McGill Global Health Scholars (Undergraduates)

Meet Alexa, 2017 Global Health Scholar

Meet Harry, 2017 Global Health Scholar

Meet Jasleen, 2017 Global Health Scholar

The deadline to apply for the Global Health Scholar is now passed. Thank you to all who participated!

Do you want to write about global health? Have you ever dreamed of running a scientific journal? We have extended the deadline and are looking for new applicants for our three Global Health Outreach Projects.

The McGill Global Health Scholars program is designed to provide opportunities for McGill undergraduate students to learn about global health through research and outreach projects. Most Scholars are involved in research projects mentored by a faculty member, and during the summer the students help with global health projects internationally, in Northern Canada, or from Montreal. During the academic year, the Global Health Scholars will benefit from a series of global health workshops and trainings organized by GHP. Global Health Scholars will also have access to educational, professional and networking opportunities such as the McGill Summer Institute in Infectious Diseases and Global Health, the Consortium of Universities for Global Health Conference and Global Health Night social events.

Projects are announced each January and students are selected by April of every year.

General information:

What kinds of projects do you have? What kinds of students are selected?

  • Each year there is a wide variety of projects that represent the diversity of the global health field. We've had students participate from five different McGill Faculties during the last two years.
  • Students will be based in Northern Canada, internationally or in Montreal depending on the project and supervisor. 
  • Students do not need to have prior global health experience and specific project requirements vary a great deal. In general, we are looking for students who want to learn about health inequities and what is being done through these research and outreach projects to develop innovative solutions to big challenges. We are looking for students who see value in learning a wide range of skills, possess humility, and have the ability to be self-reflective. 
  • Jump to 2018 projects!
  • Click here to meet past Global Health Scholars and see their projects

What funding is provided?

  • Students will receive $5,000 for projects involving international travel or travel to Northern Canada. This funding is to cover travel costs and a small stipend.
  • Students will receive $2,500 to cover a small stipend for projects based in Montreal.
  • Students traveling outside of Montreal may ALSO be eligible for funding from the Office of Scholarships and Student Aid. Please review this document and if eligible you can apply after your selection into the program. The Global Health Scholars program has prior approval for EEO bursaries.
  • All research projects must be a total 240 hours of work (equivalent of 6weeks of full-time work) and must be between May 1- August 31, 2018. The exact schedule can be determined by the student and supervisor. For international or Northern Canada projects a minimum of 4 full weeks (28days) must be spent on-site. Note: Outreach projects will have a different schedule and this will be detailed in the application.

How do I apply?

  • Students apply through Global Health Programs for selection into the program. The immediate faculty supervisor is involved in final selection.
  • Only currently enrolled McGill undergraduate students are eligible. McGill students graduating in May/June 2018 will NOT be eligible to apply.
  • On the application, the student will indicate their first and second choices of projects from a list.

What else should I know?

  • McGill students are part of the Global Health Scholars program for the academic semester or year following their summer project and must attend special workshops facilitated by the Global Health Programs office (course schedule will be taken into account).
  • Students must enroll in the Interprofessional Global Health Course or PPHS 511 - Fundamentals of Global Health course in the 2018-19 academic year if they haven’t already taken it. As we are encouraging global health scholarship through this program, rare exceptions will be granted. However, students whose schedules do not allow the option of taking these courses can discuss with the GHP office and apply for an exception.
  • Students must communicate with the faculty advisor and the GHP office on a regular basis before the project starts, during the project, and at the close of the project.
  • Students leaving Montreal must participate in pre-departure training, which will vary based on your project and department. Exact requirements will be communicated for each student by the GHP office.
  • Students are required to submit a brief report about their research project to GHP. You will be given a template for this report.
  • Students are required to attend McGill's Global Health Night (November 2018) and present a poster.
  • Participation in this project will be part of the student’s McGill Co-Curricular Record.

2018 Projects:

International - $5,000CAD

Standardized patients: an approach to understanding the realities of South Africa’s health care cascade - Dr. Amrita Daftary, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health

Location: Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC), South Africa

Project Summary: The study uses standardized patients or actors trained to portray real patients, to assess the quality of care for tuberculosis, including drug-resistant TB and TB-HIV coinfection, among private doctors in South Africa. The study involves the collection and analysis of quantitative and qualitative data.

