Desautels research

Authors: Patrick Augustin, V. Sokolovski, M.G. Subrahmanyam, and D. Tomio

Publication: Journal of Financial Economics, Forthcoming

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Classified as: Patrick Augustin, finance, Desautels 22, Journal of Financial Economics
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Published on: 9 Feb 2021

Authors: Elena Obukhova and A.M. Kleinbaum

Publication: Academy of Management Discoveries, Forthcoming

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Classified as: Elena Obukhova, Strategy & Organization
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Published on: 9 Feb 2021

Authors: G. Chemla and Katrin Tinn

Publication: Management Science, Volume 66, Issue 5, May 2020, Pages 1783-1801.

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Classified as: Katrin Tinn, finance, Desautels 22, management science
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Published on: 9 Feb 2021

Authors: V. Pamuru, Warut Khern-am-nuai, K. N. Kannan

Publication: Information Systems Research, Forthcoming

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Classified as: Warut Khern-am-nuai, Information Systems, Desautels 22, Information Systems Research
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Published on: 9 Feb 2021

In two recent studies, Professor David Schumacher charts the rise of large asset managers and examines their effect on financial market stability. While market participants have a good reason to be concerned about financial fragility, Professor Schumacher finds that this fragility can actually increase corporate investment. Learn more

Classified as: David Schumacher, finance
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Published on: 11 Dec 2020

Congratulations to Professor Patricia Hewlin, Associate Professor in Organizational Behavior, for being selected as a finalist for the 2020 Academy of Management Annals Best Paper Award. Her paper, entitled “Being Your True Self at Work: Integrating the Fragmented Research on Authenticity in Organizations,” integrates and builds upon existing research on the topic of individual authenticity within organizations.

Classified as: Patricia Hewlin, Organizational Behaviour
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Published on: 27 Nov 2020

Authors: A. Jola-Sanchez, A. Pedraza Martinez and Juan Camilo Serpa

Publication: Management Science, Forthcoming

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We study how armed conflicts affect inventory across firms’ production facilities. We track 38,916 production facilities—including plantations, livestock farms, and factories—in war-torn Colombian regions; we also collect the data of 5,138 attacks performed by the two rebel groups involved in Colombia’s civil war. To obtain exogenous variation in the conflict intensity, we use a difference-in-differences model that hinges on the peace process between the government and one of the guerrilla groups. We find that when the conflict intensity increases by one order of magnitude, inventory decreases by up to 10.38%. Firms, however, barely reduce finished inventory during war; they mainly reduce raw and work-in-process inventory. To offset this inventory reduction, firms increase their cash holdings—that is, they shift their working capital from physical inventory to liquid assets. The location of the facility moderates the effect of war: when a facility is close to a distribution center—hence, inventory travels short distances—the firm responds to violence by aggressively reducing inventory; when a facility is far from a distribution center, the firm reacts less aggressively to war.

Classified as: Juan Serpa, operations management, Desautels 22, management science
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Published on: 13 Nov 2020

Authors: B. Pentland, Emmanuelle Vaast and J. Ryan Wolf

Publication: MIS Quarterly, Forthcoming

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The growing availability of digital trace data has generated unprecedented opportunities for analyzing, explaining, and predicting the dynamics of process change. While research on process organization studies theorizes about process and change, and research on process mining rigorously measures and models business processes, there has so far been limited research that measures and theorizes about process dynamics. This gap represents an opportunity for new Information Systems (IS) research. This research note lays the foundation for such an endeavor by demonstrating the use of process mining for diachronic analysis of process dynamics. We detail the definitions, assumptions, and mechanics of an approach that is based on representing processes as weighted, directed graphs. Using this representation, we offer a precise definition of process dynamics that focuses attention on describing and measuring changes in process structure over time. We analyze process structure over two years at four dermatology clinics. Our analysis reveals process changes that were invisible to the medical staff in the clinics. This approach offers empirical insights that are relevant to many theoretical perspectives on process dynamics.

Classified as: Emmanuelle Vaast, Information Systems, Desautels 22, MIS Quarterly
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Published on: 13 Nov 2020

Authors: M. Marabelli, and Emmanuelle Vaast

Publication: Information and Organization, Volume 30, Issue 3, September 2020, 100314

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Classified as: Emmanuelle Vaast, Information Systems
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Published on: 13 Nov 2020

Authors: A.V. Sergeeva, Samer Faraj, and M. Huysman

Publication: Organization Science, Volume 31, Issue 5, October 2020, Pages 1248-1271.

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Because new technologies allow new performances, mediations, representations, and information flows, they are often associated with changes in how coordination is achieved. Current coordination research emphasizes its situated and emergent nature, but seldom accounts for the role of embodied action. Building on a 25-month field study of the da Vinci robot, an endoscopic system for minimally invasive surgery, we bring to the fore the role of the body in how coordination was reconfigured in response to a change in technological mediation. Using the robot, surgeons experienced both an augmentation and a reduction of what they can do with their bodies in terms of haptic, visual, and auditory perception and manipulative dexterity. These bodily augmentations and reductions affected joint task performance and led to coordinative adaptations (e.g., spatial relocating, redistributing tasks, accommodating novel perceptual dependencies, and mounting novel responses) that, over time, resulted in reconfiguration of roles, including expanded occupational knowledge, emergence of new specializations, and shifts in status and boundaries. By emphasizing the importance of the body in coordination, this paper suggests that an embodiment perspective is important for explaining how and why coordination evolves following the introduction of a new technology.

Classified as: Samer Faraj, Desautels 22, Organization Science, Strategy & Organization
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Published on: 13 Nov 2020

Authors: Emmanuelle Vaast and Alain Pinsonneault

Publication: MIS Quarterly, Forthcoming

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Occupations are increasingly embedded with and affected by digital technologies. These technologies both enable and threaten occupational identity and create two important tensions: they make the persistence of an occupation possible while also potentially rendering it obsolete and they bring about both similarity and distinctiveness of an occupation with regard to other occupations. Based on the critical case study of an online community dedicated to data science, we investigate longitudinally how data scientists address the two tensions of occupational identity associated with digital technologies and reach transient syntheses in terms of “optimal distinctiveness” and “persistent extinction.” We propose that identity work associated with digital technologies follows a composite life-cycle and dialectical process. We explain that people constantly need to adjust and redefine their occupational identity (i.e., how they define who they are and what they do). We contribute to scholarship on digital technologies and identity work by illuminating how people deal in an ongoing manner with digital technologies that simultaneously enable and threaten their occupational identity.

Classified as: Emmanuelle Vaast, Alain Pinsonneault, Information Systems, MIS Quarterly, Desautels 22
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Published on: 13 Nov 2020

Authors: S. Spataro and Lisa E. Cohen

Publication: Journal of Organizational Psychology, Volume 20, Issue 1, June 2020, Pages 82-103.

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Classified as: Lisa Cohen, Organizational Behaviour
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Published on: 13 Nov 2020

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