epigenetics

How sperm remember

Published: 16Mar2021

It has long been understood that a parent’s DNA is the principal determinant of health and disease in offspring. Yet inheritance via DNA is only part of the story; a father’s lifestyle such as diet...

Beyond the Pap Smear

Published: 13Feb2020

McGill researchers identify new markers for early detection of cervical cancer   By Ashley Rabinovitch

When treating and researching infertility, let’s not forget the men

Published: 27Aug2018

By Vardit Ravitsky, Associate Professor of Bioethics at the University of Montreal and Sarah Kimmins, Associate Professor at McGill University and Canada Research Chair in Epigenetics, Reproduction...

Nurses’ care of young mothers leaves traces in babies’ DNA

Published: 1May2018

Researchers have known for a couple of decades that early life adversity can affect the way that particular genes function through a process called epigenetics - a bit like a dimmer switch on a...

Epigenetic alteration of a vitamin B12 processing gene shines new light on our understanding of rare diseases

Published: 30Jan2018

Rare hereditary recessive diseases were thought to be expressed in offspring only when both parents carry a mutation in the causal gene, but a new study is changing this paradigm. An international...

Article from Dr. Michael Meaney's lab featured in ScienceDaily

Published: 11Oct2012

From the lab of CIFAR Fellow Michael Meaney (McGill University): Scientists have provided evidence that socioeconomic status affects family function and the development and function of brain...

Father's lasting influence: Molecular foundations of intergenerational transmission of the paternal environment

Published: 22Apr2015

Laval and McGill researchers team up with Health Canada and international researchers from Africa, Italy, Copenhagen and Greenland to investigate the impact of environmental exposures on the...

DNA signature found in ice storm babies

Published: 29Sep2014

The number of days an expectant mother was deprived of electricity during Quebec’s Ice Storm (1998) predicts the epigenetic profile of her child, a new study finds.

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