Faculty Preferences: Must haves: Excel, strong flexibility, patience and adaptability (ability to adapt to new cultural and social settings and work independently),
Desirable skills: Stata, online survey software (eg Survey CTO)

Timeline: May to Aug, First 240hrs funded through Scholars program, potential to increase funding for another 4-6 weeks depending on caliber and quality of work. Preference may be given to students who can commit for the whole summer.

Onsite supervisor(s): Amrita Daftary, Jody Boffa (postdoc), fellow investigators (Sizulu Moyo, Jeremiah Chikovore) based at HSRC

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

Preparing the path for scaling up: Women's Circles as a collective intervention to improve maternal psychosocial health and wellbeing in marginalized communities of Guatemala - Anne Cockroft, Department of Family Medicine

Location: The student will be based in the city of Quetzaltenango, in Guatemala, and will travel to various rural study sites

Project Summary: Proyecto Buena Semilla is a implementation participatory research project serving marginalized indigenous communities in the Western Highlands of Guatemala and targeting maternal and child health through holistic, participatory, collective and community-based methodologies. It contributes significantly to the global implementation research discourse on maternal psychosocial health interventions and improved maternal and child health, especially with regard to working in an indigenous context; engaging local populations as full participants in the co-design and co-implementation of culturally safe, locally relevant interventions; and drawing from local, indigenous knowledge to strengthen integrative  and integrating it into formal health care programs.

Faculty Preferences: Experience with smartphones or creating and developing websites preferred.
Strong writing and communication skills, high fluency in Spanish (spoken, written), and strong self initiative are needed.
Up to 2 students will be considered for this project. 
Students with prior work experience working in other developing countries, and with a strong interest in working with marginalized and/or indigenous populations will be given strong preference.
Students with special interest in maternal and child health, psychosocial health, men’s involvement in maternal and child health, and participatory research are especially encouraged to apply.

Timeline: Flexible

Onsite supervisor(s): Anne Marie Chomat (postdoctoral fellow)

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

The Translation of Costs Leading up to a Childhood Cancer Diagnosis into Practice and Policy  - Dr. Argerie Tsimicalis, Ingram School of Nursing

Location: CanKids, New Delhi, India

Project Summary: This project is part of an in-progress, 14-site, prospective study to understand the costs incurred by families of children with cancer in 4 cities in India. Guided by the Knowledge to Action Framework, the student(s) will assemble a task force to translate emerging findings into practice and policy.

Faculty Preferences: Strong writing skills in English; Highly motivated to acquire field experience; Expectation and ability to be versatile in a low-resource setting; Cultural sensitivity and tactful communication; Creative.
Assets: Spoken Hindi; Experience with traveling (and living) abroad; Ability to motivate and engage a community; Response to constructive feedback; A willingness to learn; Committed to seeing the task to completion.
Up to 2 students will be considered for this project.  
Please see our community partner, CanKids, at: http://www.cankidsindia.org).

Timeline: Flexible

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Ramandeep Arora, a physician colleague, who has supervised 5 McGill students to date (2 nursing, 1 law, 1 medical, and 1 international development).

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

Barriers and delays in access to care for patients with head and neck cancers in resource-limited settings - Dr. Dan Poenaru, Department of Pediatric Surgery

Location: Senegal (Hôpital Principal - Dakar), Benin, Other West African Countries

Project Summary: Head and neck cancer (H&NC) represents a growing threat in the low- and moderate-income countries (LMICs). In sub-Saharan Africa, the situation is particularly difficult with most patients presenting with advanced diseases. How to best implement durable and safe interventions in LMICs is not clear and the literature is limited in terms of describing the barriers to care (BCs) for this population. The goal of this project is to investigate the BCs for H&NC patients by exploring the delays to presentation, referral and treatment in sub-Saharan Africa by collecting data directly from H&NC patients with the administration of a specifically tailored questionnaire.

Faculty Preferences: Time management, resiliency, use of MS Excel, enthusiasm for global surgery.
Accepting medical students (MDCM, Med-P, and NTP) only. 

