Global Health NOW: Sick Cattle Infect Texan with H5N1; How Oral Health Professionals Can Help Trafficking Victims; and Pursuing Transplant Equity

Global Health Now - Tue, 04/02/2024 - 09:43
96 Global Health NOW: Sick Cattle Infect Texan with H5N1; How Oral Health Professionals Can Help Trafficking Victims; and Pursuing Transplant Equity View this email in your browser April 2, 2024 Forward Share Post Holstein cows are herded for milking at the Rising Sun Dairy in Dublin, Texas, on May 17, 2004. Mike Fuentes/Bloomberg via Getty Sick Cattle Infect Texan with H5N1
CDC and Texas health officials are closely monitoring contacts of an individual who tested positive this weekend for H5N1 avian flu—only the second-ever confirmed case in the U.S.
  • The individual had been in contact with dairy cows thought to be infected with the virus, per the Texas Department of State Health Services.

  • The patient, who’s only symptom so far is eye inflammation, is being treated with Tamiflu, STAT reports.

  • Contacts of the patient have not reported any flu symptoms, nor have officials found any symptomatic individuals following exposure to sick cattle, said Nirav Shah, CDC principal deputy director.
Global outbreak: The infection of dairy cattle in Texas, Kansas, and Michigan (and possibly New Mexico and Idaho) are part of a global H5N1 outbreak among birds and sea mammals, The New York Times reports.
  • Health officials have not found any indications that the virus has evolved in ways that enhance its ability to spread among humans.
The Quote: “We are still out there looking, to be very clear,” Shah told STAT. “Our antennae are up.” GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners   Levels of antibodies produced by the Mpox vaccine fall significantly within a year of vaccination, per a small study to be presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases later this month in Barcelona; however, individuals who had received the smallpox vaccination as a child maintained high antibody levels. News Medical

18,000+ excess U.S. tuberculosis cases are attributable to structural racism, concluded Harvard and CDC researchers; their analysis of national tuberculosis surveillance data, published in Annals of Internal Medicine, found persistent disparities in TB incidence among U.S.-born racial and ethnic minorities despite an overall decrease in cases observed from 2011 to 2021. Medical Xpress
 
Contamination of hospital surfaces with multidrug-resistant bacteria is common in six LMIC countries—Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Rwanda, and South Africa—a study published late last week reports; the Cardiff University researchers also found evidence that may link the contamination to cases of neonatal sepsis.

Anti-tobacco advocates and organizations including the NAACP, the American Medical Association, and the American Academy of Pediatrics have called on the Biden administration to stop delaying a final ban on menthol cigarettes in the U.S. after missing a March deadline. Reuters GHN EXCLUSIVE COMMENTARY Oral Health Professionals Positioned to Recognize, Help Trafficking Victims
The hidden nature of trafficking, the difficulty in victim identification, and the need for effective prosecution of perpetrators call for innovative solutions—and oral health professionals can serve as frontline defenders in the global fight against human trafficking, writes Alishah Nadeem, who is pursuing a career in dentistry and public health. 

Dentists, dental hygienists, and assistants are uniquely positioned to recognize signs of trafficking, Nadeem argues, noting:
  • Routine dental visits may be one of the few opportunities for victims to interact with health professionals who can notice signs of abuse or neglect. 

  • Oral and facial signs of abuse, such as trauma or untreated disease, are key indicators that trained professionals can spot. 
What’s needed: Specialized training is essential for oral health professionals to not only recognize and document signs of trafficking but also to report them in a manner that ensures victim safety and facilitates timely interventions. 
Nadeem shares examples of training resources and outlines needs for comprehensive curriculum development and investment in research, and highlights the importance of multidisciplinary collaboration in tackling complex social issues like human trafficking.

Alishah Nadeem for Global Health NOW READ THE FULL COMMENTARY RACISM Pursuing Transplant Equity
More than 14,300 Black kidney transplant candidates are being moved up the priority list for a transplant in an “unprecedented move” to mitigate inequities caused by a racially biased organ test.

The failure: An automated test widely used test for years to evaluate kidney functioning, included an outdated race-based equation—which resulted in overestimating how well Black people’s kidneys were functioning.

Seeking “restorative justice”: The transplant network gave hospitals a year to track down which Black kidney candidates could have qualified for a transplant sooner if not for the race-based test, and adjust their waiting time accordingly.
  • So far, 2,800+ of those people have received a transplant.
The stakes: Black Americans are 3X+ more likely than white people to experience kidney failure. 

AP GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES COMMUNITY HEALTH Partners in Health Pivots to U.S.
After decades of work improving health equity in low- and middle-income countries, the U.S.- based organization Partners in Health (PIH) has a new area of focus: its home turf. 

After a “pandemic turning point,”  the organization launched PIH-US to help bridge gaps in the “fragmented, profit-oriented” U.S. health system.
  • The new program also seeks to flip a global health structure that typically only exports models from richer countries to LMICs. 
Areas of focus: 
  • Assisting community-based organizations.

  • Establishing infrastructure like data systems, staffing, and links to public officials. 

  • Supporting a “cadre of community health workers.”
All-American struggle: “What it would take to really make health a human right in the USA, rather than a commodity for sale, is a long-term and tough challenge,” said Katie Bollbach, executive director of PIH-US.

The Lancet QUICK HITS In Haiti, a phone message can bring relief or agony – BBC

'It's the greatest living experiment': Pitt Men's Study marks 40 years of AIDS research – Medical Xpress

Florida Supreme Court upholds state’s 15-week ban on most abortions, paving way for 6-week ban – STAT

Vulnerable Britons dying as not being given antibiotics at dentist, doctors say – The Guardian

Mpox cases nearly double what they were at the same time last year, CDC says – ABC

People in red states report more COVID vaccine side effects: Study – The Hill

WHO publishes new guidelines on hepatitis B – WHO

For terminal patients, dying in California may get easier – Politico

In a bold bid to avoid open-access fees, Gates foundation says grantees must post preprints – Science

Alaskapox no more: Newly discovered disease and virus is to be called ‘borealpox’ – KTOO Issue No. 2507
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

Please send the Global Health NOW free sign-up link to friends and colleagues: http://www.globalhealthnow.org/subscribe

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  Copyright 2024 Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All Rights Reserved. Views and opinions expressed in Global Health NOW do not necessarily reflect those of the Bloomberg School.


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Categories: Global Health Feed

Global Health NOW: March Recap

Global Health Now - Mon, 04/01/2024 - 09:32
96 Global Health NOW: March Recap View this email in your browser April 1, 2024 Forward Share Post Afghan women walk along a road during a rainfall in Fayzabad, Badakhshan province, on March 21. Omer Abrar/AFP via Getty Taliban Reinstates Stoning as ‘Gender Apartheid’ Takes Hold
The Taliban’s decision to reintroduce the stoning of women to death and public flogging is the outcome of two years of steady erosion of women’s rights in Afghanistan with little international response, reports The Guardian
  • “They tested their draconian policies one by one, and have reached this point because there is no one to hold them accountable for the abuses,” said Sahar Fetrat, an Afghan researcher at Human Rights Watch.
An ‘unparalleled assault’ on rights: The country’s 14 million women and girls have largely disappeared from schools, the legal system, health care, and the workforce. They are confined to the home and early marriage—and are “largely erased from society,” per a commentary in the Washington Post that calls for the Taliban’s actions to be legally classified as “gender apartheid.” 
  • Such a label could provide a legal framing “to cajole a more effective and principled international response”—especially if the U.N. decides to codify  gender apartheid as a crime against humanity, the commentary writers argue.
GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners
4,000+ Madrid nursing home residents died after the regional government blocked transfers to hospitals as COVID-19 surged in 2020, according to a report by a citizen-led commission. The Guardian

The prevalence of ceftriaxone-resistant gonorrhea has nearly tripled since 2017 in China, per a new article in the U.S. CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; ceftriaxone is “essentially the one reliable antibiotic left for treating one of the world's most common sexually transmitted infections.” CIDRAP

A teacher’s union in the U.K. is calling for school leaders to be trained in suicide prevention; the call follows a survey that found nearly nine in 10 teachers said their mental health had been negatively affected by their work in the last year. BBC

The U.S. CDC is warning health care providers about rising numbers of cases of meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y; the bacterium typically affects infants and young adults, but this strain appears to be infecting adults ages 30–60. USA Today MARCH RECAP: MUST-READS The Dangerous U.S. Syphilis Treatment Shortage  
A shortage of a key treatment is hobbling efforts against the U.S. syphilis surge—and endangering babies, ProPublica reports in a must-read story.
  •  In 2022, 3,700+ babies were infected; almost 300 were stillborn or died as infants. 
  • Pfizer, the only U.S. manufacturer of injections to treat syphilis, warned the FDA last June of a yearlong stock-out because of rising infection rates and “competitive shortages.”
  Navigating Autism Care in Kenya
In Kenya, parents of children with autism often struggle to find reliable information and affordable therapy support; they also cope with misconceptions and stigma, e.g., that “autism is caused by witchcraft,” NPR Goats and Soda reports.
  • As a result, many children miss out on early autism diagnosis—and crucial early interventions.  

Newborn Crisis 
In the Western Cape of South Africa, extensive alcohol use during pregnancy has led to the world’s highest rate of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders—reaching up to 31% (the global average is 0.7%).
  • Easy access to alcohol, unplanned pregnancies, and lingering effects of the (now banned) practice of paying farm workers in wine all contribute, per The Telegraph.
  Pitting Parents Against Public Health 
A growing number of Tennessee children are at risk of missing key vaccinations after a new “medical freedom” law took effect in the state—requiring direct consent of birth parents or legal guardians for every childhood vaccination, KFF Health News reports
  • Foster parents, social workers, grandparents, and other caregivers who take babies and children to routine appointments have no authority to get them vaccinated. 
  How Nonprofits are Bridging the Pharma Gap
The emergence of two new game-changing drugs late last year—one to protect against gonorrhea, the other to treat fungal mycetoma—heralds new hope for the fight against antimicrobial resistance and fungal disease, and a new vision for the drug making process, per Nature
  • The force behind both drug trials: nonprofit organizations with missions that “hope to fill a big gap” in drug development and access as most legacy pharmaceutical companies withdraw from antimicrobial drug discovery. 
GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES MARCH'S BEST NEWS A Possible Game-Changer Against Ebola Sudan Infections  
The antiviral drug obeldesivir, an oral pill, showed promise in curbing Ebola Sudan infections—which currently have no approved vaccines or treatments—in a small study in of primates published March 15 in Science.

