming.
  • Familiarity with geographic information systems.

Transferable Skills:

  • Experience working with remote teams
  • Self-, project-, and time-management skills
  • Attention to detail

Timeline: May through August 2021

More information:

Dr. Raja Sengupta is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography & McGill School of Environment, and Academic Member at McGill Centre for the Convergence of Health and Economics. His research projects follow three distinct but complementary paths that fall under the broad umbrella of GIScience: agent-based models, spatial tools to measure anthropogenic impacts, and methodological improvements to existing GIScience tools. Within GIScience, the use of agent-based models (ABMs) for modelling complex biological and social systems is a new and emerging topic of enquiry. Further, the use of GIS and modeling to understand the impact of anthropogenic disturbance on ecosystems, and thereby direct policy, is an emerging area of enquiry. Within this broad area of research, Dr. Sengupta’s goal has been to develop GIS-based analysis and tools that spatially link disturbances with outcomes at the landscape level, with a view to informing policy-making. Finally, a third research trajectory focuses on improving existing methods, or creating new algorithms, to solve problems encountered with GIS in its current temporally static, two dimensional, database centric-form.

https://www.mcgill.ca/geography/people-0/sengupta

https://www.mcgill.ca/desautels/mcche

Producing and Using Global Health Research 1950 to 2020 - Dr. George Weisz, Department of Social Studies of Medicine

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

Research has been a key aspect of Global Health (GH) work since the creation of the World Health Organization in 1948-49 and its role has become increasingly central as the field has developed and more and more academic institutions become active in the field. The goals have been to use research to improve health worldwide but also to increase capacity for research in low- and middle-income countries. In this project, we examine how overall goals were set at the international level and how they were implemented regionally and nationally. We are especially interested in efforts to utilize competing social sciences to help develop priorities, manage programs and evaluate them. Some fields like Health Policy and Systems Research have defined themselves applied, multi-disciplinary domains that are closely associated with makers of policy while others like health economics have taken a narrower disciplinary approach. Finally we are interested in how medical knowledge is being utilized to standardize medical training world-wide.

Project objectives for student:

The student will work on specific aspects of my overall project. (e.g. medical education in Africa). She/He will be given a topic, an initial set of primary and secondary sources (in PDF form), asked to expand the bibliography and prepare 2 to 3 short reports on their research.

Objectives:

  • Examining the way research is carried out in specific regions (Africa, S. America, Eastern Mediterranean, etc.)
  • Examining the development of medical training in specific regions
  • Examining the role of social science research in Global Health and competition among various disciplines (economics; health policy and systems research etc.), particularly at the regional and national levels.

Technical Skills: experience with social science research methods; strong writing skills

Transferable Skills: completes tasks well and on time; motivated; can adapt to new research opportunities that emerge.

Timeline: flexible

More information:

George Weisz is the Cotton-Hannah Chair of the History of Medicine at McGill University, Montreal. He received a PhD in History from Stony Brook University and in Sociology from the University of Paris 5 (Descartes). His two most recent books are Chronic Disease in the Twentieth Century: A History (2014) and Divide and Conquer: A Comparative History of Medical Specialization, 1830-1950 (2006). He has also written books about the creation of French universities during the Third Republic and the history of the Paris Academy of Medicine in the 19th century. He has edited five collective volume including The History and Sociology of Quantification in Medicine (2006) and Greater than the Parts: Holism in Biomedicine 1920-1950 (1998). He has written articles on mineral waters, national differences in gynecological practices, and efforts at international standardization notably through practice guidelines. He is currently working on institutions of global health, and international trends in medical education. Among his articles on Global Health are: (With Alberto Cambrosio and Jean-Philippe Cointet), “Mapping Global Health: A network analysis of a heterogeneous publication domain,” BioSocieties12(4), 2017: 520-542; (With Noemi Tousignant), “International Health Research and the Emergence of Global Health in the late 20th Century,” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 93(3), 2019: 365-400; “What Happened to the Global Forum for Health Research,” Global Public Health, 15(8), 2020, 1212-1224. Web Page: https://www.mcgill.ca/ssom/staff/weisz

From concern to commitment: Learning to center Black perspectives in reconfiguring healthcare education at SPOT  - Dr. Hiba Zafran, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy

Location: Montreal

Project Summary:

Social accountability in healthcare education is a value and a strategy for global health. Ensuring the representation and sense of belonging of underserved groups within healthcare education contributes to capacity-building. This is just one component to redress the health inequities experienced by communities who are subjected to systemic racism. Diversity data within the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences unsurprisingly demonstrates the dominance of white students and the under-representation of Black students. The aim of this project is to explore and identify multi-level innovative approaches, strategies and barriers to engage in successful outreach, recruitment and genuine inclusion of Black applicants into healthcare education. This project is informed by critical race and decolonial theories, and preparatory resources will be available. Therefore, priority is placed on data and processes that centre Black voices in their intersectional multiplicities. The specific objectives are to: (1) review and create a comparative library of relevant literature and initiatives in the Global North and South, with a focus on innovative community-integrated examples; (2) conduct interviews and/or focus groups with Black occupational therapists (OT) who have graduated from the McGill program in order to understand their perspectives on choosing McGill, the admissions process, and the curriculum (academic and fieldwork); (3) map stakeholders and possible partners within the broader Montreal community; and, (4) thematically analyze all data for key elements. The required deliverable is a report or guide submitted to the committee chairs in the OT program, to inform ongoing equity and anti-racist actions within the OT program.

Project objectives for student:

The student will be responsible for implementing and conducting data collection collaboratively, participation in various team meetings, and providing a preliminary analysis and draft summarizing the data collected, analysis and recommendations.

Objectives

  • Create a library of initiatives related to equity and recruitment in healthcare education admissions for Black communities in both the Global North and South
  • Preliminarily analyze the review for key themes in successful recruitment initiatives/pipeline projects/bridge programming
  • Create/expand on a community map to identify stakeholders and possible partners
  • Conduct short interviews or focus groups with Black OT graduates as part of program evaluation
  • Collaboratively (with supervisors) draft a report summarizing data analysis and recommendations.

Technical Skills:

  • Qualitative methods (interviews, focus groups, thematic analysis)
  • Literature review across multiple databases and types
  • Bilingual
  • Strong writing/synthesis skills
  • Community experience with marginalized/BIPOC groups
  • Coursework or related experience related to any critical theories (anti-racism, feminist, decolonial etc…)

Transferable Skills:

  • Demonstrates ability to interrogate own bias, worldviews and positionality
  • Self-directed, autonomous, reliable and punctual and acts with integrity
  • Values power-sharing and relationship-building
  • Demonstrated interest and commitment to anti-racist work in any way
  • Facility in interviewing skills (communication, relatability, active listening, authenticity, note-taking)

Timeline: Mid-May to mid-July.

More information:

Primary supervisor - Hiba Zafran.
Website: https://www.mcgill.ca/spot/hiba-zafran
Co-supervisors at SPOT: Barbara Shankland, Chair of OT Admissions Committee & Caroline Storr Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education (OT).

Applicants: Preference will be given to minority applicants and/or with ties to Black-identified communities.
Collaboration: This project will occur in collaboration with a graduate research study conducted by a team of 5 grad students examining and redressing racism in clinical fieldwork in Quebec. They are supervised by Laurence Roy and Marie-Lyne Grenier in the OT program. Team meetings will intersect for joint learning and co-creation.

Projects with Partner Organizations
Canada Africa Initiative to Address Maternal Newborn and Child Mortality - Graham Atkinson, Amref Health Africa in Canada

Location: Amref Health Africa in Canada Offices - Toronto, Canada

Project Summary:

The Canada-Africa Initiative to Address Maternal, Newborn and Child Mortality (CAIA-MNCM) was originally funded as a 4 year project implemented by a consortium of experienced Canadian organizations including Amref Health Africa in Canada (lead agency), Children Believe, SickKids Centre for Global Child Health and WaterAid Canada in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania. The program contributed towards reduced maternal, neonatal and child mortality in 20 districts across the four targeted countries through an integrated approach that aligns with the Global Affairs Canada maternal newborn and child health paths on strengthening health systems, reducing the burden of diseases and improving nutrition. Supporting regional and district level Ministries of Health (MOH) and local governments, program partners worked to improve the supply, quality and demand for integrated reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH), nutrition and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services in targeted communities and health facilities. The original program activities including an endline study were completed in 2020, along with the roles for the project partners. Following completion of the original program, the program was extended for Amref Health Africa to respond to COVID-19 in targeted districts of Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi and Senegal, by supporting national health system efforts, and safeguarding the provision of critical reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health services for women and girls.