Timeline: 6 weeks - Time Frame Flexible

Onsite supervisor(s): TBD: Either a head and neck surgeon from the center or a research fellow from the team

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

Validation of pediatric surgery bellwether procedures in Uganda - Dr. Dan Poenaru, Department of Pediatric Surgery

Location: Uganda

Project Summary: Bellwethers procedures in global surgery have been suggested as a method to predict a hospital’s capacity to perform other surgical procedures and assist a government’s ability to scale up national surgical plans. Three bellwethers procedures were selected by an expert consensus for adult general surgery and include cesarean section, open facture treatment, and laparotomy. A study is currently in progress selecting pediatric bellwether procedures by expert consensus. The objective of this study is to validate the chosen pediatric general surgery bellwethers using national and local data in Uganda. 

A student will retrospectively review operating room registries throughout Uganda for pediatric surgeries. The student will collect relevant data on type of surgery, emergency or elective surgery, and whether the patient was transferred from a different facility. The student will also assess general workforce and resource capacity. The purpose will then be to compare the records from the field with the results from consensus survey for correlation to predict a hospital’s capacity to perform other essential pediatric surgery.

Faculty Preferences: Ability to travel independently, strong communication skills, resiliency, Excel, enthusiasm for global surgery.
Accepting medical students (MDCM, Med-P and NTP) only. 

Timeline: 6 weeks - Time Frame Flexible

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Kathryn LaRusso and a local supervisor TBD

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

Pediatric trauma epidemiology and outcomes in Rwanda Dr. Jean-Martin Laberge, Department of Pediatric Surgery

Location: Kigali, Rwanda

Project Summary: The Rwanda Injury Registry was reinstated in December 2017. This quality improvement tool is a prospectively maintained database that captures patient information on all injured patients who are referred to Kigali University Teaching Hospital (CHUK) for management of their injuries, who are admitted to CHUK for treatment of their injuries, or who died because of their injuries. The purpose of this project will be to analyze the data of patients under the age of 15 who were entered in the registry and investigate the epidemiology of injury and the outcomes of these patients.

Faculty Preferences: Time management, people skills, resiliency, Excel, enthusiasm for global surgery, strong writing skills.
Only medical students (MDCM, Med-P or NTP) will be considered. 

Timeline: 6 weeks (summer, flexible)

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Edmond Ntaganda (Pediatric Surgeon in Rwanda)

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

A pilot study of the acute cardiovascular impacts of exposure to traffic-related air pollution and its oxidative potential among adults in urban Colombia - Dr. Jill Baumgartner, Institute for Health and Social Policy

Location: Bucaramanga, Colombia

Project Summary: Motor vehicle traffic is a significant and increasing source of urban air pollution in low- and middle-income countries, particularly in Latin America and Asia. Traffic-related air pollution is emitted from both combustion (i.e., tailpipe emissions) and non-combustion sources (i.e., tire wear, brake wear, and resuspended road dust). Many epidemiologic studies associate exposure to traffic-related air pollution with increased cardiovascular hospitalization and death. However, the importance of different combustion and non-combustion sources of traffic pollution on human health are unknown, posing a barrier to the formulation of transportation infrastructure planning and policy to mitigate the health risks of traffic. Particularly little is known about the health impacts of traffic-related air pollution in low- and middle-income countries where the chemical composition and dispersion of traffic pollution differs from high-income countries due to differences in vehicle fleets and maintenance, road infrastructure, and city planning (i.e., the proximity of homes to traffic). We propose to leverage existing research infrastructure in urban Bucaramanga, Colombia and conduct a pilot study that combines novel air pollution exposure metrics and biological monitoring in retired adults to investigate the most harmful PM components and sources of traffic-related air pollution.

Faculty Preferences: Must be conversationally competent in Spanish

Timeline: mid-May through mid- to late-June

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Jill Baumgartner and an in-country collaborator at the Autonomous University of Bucaramanga.

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

Assessing the new 911 emergency service in reducing road traffic injury and mortality rates in the Dominican Republic - Dr. Arijit Nandi, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health

Location: Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

Project Summary: The Dominican Republic has the highest traffic fatality rate in Latin American and the Caribbean. In 2011 this country established a 911 emergency service in Santo Domingo. The objective of this project is to assess this service in its impact on road traffic fatalities and injuries reduction.

Faculty Preferences: Experience with data analysis with R, Stata or any statistical package, and managing and integrating large data sets such as Access.
Spanish OR French at an intermediate level is required. 