Why it’s exciting: Obeldesivir is easy to administer, can be stored at room temperature, and is relatively inexpensive. APRIL FOOLS' DIVERSION Global Hijinks NOW
Committed as we are to public health, it’s our job today to remind you to watch your back. And your shoelaces. And also your salt shakers and sugar bowls. 

It is, after all, April 1. 

April Fools’ Day origins are appropriately tricky to pin down. One reporter who wrote a story on its history in 1983 reached out to a Boston University historian—who promptly duped the reporter into believing an elaborate fake story involving a medieval court jester named Kugel, according to CBS
  • The tradition most likely dates back to the shift to the Gregorian calendar from the Julian calendar—which started the new year around April 1, reports USA Today.
Worldwide hoodwinking, per The Standard
  • In France: Children tape paper fish—”poisson d’avril”— to the backs of the gullible.
  • In Scotland: Fake tails and “kick me” signs materialize around people’s backsides on what’s called “Tailie Day.” 
  • In New York: A nonexistent April Fools’ Day Parade has been announced every year since 1986.
We’ll do our best to watch out for suspect stories today—like this 1957 classic BBC broadcast about Italians harvesting spaghetti from alpine trees. QUICK HITS FDA issues highest-level alert for heart pumps connected to 49 reported deaths – The Hill

US reports 2023 rise in TB cases, incidence – CIDRAP

Most sudden infant deaths involved unsafe sleep habits, study finds – The Washington Post

Mila’s legacy: The little girl who could change how medicines are made in Britain – Telegraph

Anthrax alert in Thailand after Laos reports over 50 cases – Times of India

The Lancet and colonialism: past, present, and future - The Lancet (registration required)

Ed Yong: When I Became a Birder, Almost Everything Else Fell Into Place – New York Times (commentary) M-Mar-2024
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

Please send the Global Health NOW free sign-up link to friends and colleagues: http://www.globalhealthnow.org/subscribe

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SUPPORT US
NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE
  CONTACT US
  Copyright 2024 Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All Rights Reserved. Views and opinions expressed in Global Health NOW do not necessarily reflect those of the Bloomberg School.


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Categories: Global Health Feed

Global Health NOW: Taliban Reinstates Stoning; and March's Must-Reads

Global Health Now - Mon, 04/01/2024 - 09:04
96 Global Health NOW: Taliban Reinstates Stoning; and March's Must-Reads The Dangerous U.S. Syphilis Treatment Shortage; Navigating Autism Care in Kenya; and Pitting Parents Against Public Health View this email in your browser April 1, 2024 Forward Share Post Afghan women walk along a road during a rainfall in Fayzabad, Badakhshan province, on March 21. Omer Abrar/AFP via Getty Taliban Reinstates Stoning as ‘Gender Apartheid’ Takes Hold
The Taliban’s decision to reintroduce the stoning of women to death and public flogging is the outcome of two years of steady erosion of women’s rights in Afghanistan with little international response, reports The Guardian
  • “They tested their draconian policies one by one, and have reached this point because there is no one to hold them accountable for the abuses,” said Sahar Fetrat, an Afghan researcher at Human Rights Watch.
An ‘unparalleled assault’ on rights: The country’s 14 million women and girls have largely disappeared from schools, the legal system, health care, and the workforce. They are confined to the home and early marriage—and are “largely erased from society,” per a commentary in the Washington Post that calls for the Taliban’s actions to be legally classified as “gender apartheid.” 
  • Such a label could provide a legal framing “to cajole a more effective and principled international response”—especially if the U.N. decides to codify  gender apartheid as a crime against humanity, the commentary writers argue.
GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners
4,000+ Madrid nursing home residents died after the regional government blocked transfers to hospitals as COVID-19 surged in 2020, according to a report by a citizen-led commission. The Guardian

The prevalence of ceftriaxone-resistant gonorrhea has nearly tripled since 2017 in China, per a new article in the U.S. CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; ceftriaxone is “essentially the one reliable antibiotic left for treating one of the world's most common sexually transmitted infections.” CIDRAP

A teacher’s union in the U.K. is calling for school leaders to be trained in suicide prevention; the call follows a survey that found nearly nine in 10 teachers said their mental health had been negatively affected by their work in the last year. BBC

The U.S. CDC is warning health care providers about rising numbers of cases of meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y; the bacterium typically affects infants and young adults, but this strain appears to be infecting adults ages 30–60. USA Today MARCH RECAP: MUST-READS The Dangerous U.S. Syphilis Treatment Shortage  
A shortage of a key treatment is hobbling efforts against the U.S. syphilis surge—and endangering babies, ProPublica reports in a must-read story.
  •  In 2022, 3,700+ babies were infected; almost 300 were stillborn or died as infants. 
  • Pfizer, the only U.S. manufacturer of injections to treat syphilis, warned the FDA last June of a yearlong stock-out because of rising infection rates and “competitive shortages.”
  Navigating Autism Care in Kenya
In Kenya, parents of children with autism often struggle to find reliable information and affordable therapy support; they also cope with misconceptions and stigma, e.g., that “autism is caused by witchcraft,” NPR Goats and Soda reports.
  • As a result, many children miss out on early autism diagnosis—and crucial early interventions.  

Newborn Crisis 
In the Western Cape of South Africa, extensive alcohol use during pregnancy has led to the world’s highest rate of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders—reaching up to 31% (the global average is 0.7%).
  • Easy access to alcohol, unplanned pregnancies, and lingering effects of the (now banned) practice of paying farm workers in wine all contribute, per The Telegraph.
  Pitting Parents Against Public Health 
A growing number of Tennessee children are at risk of missing key vaccinations after a new “medical freedom” law took effect in the state—requiring direct consent of birth parents or legal guardians for every childhood vaccination, KFF Health News reports
  • Foster parents, social workers, grandparents, and other caregivers who take babies and children to routine appointments have no authority to get them vaccinated. 
  How Nonprofits are Bridging the Pharma Gap
The emergence of two new game-changing drugs late last year—one to protect against gonorrhea, the other to treat fungal mycetoma—heralds new hope for the fight against antimicrobial resistance and fungal disease, and a new vision for the drug making process, per Nature
  • The force behind both drug trials: nonprofit organizations with missions that “hope to fill a big gap” in drug development and access as most legacy pharmaceutical companies withdraw from antimicrobial drug discovery. 
GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES MARCH'S BEST NEWS A Possible Game-Changer Against Ebola Sudan Infections  
The antiviral drug obeldesivir, an oral pill, showed promise in curbing Ebola Sudan infections—which currently have no approved vaccines or treatments—in a small study in of primates published March 15 in Science.

Why it’s exciting: Obeldesivir is easy to administer, can be stored at room temperature, and is relatively inexpensive. APRIL FOOLS' DIVERSION Global Hijinks NOW
Committed as we are to public health, it’s our job today to remind you to watch your back. And your shoelaces. And also your salt shakers and sugar bowls. 

It is, after all, April 1. 

April Fools’ Day origins are appropriately tricky to pin down. One reporter who wrote a story on its history in 1983 reached out to a Boston University historian—who promptly duped the reporter into believing an elaborate fake story involving a medieval court jester named Kugel, according to CBS News
  • The tradition most likely dates back to the shift to the Gregorian calendar from the Julian calendar—which started the new year around April 1, reports USA Today.
Worldwide hoodwinking, per The Standard
  • In France: Children tape paper fish—”poisson d’avril”— to the backs of the gullible.
  • In Scotland: Fake tails and “kick me” signs materialize around people’s backsides on what’s called “Tailie Day.” 
  • In New York: A nonexistent April Fools’ Day Parade has been announced every year since 1986.
We’ll do our best to watch out for suspect stories today—like this 1957 classic BBC broadcast about Italians harvesting spaghetti from alpine trees. QUICK HITS FDA issues highest-level alert for heart pumps connected to 49 reported deaths – The Hill

US reports 2023 rise in TB cases, incidence – CIDRAP

Most sudden infant deaths involved unsafe sleep habits, study finds – The Washington Post

Mila’s legacy: The little girl who could change how medicines are made in Britain – Telegraph

Anthrax alert in Thailand after Laos reports over 50 cases – Times of India

The Lancet and colonialism: past, present, and future - The Lancet (registration required)

Ed Yong: When I Became a Birder, Almost Everything Else Fell Into Place – New York Times (commentary) Issue No. 2506
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

Please send the Global Health NOW free sign-up link to friends and colleagues: http://www.globalhealthnow.org/subscribe

Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list. -->
ABOUT
SUPPORT US
NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE
  CONTACT US
  Copyright 2024 Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All Rights Reserved. Views and opinions expressed in Global Health NOW do not necessarily reflect those of the Bloomberg School.


