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HIV target shows surprising resistance

By Tod Hoffman, Lady Davis Institute  Research reveals that even a tiny mutation can allow the HIV virus to become resistant to therapies using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing platform

Published on : 08 Apr 2016

Same gene can encode proteins with divergent functions

By Cynthia Lee, McGill Newsroom It’s not unusual for siblings to seem more dissimilar than similar: one becoming a florist, for example, another becoming a flutist, and another becoming a physicist.

Published on : 11 Feb 2016

Chronic pain changes our immune systems

By Cynthia LeeNewsroom Chronic pain may reprogram the way genes work in the immune system, according to a new study by McGill University researchers published in the journal Scientific Reports.  

Published on : 28 Jan 2016

A ‘printing press’ for nanoparticles

Gold nanoparticles have unusual optical, electronic and chemical properties, which scientists are seeking to put to use in a range of new technologies, from nanoelectronics to cancer treatments.

Published on : 07 Jan 2016

The father effect

Discovery of how environmental memories may be transmitted from a man to his grandchildren

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Published on : 08 Oct 2015

A better way to build DNA scaffolds

Imagine taking strands of DNA – the material in our cells that determines how we look and function – and using it to build tiny structures that can deliver drugs to targets within the body or take electronic miniaturization to a whole new level.

Published on : 06 May 2015

Building tailor-made DNA nanotubes step by step

Researchers at McGill University have developed a new, low-cost method to build DNA nanotubes block by block – a breakthrough that could help pave the way for scaffolds made from DNA strands to be used in applications such as optical and electronic devices or smart drug-delivery systems.

Published on : 23 Feb 2015

DNA ‘cages’ may aid drug delivery

Nanoscale “cages” made from strands of DNA can encapsulate small-molecule drugs and release them in response to a specific stimulus, McGill University researchers report in a new study.

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Published on : 03 Sep 2013

Understanding the effects of genes on human traits

Recent technological developments in genomics have revealed a large number of genetic influences on common complex diseases, such as diabetes, asthma, cancer or schizophrenia. However, discovering a genetic variant predisposing to a disease is only a first step. To apply this knowledge towards prevention or cure, including tailoring treatment to the patient’s genetic profile –also known as personalized medicine – we need to know how this genetic variant affects health.

Classified as : External, genetics, medicine, DNA, RI-MUHC
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Published on : 01 Aug 2013

Genomic atlas of gene switches in plants

What allows certain plants to survive freezing and thrive in the Canadian climate, while others are sensitive to the slightest drop in temperature? Those that flourish activate specific genes at just the right time -- but the way gene activation is controlled remains poorly understood.

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Published on : 02 Jul 2013

Chronic pain alters DNA marking in the brain

Injuries that result in chronic pain, such as limb injuries, and those unrelated to the brain are associated with epigenetic changes in the brain which persist months after the injury, according to researchers at McGill University. Epigenetics explores how the environment – including diet, exposure to contaminants and social conditions such as poverty – can have a long-term impact on the activity of our genes.

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Published on : 14 Feb 2013

Early life adversity affects broad regions of brain DNA

Early life experience results in a broad change in the way our DNA is “epigenetically” chemically marked in the brain by a coat of small chemicals called methyl groups, according to researchers at McGill University. A group of researchers led by Prof. Moshe Szyf, a professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in the Faculty of Medicine, and research scientists at the Douglas Institute have discovered a remarkable similarity in the way the DNA in human brains and the DNA in animal brains respond to early life adversity. The finding suggests an evolutionary conserved mechanism of response to early life adversity affecting a large number of genes in the genome. 

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Published on : 10 Oct 2012