Timeline: June 2018

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Adrian Puello, professor of epidemiology and public health of Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo (UASD) and Dr. José Ignacio Nazif-Muñoz (Institute for Health and Social Policy)

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student on their own

Screening and Management of Gestational Diabetes and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy in Haiti - Dr. Julia von Oettingen, Department of Pediatrics

Location: St. Nicolas Hospital in St. Marc, Artibonite Region, Haiti

Project Summary: A novel program for the diagnosis and treatment of gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy is being conducted at the Saint-Nicolas Hospital in Saint Marc, Artibonite region, in Haiti. Barriers to feasibility and acceptability non-communicable diseases (NCDs) screening during pregnancy in a resource-limited setting such as Haiti are not known. The study will provide information about the feasibility, acceptability, effectiveness and limitations associated with the implementation of protocols to screen and manage important NCDs during pregnancy in Haiti.

Faculty Preferences: Basic Public Health Sciences Skills: Ability to identify and apply basic research methods used in public health; Ability to identify and retrieve current relevant scientific evidence.
Analytic Assessment Skills: Ability to collect, interpret, and communicate information relevant to the issue of diabetes and hypertension in pregnant women and outcomes in their neonates; Ability to analyze information to determine feasibility, uses, gaps and limitations of each screening option.
Communication Skills: Ability to conduct interviews or administer questionnaires; Ability to present information collected from evidence-based literature to relevant health professionals and concerned audience; Proficiency in French; Proficiency in Haitian Creole preferred
Prior work with vulnerable populations preferred
Prior travel experience or experience living abroad an asset

Timeline: June through August. First 240hrs funded through Scholars program, potential to increase funding for another 4-6 weeks depending on caliber and quality of work. Preference may be given to students who can commit for the whole summer.

Onsite supervisor(s): Co-investigator and co-supervisor, Dr. Rodney Destiné

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Supervisor arranged

Gestational diabetes screening to resource limited settings - Use of local glucose sources - Dr. Julia von Oettingen, Department of Pediatrics

Location: St. Nicolas Hospital in St. Marc, Artibonite Region, Haiti

Project Summary: In many resource limited settings, screening for gestational diabetes is not routine. Even if screening is being offered, standard commercial glucose preparations such as Glucola are often not available, limiting the possibility to offer the screening test.
The goal of this project is to test  alternative sources of glucose that are locally available in Haiti (such as sugar cane or local candy) against the standard glucose drink Glucola for use during the oral glucose tolerance test administered to a group of pregnant women in Haiti.

Faculty Preferences: Basic Public Health Sciences Skills: Ability to identify and apply basic research methods used in public health; Ability to identify and retrieve current relevant scientific evidence.
Analytic Assessment Skills: Ability to collect, interpret, and communicate information relevant to the issue of diabetes and hypertension in pregnant women and outcomes in their neonates; Ability to analyze information to determine feasibility, uses, gaps and limitations of each screening option.
Communication Skills: Ability to conduct interviews or administer questionnaires; Ability to present information collected from evidence-based literature to relevant health professionals and concerned audience; Proficiency in French; Proficiency in Haitian Creole preferred
Prior work with vulnerable populations preferred
Prior travel experience or experience living abroad an asset

Timeline: June through August. First 240hrs funded through Scholars program, potential to increase funding for another 4-6 weeks depending on caliber and quality of work. Preference may be given to students who can commit for the whole summer.

Onsite supervisor(s): Co-investigator and co-supervisor, Dr. Rodney Destiné

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Supervisor arranged

Exploring and enhancing disability and social welfare policy in Zambia through participatory research - Dr. Matthew Hunt, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy

Location: Mongu, Western Province; Zambart at the University of Zambia, Lusaka

Project Summary: This project is based in two locations in Zambia: the capital (Lusaka) and rural Western Province.
We are exploring disability and social welfare policy: How are these policies made? What are their effects?
We are pursuing this project together with various stakeholders: communities of persons with disabilities, disability advocates, and policymakers.

Faculty Preferences: Interest in qualitative research. Experience with interviews and data analysis would be an asset.
This opportunity would be most valuable for applicants interested in the social model of disability, human rights and capability approaches to disability, and/or disability and development.

Timeline: A minimum of four weeks onsite involvement in Zambia in May. The timeframe and location of the remaining two weeks is flexible.