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You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
Categories: Global Health Feed

CNNTD Spring Newsletter |RCMTN Bulletin de Printemps

CNNTD Newsletter - Thu, 03/28/2024 - 16:31
96 CNNTD Spring Newsletter |RCMTN Bulletin de Printemps Recent news and updates from CNNTD | Nouvelles et mises à jour récentes du RCMTN View this email in your browser March 28, 2024 / Mars 28, 2024 Canadian Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases Newsletter /
Bulletin d'information du Réseau canadien pour les
Maladies Tropicales Négligées
--> Opportunities with the Canadian Network for NTDs/
 Opportunités avec le Réseau canadien pour les MTN
--> There's still time to apply to our 2024 Student & Young Professionals Ambassadorship for NTDs!/
 Il est encore temps de postuler à notre programme 2024 d'ambassadeurs étudiants et jeunes professionnels pour les MTN!
It's time to get creative and apply to our NTD Student and Young Professionals Ambassadorship video competition! To apply, applicants must be a Canadian citizen, permanent resident or currently a student in Canada and between 16-29 years old. To learn more about how to apply, please follow the link below.  ... Il est temps de faire preuve de créativité et de poser votre candidature à notre concours vidéo d'ambassadeurs pour les étudiants et les jeunes professionnels atteints de MTN! Pour postuler, les candidats doivent être citoyens canadiens, résidents permanents ou étudiants au Canada et être âgés de 16 à 29 ans. Pour en savoir plus sur les modalités de candidature, veuillez suivre le lien ci-dessous.  Apply Now/ Postuler --> Join the Canadian Network for NTDs Steering Committee!/
Rejoignez le comité directeur du Réseau canadien pour les MTN ! 
The Canadian Network for NTDs is seeking new Steering Committee Members to support NTD advocacy and engagement here in Canada! Applications are due March 31st, 2024. To learn more, please visit our webpage for this opportunity.
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Le Réseau canadien pour les MTN est à la recherche de nouveaux membres du comité directeur pour soutenir le plaidoyer et l'engagement en faveur des MTN ici au Canada ! La date limite de dépôt des candidatures est fixée au 31 mars 2024. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez visiter notre page web pour cette opportunité. Apply Now/ Postuler --> Apply to our NTD Research Award 2024!/
Postulez à notre prix de recherche sur les MTN!
We are bringing our NTD Research Award back again this year! Eligible submissions include NTD papers published in English, French or Spanish in a peer-reviewed journal in 2023 in partnership with a Canadian Institution. The deadline for submissions is April 30, 2023 at midnight EST.
...
Le prix de la recherche sur les MTN est de nouveau décerné cette année! Les candidatures admissibles comprennent les articles sur les MTN publiés en anglais, en français ou en espagnol dans une revue à comité de lecture en 2023, en partenariat avec une institution canadienne. La date limite de soumission est le 30 avril 2023 à minuit HNE. Apply Now/ Postuler --> G7 NTD Advocacy Letter / Lettre de plaidoyer du G7 sur les MTN NTD organizations in all G7 countries have come together to deliver this joint advocacy letter for the G7 Summit in June. It advocates for all G7 countries to invest 1% of their global health Official Development Assistance (ODA) towards NTD prevention and treatment. Take a look at this joint letter in the link below.
...
Les organisations de lutte contre les MTN de tous les pays du G7 se sont réunies pour rédiger une lettre de plaidoyer commune à l'intention du sommet du G7 en juin. Elle demande à tous les pays du G7 d'investir 1 % de l'aide étrangère en matière de santé mondiale dans la prévention et le traitement des MTN. Vous pouvez consulter cette lettre commune en cliquant sur le lien ci-dessous. G7 NTD Advocacy Letter/ Lettre de plaidoyer du G7 sur les MTN --> Joint Letter to Minister Ahmed Hussen sent on World NTD Day / Lettre conjointe au ministre Ahmed Hussen envoyée à l'occasion de la Journée mondiale des MTN Take a look at our Joint letter of invitation to meet with Minister Ahmed Hussen – sent on World NTD Day in collaboration with Effect Hope, Neglected Global Diseases Initiative-UBC, Orbis Canada, Operation Eyesight, WaterAid Canada, Bruyère Research Institute
...
Jetez un coup d'œil à notre lettre d'invitation conjointe à rencontrer le ministre Ahmed Hussen - envoyée à l'occasion de la Journée mondiale des MTN en collaboration avec Effect Hope, NGDI-UBC, Orbis Canada, Operation Eyesight, WaterAid Canada, Institut de recherche Bruyère   --> USAID Commits $114.5 m Towards NTDs in 2024 / L'USAID s'engage à consacrer 114,5 millions de dollars aux MTN en 2024 Good news for NTDs! The US has consistently committed resources to support countries' NTD elimination strategies, and will continue to sustain funding for NTDs in 2024. To learn more, please see this LinkedIn post.
...
Bonnes nouvelles pour les MTN! Les États-Unis ont toujours engagé des ressources pour soutenir les stratégies d'élimination des MTN des pays, et continueront à soutenir le financement des MTN en 2024. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez consulter ce post LinkedIn. --> Check out our World NTD Day Engagement!/ Découvrez notre engagement lors de la Journée mondiale de lutte contre les MTN! 
  • Canadian Network for NTDs World NTD Day Video / Vidéo de la Journée mondiale des MTN du Réseau canadien pour les MTN
  • Why we act to Eliminate NTDs /pourquoi nous agissons pour éliminer les MTN
  • Press Release - World NTD Day 2024: Ongoing Canadian Engagement is Needed to End Neglected Tropical Diseases /Communiqué de presse - Journée mondiale des MTN 2024: L'engagement continu du Canada est nécessaire pour mettre fin aux maladies tropicales négligées
  • Today is neglected tropical diseases day | CP24.com A  conversation with Dr. Isaac Bogoch, a Toronto-based infectious diseases specialist about what NTDs are and what they mean for Canadians and globally / Aujourd'hui est la journée des maladies tropicales négligées | CP24.com Une conversation avec le Dr Isaac Bogoch, spécialiste des maladies infectieuses basé à Toronto, sur ce que sont les MTN et ce qu'elles signifient pour les Canadiens et à l'échelle mondiale.
  • The Global Effort to Eliminate Neglected Tropical Diseases, All in A Day, CBC A conversation with Alan Neal and Alison Krentel, PhD, Chair of the Canadian Network for NTDs, aired January 30th, 2024 / The Global Effort to Eliminate Neglected Tropical Diseases, All in A Day, CBC Une conversation avec Alan Neal et Alison Krentel, PhD, présidente du Réseau canadien pour les MTN, diffusée le 30 janvier 2024.
  • When we Treat a Community, Who Gets Left Behind? A blog post on the BRI website about Alison Krentel’s research on never-treated communities posted on World NTD Day/ Quand nous traitons une communauté, qui est laissé pour compte? Un article de blog sur le site web de l'IRB concernant la recherche d'Alison Krentel sur les communautés jamais traitées, publié à l'occasion de la Journée mondiale des MTN.
--> Recording of our Canadian Engagement in Global Trachoma Elimination Strategies Webinar!/  
Enregistrement de notre webinaire sur l'engagement canadien dans les stratégies mondiales d'élimination du trachome!
Canadian Engagement in Global Trachoma Elimination Strategies virtual event recording in partnership with Orbis Canada, January 23, 2024
...
Enregistrement de l'événement virtuel sur l'engagement canadien dans les stratégies d'élimination du trachome à l'échelle mondiale en partenariat avec Orbis Canada, 23 janvier 2024. --> WHO call for nominations of Experts to its Diagnostic Technical Advisory Group (DTAG) for NTDs / L'OMS lance un appel à la nomination d'experts pour son Groupe consultatif technique sur le diagnostic pour les MTN  Click here to learn more / Cliquez ici pour en savoir plus --> Clean Water, Clear Vision/ Eau propre, vision claire  The link between water and eye health by Operation Eyesight Canada, highlighting the SAFE strategy for trachoma work in Ethiopia, Zambia and Kenya.
...
Le lien entre l'eau et la santé oculaire par Operation Eyesight Canada, mettant en évidence la stratégie SAFE pour le travail sur le trachome en Éthiopie, en Zambie et au Kenya. --> Member Mondays! / Lundis des Membres! In April, we will start Member Mondays, where we will feature a member of the Network each Monday on social media! To participate, please complete this brief form.
...
En avril, nous lancerons les Lundis des membres, au cours desquels nous présenterons un membre du réseau chaque lundi sur les médias sociaux! Pour participer, veuillez remplir ce bref formulaire. Click here to learn more / Cliquez ici pour en savoir plus --> Research /Recherche  

Canadian researchers are making a difference to NTDs. Listed are publications from Canadian-affiliated authors published since January 1st,  2024. Canadian-affiliated authors are bolded. Have we missed something? Let us know by sending an email

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Les chercheurs canadiens font une différence dans le domaine des MTN. Les publications des auteurs affiliés au Canada publiées depuis 1er janvier 2024. Les auteurs affiliés au Canada sont en gras
Avons-nous manqué quelque chose? Faites-le nous savoir en nous envoyant un courriel.

Agazi Fitsum Gebreselassie, Natnael Shimelash, Kallon, A., Mkondo, G., Huston, T. and Schurer, J.M. (2024). ‘We no longer experience the same pain’: a cross-sectional study assessing the impact of Heart and Sole Africa’s podoconiosis prevention education program. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/trae007.

Bernardo, L., Ana Victoria Ibarra-Meneses, Noelie Douanne, Corbeil, A., Jose Carlos Solana, Beaudry, F., Carrillo, E., Moreno, J. and Fernandez-Prada, C. (2024). Potential selection of antimony and methotrexate cross-resistance in Leishmania infantum circulating strains. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 18(2), pp.e0012015–e0012015. doi:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0012015.

Heidema, S., Stoepker, I.V., Flaherty, G., Angelo, K.M., Post, R.A.J., Miller, C., Libman, M., Hamer, D.H., van den Heuvel, E.R. and Huits, R. (2024). From GeoSentinel data to epidemiological insights: a multidisciplinary effort towards artificial intelligence-supported detection of infectious disease outbreaks. Journal of Travel Medicine, [online] p.taae013. doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taae013.

Liblik, K., Ioana Tereza Florica and Baranchuk, A. (2024). Original algorithms for the detection of cardiovascular involvement of neglected tropical diseases. Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy. doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/14779072.2024.2315090.

