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evolution

Why do some fish thrive in oil-polluted water?

Scientists thought guppies in Northern Trinidad could be a rare example of adaptation to crude oil pollution. But they found something else.
Tue, 2016-01-26 02:58

By Melody Enguix

McGill Newsroom

When scientists from McGill University learned that some fish were proliferating in rivers and ponds polluted by oil extraction in Southern Trinidad, it caught their attention. They thought they had found a rare example of a species able to adapt to crude oil pollution.

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Contact: Vincent C. Allaire
Organization: Communications associate - McGill Media Relations Office
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Office Phone: 514-398-6693
Mobile Phone: 514-704-6693
Source Site: /newsroom

Baba Brinkman @ McGill: THE RAP GUIDE TO EVOLUTION

Fri, 2015-05-08 20:30 - 22:00
Brown Student Services : SSMU Ballroom, 3600 rue McTavish Montreal Quebec Canada , H3A 0G3
Price: $10 general, $5 for students with ID (18+ show).

Baba will perform his off-broadway show, The Rap Guide to Evolution, on Friday, May 8, 8:30 PM at the SSMU ballroom (3706 Rue Peel – 3rd floor). Doors open at 8:00 PM.

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Source Site: /redpath
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The science of beaks

Fri, 2015-03-06 15:03

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Source Site: /newsroom

What the “fecal prints” of microbes can tell us about E

Making the most of a shitty situation
Tue, 2014-12-23 10:29

The distinctive “fecal prints” of microbes potentially provide a record of how Earth and life have co-evolved over the past 3.5 billion years as the planet’s temperature, oxygen levels, and greenhouse gases have changed. But, despite more than 60 years of study, it has proved difficult, until now, to “read” much of the information contained in this record. Research from McGill University and Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), sheds light on the mysterious digestive processes of microbes, opening the way towards a better understanding of how life and the planet have changed over time.

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Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations Office
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Office Phone: 514-398-2189
Source Site: /newsroom

Parasites and the evolution of primate culture

Study examines ‘costs’ of innovation, learning from others
Wed, 2014-12-03 10:15

Learning from others and innovation have undoubtedly helped advance civilization. But these behaviours can carry costs as well as benefits. And a new study by an international team of evolutionary biologists sheds light on how one particular cost – increased exposure to parasites – may affect cultural evolution in non-human primates.

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Contact: Chris Chipello
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-4201
Source Site: /newsroom

Walking fish reveal how our ancestors evolved onto land

About 400 million years ago a group of fish began exploring land and evolved into tetrapods – today's amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. But just how these ancient fish used their fishy bodies and fins in a terrestrial environment and what evolutionary processes were at play remain scientific mysteries.
Wed, 2014-08-27 13:06

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Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations Office
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Office Phone: 514-398-6754
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Source Site: /newsroom

How birds got their wings

Fossil data show scaling of limbs altered as birds originated from dinosaurs
Tue, 2013-09-17 12:48

Birds originated from a group of small, meat-eating theropod dinosaurs called maniraptorans sometime around 150 million years ago. Recent findings from around the world show that many maniraptorans were very bird-like, with feathers, hollow bones, small body sizes and high metabolic rates. 

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Contact: Chris Chipello
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-4201

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Contact: Hans Larsson
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Source Site: /newsroom

Mining ancient ores for clues to early life

Scientists probe Canadian sulfide ore to confirm microbial activity in seawater 2.7 billion years ago
Mon, 2012-12-10 12:48

An analysis of sulfide ore deposits from one of the world’s richest base-metal mines confirms that oxygen levels were extremely low on Earth 2.7 billion years ago, but also shows that microbes were actively feeding on sulfate in the ocean and influencing seawater chemistry during that geological time period.

Contact Information

Contact: Chris Chipello
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-4201
Mobile Phone: 514-717-4201
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Source Site: /newsroom