Onsite supervisor(s): Shaun Cleaver (postdoctoral fellow)

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

Validating first trimester pregnancy status in adult women to inform implementation of deworming programs in Peru - Dr. Theresa Gyorkos, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health

Location: Iquitos, Peru

Project Summary: Although pregnancy tests can be administered to assess the pregnancy status of individual women, it is not feasible to do so in the context of large-scale public health interventions such as deworming, primarily because of the prohibitive costs. The administration of a short, focused questionnaire represents a cost-effective and context-adaptable alternative. The proposed research project will determine the predictive potential of such a questionnaire in correctly identifying pregnancies (especially in the first trimester, when deworming treatment is contraindicated) and thus will have important implications for the inclusion of women in deworming programs worldwide.

Faculty Preferences: Independent, adaptable
Good interviewing skills
Speaks Spanish
Preferably female (for shared accommodation)
Previous travel to a developing country an asset

Timeline: mid-May to  mid-August

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr. Martin Casapia, based in Lima, Peru will visit the research site as well and provide any necessary additional assistance from Lima. (Iquitos is a 1.5 hour flight from Lima.)

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

Northern Canada - $5,000CAD

Violence prevention and creating supportive environments in Eeyou Istchee - Anne Andermann, Department of Family Medicine

Location: Waskaganish, Quebec, Canada

Project Summary: Opportunity to work with the Public Health Department of the Cree Health Board on a project relating to violence prevention and creating supportive environments in Eeyou Istchee. In the case where the partner site is not able to host the Scholar, the project would then be based in Montreal and the student would receive a $2,500 stipend.

Faculty Preferences: Cultural competency
Takes initiative
Produces deliverables within tight timelines

Timeline: May-July (to be discussed)

Onsite supervisor(s): Dr Marie Carmen Berlie / George Diamond

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Supervisor arranged

Working with Inuit communities to improve cervical cancer screening coverage in Nunavik, Quebec - Paul Brassard, Department of Medicine

Location: Nunavik , QC

Project Summary: Our research project aims to develop and implement a self-screening strategy for HPV and cervical cancer in Nunavik, Quebec, in order to improve the rates of screening and to ultimately reduce the burden of HPV infection and cervical cancer.

Faculty Preferences: Bilingual (French-English), interviewing, social science skills (training) , epidemiology an asset
Excellent interpersonal and communication skills, flexibility
Particular interest in women's health issues

Timeline: Mid-June to August

Onsite supervisor(s): Research Coordinator( to be named)

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Supervisor arranged

Transforming youth mental health care in Ulukhaktok, NWT: Creatively integrating lay workers and community engagement - Dr. Srividya Iyer, Department of Psychiatry

Location: Ulukhaktok, NWT

Project Summary: The remote community of Ulukhaktok is a demonstration site in ACCESS Open Minds, a pan-Canadian CIHR-funded youth mental health services transformation and research initiative. This transformation, currently being implemented and evaluated, entails community-wide engagement; two trained lay workers (one Elder and one youth) to offer intakes and basic interventions; integration of existing services; and mapping of external services. The project will involve supporting the Ulukhaktok community site in its evaluation and knowledge translation objectives, as efforts are underway to introduce similar models in other remote communities in NWT.

Faculty Preferences: - Experience with and/or demonstrable commitment to working respectfully with Indigenous communities
- Strong writing skills
- Experience with and/or interest in youth health/youth mental health/well-being/engagement
- Quantitative and qualitative research skills considered an asset

Timeline: Flexible

Onsite supervisor(s): Meghan Etter (Co-applicant in NWT)

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Student with supervisor advice

Diarrheal Illness and Enteric Infections Among Young Children in Nunavik and Nunavut - Dr.Cédric Yansouni, Department of Medical Microbiology - New project!

Location: Centre de santé Tulattavik de l'Ungava in Kuujjuaq and Qikiqtani General Hospital in Iqaluit

Project Summary: The recent recognition of widespread human disease from a parasite called Cryptosporidium in the Canadian Arctic is cause for considerable concern. This project will look for harmful germs in stool (feces) from preschool-age children in two large Arctic communities to (i) define the frequency and cause of proven diarrheal infections, (ii) assess their impact on child growth and development, and (iii) inform prevention efforts. See http://www.arcticnet.ulaval.ca/research/summary.php?project_id=127

Faculty Preferences: Independence, initiave, and strong social skills are essential.
Comfort with MS Exel is essential.
French is an asset, but not essential.
Experience with children an asset.
Dr. Yansouni would be happy to discuss with applicants before they commit. Applicants are also welcome to contact previous Global Health Scholars on this project for peer-peer information.