Perera, D.J., Cal Koger-Pease, Paulini, K., Daoudi, M. and Momar Ndao (2024). Beyond schistosomiasis: unraveling co-infections and altered immunity. Clinical Microbiology Reviews. doi:https://doi.org/10.1128/cmr.00098-23. Poorinmohammad, N. and Salavati, R. (2024). Prioritization of Trypanosoma brucei editosome protein interactions interfaces at residue resolution through proteome-scale network analysis. BMC molecular and cell biology, [online] 25(1), p.3. doi:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12860-024-00499-4.

Shuaibu Abdullahi Hudu, Abdulgafar Olayiwola Jimoh, Kehinde Ahmad Adeshina, Edith Ginika Otalike, Tahir, A. and Abdelmonem Awad Hegazy (2024). An Insight into the Success, Challenges, and Future Perspectives of Eliminating Neglected Tropical Disease. Scientific African, pp.e02165–e02165. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sciaf.2024.e02165.

Singer, B.J., Coulibaly, J.T., Park, H.J., Andrews, J.R., Bogoch, I.I. and Lo, N.C. (2024). Development of prediction models to identify hotspots of schistosomiasis in endemic regions to guide mass drug administration. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, [online] 121(2), p.e2315463120. doi:https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2315463120.

Zewude, R.T., Corbeil, A., Fung, S., Moulton, C.-A. and Bogoch, I.I. (2024). Alveolar Echinococcus in a 70-year-old man in Ontario. Journal of the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada = Journal Officiel De l’Association Pour La Microbiologie Medicale Et L’infectiologie Canada, [online] 8(4), pp.336–342. doi:https://doi.org/10.3138/jammi-2023-0012. --> Save the date for upcoming events / 
Gardez la date pour les événements à venir

17 April 2024 - ASTMH call for abstracts due
18 April 2024 - adaptation to climate change-driven infectious disease risks in Canada webinar
21 April 2024 - NNN workshop submissions due
14-15 May 2024 - Healthy World Conference: Dialogues on Health, Gender & Climate
16 May 2024 - MSF Scientific Days
12 June 2024 - CSPS/CC-CRS Annual Symposium
1-3 October 2024 -  Annual NNN Conference, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

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17 avril 2024 - date limite pour l'appel à résumés de l'SAMTH
18 avril 2024 - webinaire sur l'adaptation aux risques de maladies infectieuses liés au changement climatique au Canada
21 avril 2024 - Date limite de soumission des propositions pour l'atelier NNN
14-15 mai 2024 - Conférence un monde en bonne santé: Dialogues sur la santé, le genre et le climat
16 mai 2024 - Journées scientifiques de la MSF
12 Juin 2024 - Symposium Annuel CSPS/CC-CRS
1-3 octobre 2024 - conférence annuelle du NNN, Kuala Lumpur, Malaisie 

--> Join us! Rejoignez-nous! The Canadian Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases welcomes individual, organizational and international members. Find out about the benefits of membership and join CNNTD.  --- Le Réseau canadien des maladies tropicales négligées accueille des membres individuels, organisationnels et internationaux. Découvrez les avantages de l'adhésion et rejoignez le RCMTN. Copyright © 2024 Canadian Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases, All rights reserved.


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Categories: Global Health Feed

Global Health NOW: The Looming Specter of Smallpox; A Tale of Two Methadone Models; and A Poisonous Search for Wealth

Global Health Now - Thu, 03/28/2024 - 09:50
96 Global Health NOW: The Looming Specter of Smallpox; A Tale of Two Methadone Models; and A Poisonous Search for Wealth Smallpox threat persists, and the U.S. is not prepared. View this email in your browser March 28, 2024 Forward Share Post Nurses prepare a boy to have a smallpox vaccination, circa 1950 in New York. European Picture Service/FPG/Archive Photos/Getty The Looming Specter of Smallpox
It has been over 40 years since the eradication of smallpox—but its threat persists, with U.S. preparedness gaps made stark by the COVID-19 pandemic and mpox outbreak.

That’s the conclusion of a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, which calls for the U.S. to bolster its resources in preparation for an accidental or natural resurgence of smallpox—or bioterrorism, reports CIDRAP

State of play: 
  • Live samples of the smallpox-causing variola orthopox virus are under lock and key in labs in just two countries: the U.S. and Russia. 
  • But scientists acknowledge that genetic engineering raises the “possibility of deliberate re-creation and misuse” of the virus elsewhere. 
Recommendations:
  • Create a smallpox research and development roadmap.
  • Invest in diagnostics, vaccines, and therapeutics.
  • Conduct risk-benefit analyses as technologies evolve.
  • Assess supply chain and manufacturing readiness. 
The Quote: “Even one case would be a public health emergency. And so we need to maintain readiness,” the report’s co-author Nahid Bhadelia told Science.  EDITORS NOTE We’re Taking Tomorrow Off
GHN will not be publishing tomorrow, but we will see you Monday—April Fool’s Day—with more news, and maybe a prank or two.Annalies GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners
Thailand’s lower house of Parliament passed a bill by a large majority that legalizes same-sex marriage; Senate approval and a royal endorsement of the historic legislation are expected by the end of the year. AP
 
A heatwave in South Sudan has sent temperatures soaring to 45C (113F), closing schools for 2.2 million children, causing heat-related deaths, and breaking hospital equipment. The Telegraph

It’s possible to improve the immune systems of old mice by using antibodies to trim back a population of stem cells that has a role in inflammation, per a Nature article published yesterday; it will likely be years before the technique can be tested in humans. Nature
 
European countries are looking to close regulatory loopholes following tobacco companies’ launch of “zero-tobacco heat sticks”; Philip Morris and British American tobacco rolled out the nicotine-containing sticks late last year after an EU ban on flavored, heated tobacco products. Reuters ADDICTION A Tale of Two Methadone Models 
After years of battling a drug use and overdose crisis, Switzerland has emerged as a “model for a highly effective, evidence-based policy” response to addiction treatment.

At Swiss addiction treatment centers: All patients in need of care are given instant access to weeks’ worth of a variety of medications like methadone or morphine. 

Meanwhile, in the U.S.: Just two medications are approved to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms, and methadone doses are dispensed daily to patients who agree to a slate of requirements. 

By the numbers: The opioid death rate in Switzerland ~5% of the U.S. rate. 

However: There are “stark differences” between European and U.S. addiction crises—including the fact that most European countries have universal health insurance to help carry the burden. 

STAT GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES SNAKEBITES Adjusting Antivenom Supply
Brazil is a country with a high rate of venomous snakebites—but it also has a robust supply of antivenom, which it supplies free of charge. 

And yet: Data show that it can take hours or days for people bitten by snakes to reach hospitals that have antivenom—leading to potential limb or organ damage, or death. 

The problem: Antivenom supplies are concentrated in large cities, far from the country's snakebite hotspots. 

The answer: Redistributing antivenoms to rural health clinics would be “both cost-effective and lifesaving,” per a new mathematical modeling analysis published in The Lancet. 

Think Global Health ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH A Poisonous Search for Wealth
Zimbabwe’s Penhalonga river—once a water source for people, livestock, and crops—is now heavily polluted. Illegal gold miners have razed acres of vegetation, clogged and redirected streams with dams and waste materials, and poisoned water sources with mercury.

Exposure to even small amounts of the neurotoxin—used to extract gold from the ground—may cause serious health problems in the nervous, digestive, and immune systems, and threaten child development.
  • One 2020 study revealed that in the Kadoma region, women residing in mining areas were exposed to mercury or when working with the chemical, resulting in breastfed children being exposed.
Zimbabwe banned the use of the toxin in gold mining in 2020. Yet artisanal and small-scale gold mining, experts say, are the country’s greatest sources of anthropogenic mercury pollution. 

The Telegraph QUICK HITS IOM report: 1 in 3 migrant deaths occurs in transit while fleeing conflict – UN News

WHO calls for greater attention to violence against women with disabilities and older women – WHO

HIV Cure Nearer With Way to 'Shock and Kill' Latent Virus – Newsweek

Roche wins FDA approval for first test to detect malaria in blood donors – Medical Device Network

Two nights of broken sleep can make people feel years older, finds study – The Guardian

What’s 95% safer than tobacco? Not vapes, say experts – Bhekisisa

How scientists traced a mysterious covid case back to six toilets – MIT Technology Review Issue No. 2505
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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Categories: Global Health Feed

Global Health NOW: Pandemic Prevention: An ‘Ecological Problem’; Sound Concept for Disease Detection; and Flying for Life

Global Health Now - Wed, 03/27/2024 - 09:09
96 Global Health NOW: Pandemic Prevention: An ‘Ecological Problem’; Sound Concept for Disease Detection; and Flying for Life Shoring up pandemic defenses in labs and hospitals is good, but don't forget jungles and forests. View this email in your browser March 27, 2024 Forward Share Post A grey-headed Flying-fox (Pteropus poliocephalus), a native Australian bat, stretches its leathery wings as it flies over Sydney, on August 17, 2005. Greg Wood/AFP via Getty Pandemic Prevention: An ‘Ecological Problem’
While countries shore up pandemic defenses in labs and hospitals, an international group of researchers say more work must be done in jungles and forests.

As wildlife habitats like these become degraded, animals like bats are forced into increased contact with humans—leading to heightened danger of spillover. 
  • “The genesis of the pandemic is actually an ecological problem,” said Raina Plowright, lead author of a new perspective paper in Nature Communications.
A ‘One Health’ approach: Human health cannot be viewed in isolation: environment, microorganisms, and wildlife are all linked, argue the paper’s 24 contributors. 