Project objectives for student:

The student will work on reporting template design, data consolidation and analysis, writing and editing.

Objectives:

  • Becoming familiar with results based management;
  • Report writing
  • Project monitoring
  • Proposal writing
  • Streamlining processes

Technical Skills: Experience with Microsoft office, strong writing skills, statistics.

Transferable Skills: Organized, independent and motivated.

Timeline: Flexible

Onsite supervisor(s): Graham Atkinson

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

More information:

https://www.amrefcanada.org/why-amref/expert-staff/graham-atkinson-programmes-manager/
https://www.amrefcanada.org/why-africa/why-africa/partnering-to-create-better-health-for-moms-and-babies-in-ethiopia-kenya-malawi-and-tanzania/

Global Health Scholars are supported by:

The Global Health Scholars Program is supported by the Knightsgrange Foundation. The Foundation supports all aspects of the program including mentorship by academic staff, summer placement on international global health projects, training events, and other unique opportunities. Undergraduate student recipients supported by the Knightsgrange Foundation are known as John Locke Churchill Scholars.

Leduc, Davis, Brun, & De Rito Undergraduate Award for Global Health - Established in 2016 by Francine Davis, B Phys Ther 1969, BSc(PT) 1985 in memory of, and gratitude for the support of Jeanne Brun, Gisèle Brun and Tony De Rito.  For outstanding undergraduate students at McGill University undertaking a mentored research project including an international component with McGill Global Health Programs, in the area of women’s and girls’ health. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs.

Dr. Kenneth Remsen Global Health Award - Established in 2018 by Dr. Kenneth Alan Remsen, MDCM 1980. To provide travel support and/or stipends for one or more outstanding MDCM students enrolled in the Faculty of Medicine who are participating in the Global Health Scholars program by undertaking a mentored global health project in an international setting, in Northern Canada, or from Montreal. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs. Value: varies.

Dr. Margaret Siber Global Health Scholar Award  - Established in 2017 by Dr. Margaret Siber, MDCM 1970. To provide travel support and/or stipends for one or more outstanding MDCM students enrolled in the Faculty of Medicine who are participating in the Global Health Scholars program by undertaking a mentored global health project in an international setting, in Northern Canada, or from Montreal. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs. Value: varies

The Medicine Class of 1965 International Health Student Fund - Established in May 2000 by the Class of Medicine 1965 in appreciation of the education they received at McGill.  Funds will be used to allow medical students to pursue research or clinical electives overseas.  One bursary will be awarded in each application round.

William and Caroline Krishnappa Travel Award for Global Health - Established in 2017 by Harriet H. Stairs, BA 1967 and Andrea Stairs Krishnappa, BA 1996, in honour of their grandchildren and children, William and Caroline Krishnappa. To provide travel support for one undergraduate student pursuing a global health project in India in the summer. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs.

Soe-Lin-Hecht Global Health Scholar Undergraduate Award - Established in 2019 by Dr. Shan Soe-Lin, BSc 2003, PhD 2009, Dr. Robert Hecht, and Hla Hla Myint Soe-Lin, in memory of Dr. Soe Lin, who was an ardent believer in the importance of using a good education to better the lot of humanity. To provide annual travel support and/or stipends for up to three outstanding undergraduate students who are participating in the Global Health Scholars program in the Faculty of Medicine. For students pursuing a mentored research project overseas in low or middle-income countries, or in an indigenous community in Canada. Preference will be given to students pursuing studies in Microbiology and Immunology. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs. Value: Varies.

Joseph I. Wolfsdorf Fund for Global Child Health - The fund will provide travel support for undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate students, and healthcare and allied professionals who are pursuing an elective or working on a global maternal & child health project at the University. Travel is expected to take place overseas in under -resourced areas of the world, or among underserved populations in Canada. Value: varies

Spencer-Hick Family Global Heath Education and Training Fund - The goal of the Fund is to support undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral fellows pursuing training, travel, fieldwork, research, and other activities related to global health. Value: varies.

 

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McGill University is located on land which has long served as a site of meeting and exchange amongst Indigenous peoples, including the Haudenosaunee and Anishinabeg nations. McGill honours, recognizes and respects these nations as the traditional stewards of the lands and waters on which peoples of the world now gather. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.

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