Timeline: June-August, 4 weeks. To be determined according to community and staff availability

Onsite supervisor(s): In Kuujjuaq : Serge Doiron RT, Assistant chef laboratoire Centre de santé Tulattavik de l'Ungava; In Iqaluit : Sonia Marchand Qikiqtani General Hospital

Travel and Lodging arrangements: Supervisor arranged

Montreal-based - $2,500CAD

Food insecurity and adolescent mental health - Dr. Frank Elgar, Institute for Health and Social Policy

Location: Institute for Health and Social Policy (1130 Pine Ave West)

Project Summary: Food insecurity constitutes the single largest risk factor for the global burden of disease. Limited access to nutritious food contributes to mental health problems in children and youth, however evidence gaps in this area preclude an effective policy response. This epidemiological project uses large international datasets to investigate food insecurity as both a determinant of adolescent depression and suicide and a causal pathway through which poverty harms health. It involves statistical analysis of data from the Global School-based student Health Survey, Gallup World Poll, and WHO Mortality Database. These sources provide contextual and individual data on food insecurity, poverty, and mental health in low- and middle-income countries. The student and supervisor will collaborate on co-authoring an article and/or working paper for eventual journal publication.

Faculty Preferences: Literature searches and writing; experience with regression modelling in STATA would be an asset.

Timeline:mid-June to August

Physiotherapy resources available, and barriers to accessing physiotherapy services, for refugees living in Montreal, Quebec. - Crystal Garnett, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy

Location: Montreal, Quebec

Project Summary: This project will review the existing physiotherapy resources available to refugees in Montreal, Quebec, and will identify barriers that this population faces in accessing these services. Quebec receives a large influx of refugees, from January to October 2017, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) processed 12,110 asylum claims for Quebec. This project seeks to increase awareness for refugees about physiotherapy resources available to them, and to identify existing barriers that can lead to reflections and possible solutions related to equity in access to physiotherapy services.

Faculty Preferences: Good knowledge of the physiotherapy profession; Strong writing skills; Strong communication skills

Timeline: Flexible May 1- August 31, 2018

Is neuroimaging compatible with global mental health? - Eric Racine, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery

Location: Neuroethics Research Unit, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montreal

Project Summary: Although enthusiasm has been expressed about the potential of neuroimaging in an international context, there are reasons to question the compatibility of neuroimaging and global mental health. To address these concerns, this project will explore challenges which are ethical in nature, ranging from access to neuroimaging for diagnostic purposes to the paradigmatic differences between global mental health and neuroimaging. The goal of the project is less to solve the debates at stake than to formulate them and promote dialogue about these ethical questions.

Faculty Preferences: Literature search and review skills, strong writing and proofreading skills, critical thinking skills, excellent command of English language and grammar, interest in global health and health ethics

Timeline: Mid-May through Mid-July

Planning and Expanding Global Health Research 1970-2017 - George Weisz, Department of Social Studies of Medicine

Location: Social Studies of Medicine, McGill

Project Summary: Research is central to global health activity. Since the 1970s much effort has gone into expanding, organizing and rationalizing this research activity.The resulting innovations and developments have helped shape current global health institutions.

Faculty Preferences: Strong writing skills, background in history, political science or any related discipline

Timeline: Flexible: anytime between mid-May and end of August

Pathways to Health Equity: Culturally-Based Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Promotion for Indigenous Youth - Laurence Kirmayer, Department of Psychiatry

Location: Institute of Community and Family Psychiatry, Jewish General Hospital

Project Summary: The project seeks to address the challenge of suicide prevention and mental health promotion for First Nations youth in communities across Canada. Specifically, we aim to develop a toolkit and strategies for the cultural adaptation and delivery of a broad-based mental health promotion and suicide prevention program for First Nations youth (www.mcgill.ca/mhp)

Faculty Preferences: - strong written and oral communication skills
- qualitative research skills are an asset (e.g., coding, transcription of interviews, interview note taking)
- ability to conduct systematic literature reviews
- experience with database management