Researchers’ recommendations, using bats as an example: 
  • Protect where and what animals eat: Stable food sources mean bats will be less likely to resort to scouring human environments. 
  • Protect animal habitats: Safeguarding caves and canopies where bats congregate can buffer against human encounters and reduce stress that can lead to viral shedding. 
  • Protect people at risk: Communities who have contact with wildlife as part of their culture or vocation need extra training and adequate gear like masks and PPE. 
NPR Goats and Soda 

Related: Study finds that humans pass on more viruses to their pets than they give to us — The Independent  GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners
A combination antibiotic targeting multidrug-resistant bacteria has been recommended for approval by a European Medicines Agency committee, Pfizer has announced. CIDRAP

Genetically altered marmoset monkeys could provide researchers with “transformative” new insights into the onset of Parkinson’s disease and its early progression. Science

Ukrainian adolescents exposed to war conditions are “more likely to screen positive for psychiatric conditions,” including depression, anxiety, trauma, eating disorders, and substance use disorders, according to a new study that included 8,096 Ukrainian adolescents. JAMA Pediatrics

An archive of ancient brains unearthed from northern European peat bogs to Andean mountaintops could give researchers new clues into the history of brain diseases and mental illness. CNN RESEARCH A Sound Concept for Disease Detection 
Google scientists and Zambian researchers are working on an AI system that uses sound as a disease biomarker by evaluating coughing and breathing noises. 

The system, Health Acoustic Representations (HeAR) was trained using more than 300 million sound clips from YouTube. 

On a scale where 1 is 100% accurate and 0.5 is equal to random prediction:
  • HeAR scored up to 0.710 for COVID-19 detection.
  • HeAR received 0.739 for tuberculosis detection. 

Ultimate goal: HeAR may one day be used by physicians to diagnose illness.

Today’s reality: HeAR’s results were shared earlier this month in a preprint article that hasn’t yet been peer-reviewed. 

Nature GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES CONFLICT Flying for Life 
As medical resources in Gaza remain scarce, small numbers of injured people are being airlifted to hospitals in countries like Qatar, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and Italy. 

Photographer Nariman El-Mofty joined 16 Gazan children and their caretakers on one such journey, creating a powerful documentary essay of their evacuation on an Italian military flight from Cario to Rome—then to a hospital in Bologna, where the children are receiving treatment. 

Limbo: Even as the children heal, their caretakers agonize about what awaits them next: “There is nothing to go back to,” said a grandmother of a 5-year-old being treated for a shrapnel injury. “Our children can’t eat, they keep crying. No food, no flour.”

The New York Times (gift link) QUICK HITS  Top UK public health official advised vape giant Juul, documents reveal – The Examination

Beni kōji: One dead and dozens sick after taking red yeast pill in Japan – BBC

Dairy cattle in Texas and Kansas test positive for bird flu – AP

Stigma, lack of awareness holding back use of HIV prevention pills, experts say – Spotlight   Youth exodus to India leaves Bajura villages with ageing, ailing residents – Kathmandu Post

Thailand starts aid deliveries to Myanmar – Anadolu Agency

How Design Promotes Better Mental Health for Children – Bloomberg CityLab Issue No. 2504
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

Please send the Global Health NOW free sign-up link to friends and colleagues: http://www.globalhealthnow.org/subscribe

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Categories: Global Health Feed

Global Health NOW: The Vast Implications of the Mifepristone Case; The Struggle to Slow Syphilis; and A War on Women

Global Health Now - Tue, 03/26/2024 - 09:07
96 Global Health NOW: The Vast Implications of the Mifepristone Case; The Struggle to Slow Syphilis; and A War on Women SCOTUS mifepristone case could result in what is essentially a nationwide ban on abortion View this email in your browser March 26, 2024 Forward Share Post Packages of Mifepristone tablets are displayed at a family planning clinic in Rockville, Maryland, on April 13, 2023. Anna Moneymaker/Getty The Vast Implications of the Mifepristone Case
Today the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments over access to the abortion drug mifepristone in a case that legal experts warn could result in what is essentially a nationwide ban on abortion, reports USA Today.

The case: Abortion opponents are hoping to ban the dispensing of mifepristone via mail, pointing to a 1873 obscenity law called the Comstock Act, which prohibits mailing “lewd or lascivious” material, as well as abortion-causing implements.
  • The case also challenges the FDA, saying it improperly relaxed requirements on prescription rules for political reasons. 
Hanging in the balance: A ruling that banned the mailing of abortion drugs and tools could prevent such materials from being shipped directly to women—but also to doctors and clinics. 
  • “That interpretation could shut down all abortions,” said David S. Cohen, a law professor at Drexel University. 
  • And: A new study published in JAMA finds that ~26,000 additional Americans used pills for at-home abortions in the 6 months after Roe was overturned, reports The Guardian.
Effect on the FDA: Reversing the FDA’s decision could also “upend and politicize” the agency’s regulatory process for pharmaceuticals—and have a chilling effect on drug development, reports STAT.

Related: Number of Black women who say they are scared of having children rises – The Hill GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners
Cholera has killed 54 people in Somalia this year, and children make up 59% of all 4,388 cases in the country, according to Save the Children. VOA

Puerto Rico has declared a dengue epidemic as a spike in cases continues to rise; 549 cases have been reported so far this year, with 340 people hospitalized. ABC News 

Obstetric wards in China are closing as the country’s birth rate continues to decline, with medical experts warning of an “obstetric winter” as wards reduce hours and gradually shut down. Al Jazeera

While spillover of viruses from animals to people is a longstanding concern, University College London researchers have found humans pass 2X as many viruses to animals, according to a study published yesterday in Nature Ecology & Evolution. STIs The Struggle to Slow Syphilis
As U.S. syphilis infections continue to climb, no demographic has felt the impact like Native Americans.
  • CDC data released in January show that the rate of congenital syphilis among American Indians and Alaska Natives was 12X the rate for white babies. 
Factors: 
  • Lack of prenatal care: Native Americans are more likely to live in regions far from obstetric facilities than any other racial or ethnic group.
  • Mistrust: Many Native women say health care providers fail to understand their culture.
Interventions: 
  • Tribal leaders have asked federal officials to declare a public health emergency to expand staffing, funding, and contact tracing capacities.
  • Indian Health Service is recommending that all patients be tested yearly for syphilis, and that pregnant patients be tested three times over the course of a pregnancy.
NPR Shots

Related: Why is Syphilis Spiking in the U.S.? – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES VIOLENCE A War on Women
As Sudan’s bloody internal conflict rages on, the nation’s women face the constant threat of a gruesome weapon of war: sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV).
  • More than four million women and girls are at risk of SGBV in Sudan, according to the WHO.
  • From April to December 2023, all types of SGBV increased—including mass rapes, domestic violence, and sexual slavery—per the UN. 
  • Since April 2023, the Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa has tracked more than 104 cases of missing women and girls. 
More than 10 million people are internally displaced in Sudan—and the women and girls among them are especially vulnerable to SGBV while in temporary shelters, crossing borders, or fleeing between states for safety. Those belonging to ethnic African Masalit communities are particularly at risk—targeted by the Arab-dominated Rapid Support Forces.
 
Sudan’s collapsing health care system means access to contraception is minimal, leaving women with the sole option to seek methods to prevent rape.

Think Global Health QUICK HITS ‘It’s Causing Them to Drop Out of Life’: How Phones Warped Gen Z – Politico

The quiet crisis of older men in a world embracing mental health – Seattle Times

To fight malaria parasite, researchers try tricking it with a time-travel strategy – USF Health

Bird Flu Strikes Vietnam: Health Ministry Confirms Student's Death From H5N1 – NDTV

AHA: Sustainable cities ‘ground zero’ for transforming global heart health – Healio

To Make Water Last, Kenyans Build Sand Dams – VOA

Pregnancy may increase biological age by 2 years—though some people end up ‘younger’ – Science Issue No. 2503
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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  Copyright 2024 Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All Rights Reserved. Views and opinions expressed in Global Health NOW do not necessarily reflect those of the Bloomberg School.


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Categories: Global Health Feed

Meet the 3MT|MT180 finalists!

McGill Faculty of Medicine news - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 15:41

Clinical Workshop
April 3, 2024, 3:00pm to 5:00 pm

 

Who can best present their research and make it resonate for a live audience, all in three minutes and with a single slide?

Categories: Global Health Feed

Global Health NOW: Mpox’s Deadly Spread in DRC; Shifting Trafficking Trends; and Misinformation Clouds Contraceptive Use

Global Health Now - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 09:07
96 Global Health NOW: Mpox’s Deadly Spread in DRC; Shifting Trafficking Trends; and Misinformation Clouds Contraceptive Use DRC’s mpox outbreak is expanding, and children are most affected. View this email in your browser March 25, 2024 Forward Share Post Colorized transmission electron micrograph of mpox virus particles (blue) found within an infected cell (red), cultured in the laboratory. NIH-NIAID/IMAGE POINT FR/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Mpox’s Deadly Spread in DRC  
DRC’s mpox outbreak has expanded to all but three of the country’s 26 provinces—and children are most affected, CIDRAP reports, citing a Friday WHO press briefing.
  • The DRC has reported 3,941 suspected mpox cases this year—including 271 deaths. 
  • Children account for two-thirds of the cases.
  • The clade 1 virus behind the DRC outbreak is more virulent than the one circulating globally, with a case fatality rate (CFR) as high as 10% (compared to less than 0.2% globally). 
Simultaneously, DRC—a country in the throes of a major humanitarian crisis—is battling cholera, measles, anthrax, and plague outbreaks, and hospitals are overwhelmed trying to treat people injured in violent clashes across the country.
 