Timeline: June-August, 2018

Born of War: The Perspectives, Rights, and Needs of Children Born of Wartime Sexual Violence - Dr. Myriam Denov, School of Social Work

Location: McGill University

Project Summary: Sexual violence during armed conflict is one of the most horrific wartime human rights abuses. In the last decade alone, it is estimated that tens of thousands of children have resulted from wartime mass rape campaigns, sexual violence, and forced pregnancy in conflicts around the globe. Born of war, these children are deeply affected by the social upheavals that brought about their conception. This research will carry out a three-country study to investigate the realities, perspectives, health and well-being needs of children born of wartime sexual violence in northern Uganda, Cambodia, and Rwanda.

Faculty Preferences: Strong writing skills; Strong knowledge of international human rights, sexual violence, and armed conflict

Timeline: mid-June to end of August

Addressing the Health Challenges of those at the Bottom of the Pyramid in Developing Countries - Paola Perez-Aleman, Faculty of Management

Location: McGill University

Project Summary: This project focuses on understanding efforts by developing countries to become innovators in health technologies related to neglected diseases affecting low-income groups. This part of the research project will examine actions to address health challenges and how they combine social and economic goals as diverse organizations innovate new products and processes.

Faculty Preferences: Portuguese language a plus; Strong writing skills; Strong interest in the topic of global health, innovation and development;  Creative; Analytical capabilities for qualitative and quantitative data analysis; Takes initiative; Responsible, disciplined

Timeline: May 1-August 31

Development of Guidelines for using Methotrexate to treat rheumatic diseases in Africa: systematic literature review - Dr. Sasha Bernatsky, Department of Medicine

Location: Centre for Outcomes Research & Evaluation (CORE), 5252 de maisonneuve, Montreal. Co-supervisors will also be Dr. Ines Colmegna and Dr. Rosie Scuccimarri.

Project Summary: Appropriate institution of DMARDs is fundamental to optimal outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Most RA management guidelines recommend early use of methotrexate (MTX) however most guidelines are exceedingly difficult to apply in resource-poor areas such as East Africa due to local realities of health care delivery. In consultation with co-investigators in Ethiopia and USA and other Canadian provinces, we are performing a focused systematic literature review. The question for this project is the effect of MTX on tuberculosis and HIV reactivation and complications. A systematic literature review will be updated. The student will review the abstracts and manuscripts of identified articles and extract data elements and with supervision summarize data. This review is a needed first step to inform recommendations for MTX that are culturally appropriate and feasible.

Faculty Preferences: Knowledge of Endnote software for managing references. Facility in English reading and writing.

Timeline: Summer, but some flexibility. Available after hours for teleconferences with investigators located outside of Montreal.

Investigating strain-specific differences between historical and contemporary Zika virus isolates - Dr. Selena Sagan, Department of Microbiology & Immunology

Location: McIntrye Medical Building

Project Summary: Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne pathogen that has recently become a significant global health concern due to its rapid geographical expansion. Historically, ZIKV infection resulted in mild febrile illness, but recent outbreaks have been associated with more severe neurological symptoms. We are interested in investigating genetic polymorphisms in the current outbreak strains that may have led to this increase in pathogenesis and overall viral fitness.

Faculty Preferences: Molecular biology lab experience.

Timeline: May 1st to August 31st (flexible)

Outcomes and family factors of early psychosis in Chennai, India and Montreal, Canada - Dr. Srividya Iyer, Department of Psychiatry

Location: Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal

Project Summary: This long-term mixed methods research project examines multiple outcome domains (clinical, functional, subjective) and the role of family factors in two early intervention services for psychosis in India and Canada. An array of quantitative data and qualitative data (interviews, focus groups, etc.) have been collected that allow detailed examination of outcomes and family support in these two contexts.

Faculty Preferences: Strong writing skills;
Experience with qualitative coding/analysis would be a strong asset;
Experience using SPSS would be an asset;
Experience in and/or strong interest in mental health research;
Experience and/or strong interest in global health, with a focus on India or South Asia

Timeline:Flexible

AideSmart! Canada - Dr. Nitika Pant Pai, Department of Medicine

Location: Research Institute of the MUHC, Montreal

Project Summary: The AideSmart! project is a CIHR funded project based in Montreal. The student will assist the team in the Canadian adaptation of the AideSmart! program, which trains front-line health care professionals to offer point-of-care testing for multiple infections (HIV, HCV, HBV, syphilis) to marginalized populations, in 4 provinces.

Faculty Preferences: 1. Experience with content creation
2. Experience with languages (French, English, Cree)
3. Strong PowerPoint and writing skills
4. Coding skills (not essential but will be great)

Timeline:June to August

HIVSmart! Africa - Dr. Nitika Pant Pai, Department of Medicine

Location:Research Institute of the MUHC, Montreal

Project Summary: HIVSmart!, funded by Grand Challenges Canada and the South African Government, is an app-optimized HIV self-testing program that allows users to self-test for HIV and links them to counseling and care. The project will entail language adaptations and customization of the HIVSmart! program to suit the needs of African populations.

Faculty Preferences: 1. Experience with content creation
2. Experience with African languages
3. Strong PowerPoint and writing skills
4. Coding skills (not essential but will be great)

Timeline: June to August

A Collaborative Partnership to Develop Smoking Cessation Interventions in Nunavik - Dr. Amrita Daftary, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health

Location:MUHC Research Institute

Project Summary: The study uses participatory methods to explore contextual influences on smoking among the Inuit of Nunavik, to determine how evidence-based smoking cessation interventions can be adapted and tailored in ways that meaningfully engage this community and succeed in addressing their unique needs.

Faculty Preferences: Must haves: MS Office, Critical thinking and writing, flexibility, patience and adaptability (ability to adapt to new cultural and social settings and work independently),
Desirable skills: Qualitative coding, Endnote, Inuktitut language proficiency
Experience and/or a strong interest to work with Indigenous communities an asset

Timeline: May to Aug 2018. First 240 hrs funded through Scholars program, potential to increase funding for another 4-6 weeks depending on student caliber and quality of work. Preference may be given to students who can commit for the whole summer.

 

 

Global Health Scholars are supported by:

The Global Health Scholars Program is supported by the Knightsgrange Foundation. The Foundation supports all aspects of the program including mentorship by academic staff, summer placement on international global health projects, training events, and other unique opportunities. Undergraduate student recipients supported by the Knightsgrange Foundation are known as John Locke Churchill Scholars.

Cavazzoni Family Undergraduate Award for Global Health - Established in 2015 by Patrizia Adele Cavazzoni, M.D.,C.M. 1987, these travel stipends will be awarded to three to five outstanding undergraduate students at McGill University undertaking a mentored research project including an international component with McGill Global Health Programs. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs.

Davis, Brun, & De Rito Undergraduate Award for Global Health - Established in 2016 by Francine Davis, B Phys Ther 1969, BSc(PT) 1985 in memory of, and gratitude for the support of Jeanne Brun, Gisèle Brun and Tony De Rito.  For outstanding undergraduate students at McGill University undertaking a mentored research project including an international component with McGill Global Health Programs, in the area of women’s and girls’ health. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs.

Dr. Kenneth Remsen Global Health Award - Established in 2018 by Dr. Kenneth Alan Remsen, MDCM 1980. To provide travel support and/or stipends for one or more outstanding MDCM students enrolled in the Faculty of Medicine who are participating in the Global Health Scholars program by undertaking a mentored global health project in an international setting, in Northern Canada, or from Montreal. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs. Value: varies.

Dr. Margaret Siber Global Health Scholar Award  - Established in 2017 by Dr. Margaret Siber, MDCM 1970. To provide travel support and/or stipends for one or more outstanding MDCM students enrolled in the Faculty of Medicine who are participating in the Global Health Scholars program by undertaking a mentored global health project in an international setting, in Northern Canada, or from Montreal. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs. Value: varies

The Medicine Class of 1965 International Health Student Fund - Established in May 2000 by the Class of Medicine 1965 in appreciation of the education they received at McGill.  Funds will be used to allow medical students to pursue research or clinical electives overseas.  One bursary will be awarded in each application round.

William and Caroline Krishnappa Travel Award for Global Health - Established in 2017 by Harriet H. Stairs, BA 1967 and Andrea Stairs Krishnappa, BA 1996, in honour of their grandchildren and children, William and Caroline Krishnappa. To provide travel support for one undergraduate student pursuing a global health project in India in the summer. Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine upon recommendation of the Director of Global Health Programs.

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