Where are the vaccines? Millions of doses of mpox vaccine have been rolled out globally over the last two years. Yet DRC—epicenter of the largest, deadliest mpox outbreak to date—has seen no mass vaccination, per Health Policy Watch.
  • Global supply line issues, local regulatory hurdles, stigma associated with mpox, and vaccine hesitancy have contributed to the delays.
What’s being done? WHO officials say they’re in talks with the world’s only two mpox vaccine manufacturers to rush vaccines to DRC—but have no confirmed plans to share yet. And: Neither vaccine is approved for use in children. GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners
Tokyo officials are warning that cases of a rare but deadly bacterial infection, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS)—the “flesh-eating disease”—have more than doubled over last year to 88 cases in the city. Japan Times 

64 measles cases have been reported in the U.S. this year—surpassing the total of 58 cases in all of 2023, according to new data from the CDC. The New York Times 

South Korea's medical professors are joining forces with the nation’s trainee doctors on strike, reducing their hours and participating in protests to improve working conditions for doctors. Reuters 

Medicare will cover Wegovy for U.S. patients at risk of heart disease and strokes—the first time the government-issued policies will cover the GLP-1 agonist weight-loss drugs. NPR HUMAN RIGHTS Shifting Trafficking Trends
Men and boys are increasingly targeted for trafficking in Southeast Asia, where they are forced into working at internet “scam centers” in Myanmar, Cambodia, and the Philippines.

The UN estimates that hundreds of thousands of people are trapped inside such compounds, which operate online scams that generate billions of dollars for criminal syndicates.

Such centers have “completely changed the landscape” of trafficking, said Caitlin Wyndham with the anti-trafficking organization Blue Dragon: 
  • Before the pandemic, more than 90% of the group’s rescue missions were related to sexual exploitation of women and girls. 
  • By 2022, 40% of the people Blue Dragon assisted were men and boys, while the proportion of victims exploited for labor surged 4X. 
The Telegraph  GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES FAMILY PLANNING Misinformation Clouds Contraceptive Use
OB-GYNs say they are changing how they talk with patients about contraceptives as rampant social media misinformation shapes young people’s view of birth control. 

Videos that vilify hormonal birth control have gained heavy traction on TikTok and Instagram—as influencers blame problems like weight gain and infertility on IUDs and pills.
  • Such influencers instead praise “natural” methods—which doctors say could lead to unwanted pregnancies at a time when abortion access is narrowing. 
Especially vulnerable are women of color whose communities faced historical exploitation and neglect from the medical establishment, say advocates. 

The Washington Post (Gift Article)

Related: Male birth control research wins audience over at STAT Madness event – STAT OPPORTUNITY The Invisible Shield, a new four-part documentary series from Radical Media with support from Bloomberg Philanthropies, reveals how the field of public health has saved countless lives, protected people from the constant threat of disease, and increased life spans.
 
The series explores public health’s hidden infrastructure and its policies and systems that make modern life possible. It highlights the thousands of unsung heroes—physicians, nurses, scientists, activists, reformers, engineers, and government officials—who’ve worked together to improve health outcomes, from the days of cholera and smallpox through the most recent battle with COVID-19.
  • Premiere: Tuesday, March 26, 10 p.m. ET 
QUICK HITS DNA test says it can predict opioid addiction risk. Skeptics aren’t so sure – The Washington Post

Closing diagnostic gaps to achieve parity in women’s healthcare – PLOS Global Public Health (commentary) 

New Global TB Dictionary Aims to Standardize Terminology in Tuberculosis Research – ISGlobal

The ultimate green burial? Human composting lets you replenish the earth after death – NPR Shots

Hundreds of photos show animal behaviour during COVID-19 lockdowns – CBC Issue No. 2502
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on X @GHN_News.

Please send the Global Health NOW free sign-up link to friends and colleagues: http://www.globalhealthnow.org/subscribe

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  Copyright 2024 Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All Rights Reserved. Views and opinions expressed in Global Health NOW do not necessarily reflect those of the Bloomberg School.


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Categories: Global Health Feed

Global Health NOW: Water for Peace: What Would It Take?; Learning from Finns’ Happiness; and Days Go By—But Not Bidets

Global Health Now - Fri, 03/22/2024 - 10:03
96 Global Health NOW: Water for Peace: What Would It Take?; Learning from Finns’ Happiness; and Days Go By—But Not Bidets View this email in your browser March 22, 2024 Forward Share Post A Palestinian child waits in line for clean water in Rafah, Gaza, on March 16. Yasser Qudaih/Anadolu via Getty Water for Peace: What Would It Take?  
Water for Peace, the theme of this year’s World Water Day, offers a dose of optimism in a year that has been rife with war. 

Increasingly, water is a key factor in many of these conflicts—from Gaza to Haiti to Ukraine.
  • Consider that 3 billion people worldwide depend on water that crosses national borders—yet only two dozen countries have water-sharing agreements, per the WHO
In some conflicts, tensions over water access turn violent. In other cases, attacks on water resources are used as weapons of war. As president of the Pacific Institute, water expert and author of The Three Ages of Water Peter Gleick has worked to improve documentation of some of these atrocities and press for solutions. 

In an exclusive Q&A, he describes challenges surrounding water poverty, access issues, and inadequately enforced water laws—and weighs in on where the public health community can help. He lands on the core message that all water problems are solvable if we embrace and scale up innovation.
 
The Quote: “We know how to provide safe water and sanitation to everyone. It’s not a technological problem; it’s not an economic problem. It’s an institutional problem. There needs to be a greater effort on the part of the medical community, communities in general, the corporate sector, and governments to meet the need.”
 
Dayna Kerecman Myers, Global Health NOW
  READ THE FULL Q&A GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners   The first pig liver transplanted into a person lasted for 10 days, in a “milestone” procedure in which Chinese surgeons stitched the organ from a genetically engineered miniature pig to the blood vessels of a 50-year-old clinically dead man. Nature

Nairobi physicians are on strike, shutting down critical services at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital as the Kenya Medical Practitioners, Pharmacists and Dentists Union demands better government remuneration. The Star

Fatal U.S. drug overdoses have reached a new high, as ~108,000 Americans died of overdoses in 2022, new CDC data show; that’s a 1% increase over 2021 and the continuation of “the worst overdose epidemic in American history.” AP

Graphic warning labels on cigarette packaging and ads are “factual and uncontroversial”—and constitutional—a U.S. federal appeals court ruled yesterday; FDA says the visual warnings are needed to reduce smoking, which still kills 480,000+ Americans per year. Reuters PHARMACEUTICALS Fighting for Chance to Fight Cystic Fibrosis
South Africans struggling to access a “miracle” cystic fibrosis drug are now launching a legal battle in hopes of breaking down cost barriers. 

The drug, Trikafta, released in 2019 by the Boston-based pharmaceutical company Vertex, offers “transformative” infection-preventing benefits for people with cystic fibrosis, giving them a normal life expectancy.
  • But its exorbitant cost—$326,000 a year—keeps it out of reach for many health systems and individuals across the world. 
A lawsuit has now been filed against Vertex by a South African patient accusing the company of “patent abuse and of violating patients’ human rights under the country’s constitution.”
  • “People need access to this medication. Every single day that goes by without the medication, their lungs deteriorate further, and some of it is permanent damage,” said lawsuit plaintiff Cheri Nel. 
The Guardian

Related: The Mothers Who Aren’t Waiting to Give Their Children Cystic-Fibrosis Drugs – The Atlantic GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES HAPPINESS Learning from the Finns
For the seventh consecutive year, Finland has been ranked as the world's happiest country in the annual World Happiness Report—a testament to its robust safety net and strong social fabric, reports DW.
  • The survey asks people in 143 countries and territories to evaluate their life on a scale from zero to 10, and includes factors like GDP, social support, and healthy life expectancy. 
Finland’s positives: Finnish people benefit from a close connection to nature, a healthy work-life balance, and free health care and education, researchers say. 

But in the U.S., adolescents and young adults are reporting a “dramatic decrease” in well-being and happiness, reports NPR. Researchers point to the negative impacts of social media, political polarization, climate change, and economic inequality as driving factors. 

Related: Can a picture make you happy? We asked photographers and here's what they sent us – NPR Goats and Soda FRIDAY DIVERSION Days Go By—But Not Bidets
As 2020 panic purchases gather dust, one trend has not circled the drain: bidets.

Taking the plunge: The Great Toilet Paper shortage of 2020 inspired many bidet-curious to try out the tush-cleaning device—and they never went back.
  • “We had millions of people who were peering over the edge and they all jumped,” said Miki Agrawal, founder of bidet startup Tushy, which saw 5X revenue growth during 2020 and 20% year-over-year increases since. 
On (or off) a roll: Just 6% of U.S. adults already have a bidet in their home, but an additional 41% are interested, found a YouGov poll. Americans still lead the world in per capita toilet paper usage, and their bidet usage pales in comparison with other countries.
  • Industry analysts say the next wave of bidet models will be geared toward aging populations and people with mobility issues. 
Flushed with pride: “A bidet user—they can’t stop talking about it with their friends,” said James Lin, founder of BidetKing.com. “We’ve got you for life.”

The Washington Post (gift link) QUICK HITS In Pricey Silicon Valley, a Plan to Preempt Homelessness – Bloomberg CityLab

Texas libraries work to bridge state’s mental health services gap – The Texas Tribune

Four Children Have Achieved HIV Remission: Deborah Persaud, M.D., Explains How This Breakthrough Will Save Children’s Lives – Elisabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation

Survey suggests Trump’s attacks boosted public trust in science – Science

Four years on: the career costs for scientists battling long COVID – Nature

The Unbearable Vagueness of Medical ‘Professionalism’ – The New York Times (gift link) Thanks for the tip, Dave Cundiff! Issue No. 2501
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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Global Health NOW: An Urgent Plea as Cholera Surges; A Particle Problem; and PEPFAR Gets a Reprieve

Global Health Now - Thu, 03/21/2024 - 09:20
96 Global Health NOW: An Urgent Plea as Cholera Surges; A Particle Problem; and PEPFAR Gets a Reprieve As 15 countries face active cholera outbreaks, “zero doses” left in global vaccine stockpile. View this email in your browser March 21, 2024 Forward Share Post A young child holds up a vaccination card as Yemenis receive oral cholera vaccinations on September 19, 2019, in Sana'a, Yemen. Mohammed Hamoud/Getty An Urgent Plea as Cholera Surges
The global group that manages the cholera vaccine stockpile made an urgent plea yesterday for “immediate action” against the disease’s growing threat, per a WHO news release.

The multi-year surge: Preliminary data show there were 700,000+ cholera cases last year, up from 473,000 in 2022, which was more than double 2021’s case count.

What needs to happen: The International Coordinating Group called for investments to improve access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene; testing and surveillance; better access to quality health care; and “fast-tracking additional production of affordable oral cholera vaccine doses to better prevent cases.”

No vaccines: Even as 15 countries are facing active outbreaks, there are “zero doses left” in the global cholera vaccine stockpile, write WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and Zambian president Hakainde Hichilema in a Guardian op-ed published this morning.
  • Most pharmaceutical companies aren’t interested in producing cholera vaccines because of their “low profitability,” Tedros and Hichilema argue.
The Quote: “Poverty, conflict and climate catastrophes reflect mismanagement of resources, poor governance and failed leadership,” they write. “Cholera is a mirror to the ills of the world, and humanity seems to be on a quest to amplify it.” EDITORS' NOTE Happy 2,500th!  
This year, we’re celebrating 10 years of GHN, and today we celebrate 2,500 issues.
 
That milestone means we’ve published some 10,000 summaries of essential global health news since January 2, 2014.
 
None of this would be possible without the dedication and persistent hard work of Team GHN: Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, Jackie Powder—and our two newest writers Aliza Rosen and Rin Swann. Huge thanks to you!
 
My gratitude is reflected in a note I received Tuesday from a loyal reader: “… My day starts with reading GHN articles with a cup of tea in my hand, setting the tone for my day with insightful information and thought-provoking content. Thank you and your team once again.”
 
I couldn’t have said it better. —Brian
 
PS: Have thoughts to share?  Send me a note. GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners
Yellow fever is spreading in 13 African nations, the WHO has warned in an outbreak notice, urging countries to ramp up surveillance to avoid further spread through travel. CIDRAP
 
U.S. life expectancy has rebounded somewhat since the height of the pandemic, from 76.4 years in 2021—the lowest since 1996—to 77.5 in 2022, according to CDC data released today. Politico
 
Pakistan recorded its first polio case of 2024—a child who has been paralyzed by the disease—nixing hopes that the country might have no new cases this year; the country has responded with a vaccination campaign in the affected area. The Telegraph

Human sweat contains a protein that can protect against Lyme disease, according to new research from MIT and the University of Helsinki; the authors hope to use the protein to create skin creams to help prevent and treat the disease. MIT News POLLUTION A Particle Problem 
Less than 10% of countries met the WHO standards for particulate matter pollution in 2023, according to a report by the Swiss company IQAir.

The study focused on the deadliest form of pollution: small, solid particles under 2.5 micrometers that can enter the bloodstream. PM2.5 leads to millions of premature deaths annually, per the New York Times. 

Danger zones: 
  • Bangladesh, Pakistan, India, and Tajikistan were ranked most polluted.
  • Beijing's PM2.5 pollution increased 14% from last year.
  • The 13 most polluted cities in North America were in Canada—a result of the 2023 wildfires.

Complex culprits: Fossil fuels, wildfire smoke, vehicle traffic, and coal and industrial emissions remain major causes of pollution. 

Related: Every new school being built in England is in unsafe air pollution area, study says – The Guardian GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES HIV/AIDS PEPFAR Gets a Reprieve
After being mired in political infighting for months, the global AIDS program PEPFAR was renewed for one year in a U.S. congressional spending package. 

The background: PEPFAR—credited with saving 25 million lives since its 2003 inception—has traditionally received broad bipartisan support. 
  • That was until last year, when conservative lawmakers argued that it was being used to promote pro-abortion policies, and stymied funding. 
The one-year reauthorization, which comes after months of negotiations, gives a concession to those lawmakers: funding is typically approved in five-year installments. 

But: It does keep U.S. support alive, and protects PEPFAR from election-year politics, advocates say. 

Axios OPPORTUNITY QUICK HITS Climate change unleashing torrent of infectious disease threats, physicians caution – CIDRAP

Indian Pharma Companies Under Investigation For Poor Drug Quality Donate Millions to Political Parties – Health Policy Watch

Overdose deaths hit another record but show signs of leveling off – STAT

Swedish pharmacy bans sale of anti-ageing skincare to children – The Guardian

More Studies by Columbia Cancer Researchers Are Retracted – New York Times

NHS AI test spots tiny cancers missed by doctors – BBC

What is the breast cancer risk calculator recommended by Olivia Munn? – AP Issue No. 2500
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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Global Health NOW: The TB Fight Gets a Boost; 5 Reasons to Help Save Forests; and Whooping Cough's Rise in the Czech Republic

Global Health Now - Wed, 03/20/2024 - 09:34
96 Global Health NOW: The TB Fight Gets a Boost; 5 Reasons to Help Save Forests; and Whooping Cough's Rise in the Czech Republic View this email in your browser March 20, 2024 Forward Share Post Patients rest in a garden in Sizwe Tropical Diseases Hospital's Ward 16, where drug-resistant TB patients are treated. Johannesburg, South Africa, August 5, 2019. Michele Spatari/AFP via Getty ‘Reinvigorating’ the Fight Against TB
A highly anticipated tuberculosis vaccine is entering the final phase of clinical trials—a “significant step” in the effort to bring the world its first new TB vaccine in over a century, reports CIDRAP

The M72/AS01E tuberculosis vaccine aims to prevent pulmonary TB—the most common form of the disease—in adolescents and adults.
  • If efficacious, the shot could “reinvigorate" the battle against the disease, said the vaccine’s lead developer Alemnew Dagnew. 
Promising signs: Phase 2 trials found the GSK-developed vaccine provided approximately 50% protection against active pulmonary TB for three years in people infected with the tuberculosis bacterium, reports Politico

The phase 3 trial will include ~20,000 participants in seven countries and last about five years.
  • The first doses are being given in South Africa, announced the Bill & Melinda Gates Medical Research Institute, which is sponsoring trials. 
The stakes: TB killed 1.3 million people in 2022.

Meanwhile: The WHO is calling for greater investment in TB screening and preventive treatment, outlining the potential impact through a modeling study. GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners   University of Amsterdam researchers say they successfully eliminated HIV from infected cells using “molecular scissors” based on CRISPR gene-editing technology; they emphasize that their work, presented at a medical conference this week, is merely “proof of concept” and not expected to become an HIV cure any time soon. BBC

Severe winter in Mongolia is deepening a livestock mortality crisis in the country, leading to the death of 4.7 million livestock and putting the livelihoods of 75% of all herder households under “severe threat” as 7,000 families lack adequate food. ReliefWeb

Seven Indian pharmaceutical companies donated to political parties while under investigation for substandard production of drugs including the anti-COVID remdesivir, antibacterials, and antifungals, per an investigation published in Scroll; with national elections just a month away, India’s Supreme Court has pressed for “complete disclosure” of the donor data. Health Policy Watch

Nonorganic strawberries, grapes, and leafy greens such as spinach and kale topped the annual U.S. “Dirty Dozen” list for detectable pesticide levels, while avocados, sweet corn, pineapples, onions, and papayas head up the counterpart “Clean Fifteen” list of least-contaminated conventionally grown produce. CNN GHN EXCLUSIVE COMMENTARY Forests serve as a supermarket, pharmacy, hardware store, and utility company for millions of people worldwide. kazuend/unsplash.com 5 Reasons Why the Global Health Community Should Help Save Forests  
More than a billion people in LMICs live within a kilometer of a forest, according to the UNFA.
  • For many of them, forests function as a local supermarket, pharmacy, hardware store, and utility company, writes food security and global health specialist Anila Jacob.
  • Forests provide wild foods, clean water, building materials, fuel wood, and natural medicines. 
But Iceland-sized tracts of forest have disappeared every year since the UN General Assembly proclaimed March 21, 2012, the first International Day of Forests.

Benefits: Investing in forest conservation can be a highly cost-effective benefit to human health, especially for some of the world’s most vulnerable populations.

Here’s why the global health community should champion forest conservation:
  • Forests feed people. Children living within 3 kilometers of forests had 25% higher dietary diversity compared with those who lived farther away, per a 2018 Science Advances article
  • Forests supply clean water. Denser tree cover in upstream watersheds was associated with a lower probability of diarrheal disease among children in downstream communities, per a 2017 study in Nature Communications.
Read the full commentary for more reasons and a promising approach to get started saving forests.

Anila Jacob for Global Health NOW READ THE FULL STORY INFECTIOUS DISEASES Record Rise of Whooping Cough
Czech Republic health officials have documented 3,000+ cases of whooping cough this year—the country’s highest number since 1968. 

Cases have surged since early January, despite mandatory whooping cough vaccination of children. 

Vaccination Gaps:
  • 97% of infants in the Czech Republic receive their first whooping cough vaccinations.

  • But only 90% receive the final two.
Garbled guidance: The head of the national public health authority shot down the Prague health authority’s direction that schools send home unvaccinated children in a class with a confirmed case. Instead, the national public health leader said whooping cough cases in classrooms should be judged individually.

Wider spread: Other European countries, including England and the Netherlands, are also facing rising numbers. 

The BBC GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH RIGHTS Abortions Rose, Despite Roe’s Fall
More than a million abortions were provided in the U.S. in 2023—the highest number in over a decade, per a Guttmacher Institute report published Tuesday.
  • Medication abortions rose to 63% of all abortions in 2023, up from 53% in 2020, NPR reports.

  • The rise in both numbers comes as 14 states have banned abortion. 
States bordering those with the most restrictive anti-abortion laws saw some of the largest increases, The Washington Post notes
  • New Mexico, which borders Texas, recorded 257% more procedures.

  • States without total bans recorded a 25% increase last year relative to 2020.
The report’s authors speculate that these numbers could be an undercount, as they don’t account for abortions outside of the formal health care system—and the increased availability of medication abortion via telemedicine likely contributed to the overall rise.

Related: 

Standard pregnancy care is now dangerously disrupted in Louisiana, report reveals – NPR Shots

Contraceptives will be available without a prescription in New York following a statewide order – PBS NewsHour

States push ‘fetal personhood’ bills despite outrage at Alabama IVF ruling – The Guardian CORRECTION A Headline Miss  
Two GHN readers wrote to us to take exception to our Monday headline for a summary about the rates of more than a dozen cancers increasing among adults under the age of 50. “Why Are Cancer Patients Getting Younger?” wasn’t meant to convey that cancer is causing patients to get younger. 
 
Thanks go to Dr. Pandiyan Natarajan and another loyal reader for pointing out the headline issue. —Brian QUICK HITS 'Critical' to catch up on measles vaccinations to stem outbreaks, says WHO – Reuters

Officials describe dealing with outbreaks of mpox, hepatitis A, and meningococcal disease at the same time – CIDRAP

New Zealand will ban disposable e-cigarettes in a bid to prevent minors from taking up the habit – AP

Guns and weapons trafficked from US fueling Haiti gang violence – The Guardian Thanks for the tip, Cecilia Meisner! 

AI image generators often give racist and sexist results: can they be fixed? – Nature

A study says intermittent fasting is making people drop dead. Oh, come on – STAT (commentary) Issue No. 2499
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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Global Health NOW: Famine Looms in Gaza; Pandemic Pact Nears Finish Line; and Hard Lines Over CDC Guidelines

Global Health Now - Tue, 03/19/2024 - 09:24
96 Global Health NOW: Famine Looms in Gaza; Pandemic Pact Nears Finish Line; and Hard Lines Over CDC Guidelines View this email in your browser March 19, 2024 Forward Share Post Palestinians hold out containers to be filled with food distributed by charity organizations in Rafah, Gaza on February 25. Abed Zagout/Anadolu via Getty Famine Looms in Gaza
Northern Gaza is on the brink of famine, as much of the population moves from “acute food insecurity” into “catastrophic levels of hunger,” UN News reports
  • Famine may happen by the end of May, barring the immediate cessation of hostilities and delivery of food and supplies, per a UN Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) report published yesterday.

  • 1.1 million people—half of the Gaza Strip’s population—will endure catastrophic conditions between now and mid-July, assuming the conflict escalates and Israeli forces launch a ground offensive in Rafah.

  • People in nearly two-thirds of northern Gaza households didn’t eat for entire days and nights at least 10 times in the previous 30 days.
Crisis: “People in Gaza are starving to death right now. The speed at which this man-made hunger and malnutrition crisis has ripped through Gaza is terrifying,” Cindy McCain, World Food Programme executive director, told The Telegraph.
 
Urgent need: “There is a very small window left to prevent an outright famine and to do that we need immediate and full access to the north,” McCain said. “If we wait until famine has been declared, it’s too late. Thousands more will be dead.” GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners   Legislators in The Gambia referred a repeal of the country’s 2015 ban on female genital mutilation to a national committee for further debate; enforcement has been weak since the ban’s passage, with just two cases prosecuted. AP

The EPA finalized a rule to ban chrysotile asbestos (the only form of asbestos currently in use in the U.S.); the substance, linked to multiple types of cancer, has been banned in 50 other countries. CNN

NIH researchers turned up no physical evidence of brain injury in “Havana syndrome” cases, per a study published in JAMA yesterday; a companion commentary, however, cautioned against dismissing earlier findings that supported a connection. Reuters

Nearly 130,000 children in Chicago are exposed to lead in their drinking water; in a JAMA Pediatrics study published yesterday, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health researchers determined that the 19% of kids using unfiltered tap water have about 2X as much lead in their blood as they would otherwise—and that Black and Latino residents are more likely to have contaminated water via lead pipes. The Guardian GLOBAL HEALTH SECURITY Pandemic Pact Nears Finish Line
Negotiations on the draft for the international “pandemic treaty” entered a final round yesterday—setting the stage for a vote on the pact at the World Health Assembly in May, reports Science.

Background: The treaty, which has been in the works since December 2021, has been drafted to “strengthen pandemic prevention, preparedness and response”—with an emphasis on equity after the staggered international COVID-19 response, reports Axios

What’s covered (among other points): 
  • Pathogen surveillance.

  • Antimicrobial resistance management.

  • Health care system and capacity improvements.
Sticking points: Currently, the pact calls for nations to share pathogen information—with the expectation that they will benefit from related research in the form of access to drugs and vaccines.
  • But pharmaceutical companies say that could violate intellectual property rights.
The bottom line: “Compromises in the final text must uphold principles on equity. Otherwise, we may continue to sow seeds of plagues and count the dead when the next pandemic hits,” said Nelson Aghogho Evaborhene, a vaccine specialist at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES INFECTIOUS DISEASES Hard Lines Over CDC Guidelines 
As the CDC revisits its “foundational” set of guidelines for preventing infectious disease spread at health facilities, critics say the agency is at risk of downplaying airborne threats, reports Amy Maxmen. 

Repeating past mistakes? The guidelines, which are being revisited after nearly two decades, have already prompted outcry in earlier drafts over a more lax response to airborne transmission—with critics saying it sets up the potential for another COVID-19 scenario. 

And opponents contend that if the final guidelines don’t spell out the need for masks and air filtration, hospitals won’t invest in such tools. 

The Quote: “The people in charge of these decisions should be the ones forced to take those risks,” said New York city emergency physician Sonya Stokes. 

NBC REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH RIGHTS Abortion Barriers Persist in Thailand
The unearthing of 2,000+ decomposing fetuses awaiting cremation in a Bangkok temple—part of an underground abortion network—in 2010 forced Thailand to rethink the laws driving women to risk death for unsafe abortions. But it wasn’t until 2020 that the procedure was decriminalized.
 
Today, hospitals in just 39 of Thailand’s 77 provinces are officially registered as abortion providers; none of Bangkok’s 22 public hospitals provide subsidized abortions.
  • Only women able to travel to hospitals providing subsidized procedures, or with the money for private care, can access services.
Stigma is another barrier: Many from the nation’s conservative Theravada Buddhist majority believe abortion contradicts teachings. The nation’s abortion laws do not require doctors who object to abortion to carry out the procedure.

The Telegraph QUICK HITS Supreme Court questions restricting government efforts to limit Covid-19 misinformation – STAT

CDC measles alert urges MMR vaccine for youngest international travelers – CIDRAP

Mexico Is Flooded With American Guns. Could a $10 Billion Lawsuit Change Things? – Slate 

Many hospitals in China stop newborn delivery services as birth rate drops – Reuters

DNA tests are uncovering the true prevalence of incest – The Atlantic

‘It feels like a mountain you never get done climbing’: Covid isn’t over for disabled and older adults – The 19th 

Towards authentic institutional allyship by global health funders – PLOS Global Public Health (commentary) Issue No. 2498
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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Global Health NOW: Haiti’s Health Care Collapse; Why Are Cancer Patients Getting Younger?; and Prioritizing Pedestrians

Global Health Now - Mon, 03/18/2024 - 09:36
96 Global Health NOW: Haiti’s Health Care Collapse; Why Are Cancer Patients Getting Younger?; and Prioritizing Pedestrians View this email in your browser March 18, 2024 Forward Share Post Haiti’s Health Care Collapse
Desperation is mounting for patients in Haiti, as gang warfare paralyzes the nation’s hospitals and health workers flee the violence, reports The Guardian

Last legs: In the last two weeks, hospitals have been ransacked and set on fire. Others are shutting their doors, unable to access medical supplies or power.
  • A single public hospital in Haiti’s capital now remains operational—and is expected to close soon. 
Health workers targeted: Doctors and nurses are being increasingly attacked and kidnapped, reports NPR Goats and Soda. Many now stay home, while others have fled the country in what one doctor mourned as an “exodus of the best and brightest.” 

Dwindling supplies: Blockades and raids have left hospitals and clinics without basic medical supplies, leaving patients in medical limbo, reports CNN.
  • 260 shipping containers of humanitarian supplies in Port-Au-Prince’s main port are now under gang control. 
Bigger picture: 360,000 Haitians have now been internally displaced. 

The Quote: “We are witnessing a humanitarian catastrophe, and there is little time left to reverse it,”  said UNICEF representative Bruno Maes. GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners   Iran’s Medical Council warned of rising emigration of pediatric heart surgeons in a report Friday, leaving hundreds of sick children without care. Iran International Newsroom
 
Higher levels of social vulnerability
—including socioeconomic and racial minority status—may increase the likelihood of having drug-resistant pneumococcal infections, per a new Clinical Infectious Diseases study. CIDRAP 

The FDA approved the first U.S. drug—resmetirom—to treat metabolic dysfunction-associated steatohepatitis (MASH)—an obesity-linked liver disease that affects 5% of the world’s adults. Nature

Brazil will expand the release of Wolbachia bacteria-infected mosquitoes to combat dengue fever to six more cities, following the apparent success of a pilot initiative in five cities—including Niterói, where the method was credited with a 69% decrease in dengue. The Guardian NONCOMMUNICABLE DISEASES Why Are Cancer Patients Getting Younger? 
The rates of more than a dozen cancers are increasing among adults under the age of 50.
  • Current models predict that early-onset cancer cases will increase by ~30% between 2019 and 2030. 
Scientists are rushing to understand why. Contributors like rising obesity and early-cancer screening do not fully account for the increase, say researchers who are seeking clues in multiple directions, including:
  • Gut microbiome composition. 

  • The genomes of tumors. 

  • Potential exposures to hormones or stressors while in utero. 
The Quote: “If it had been a single smoking gun, our studies would have at least pointed to one factor,” says gastroenterologist Sonia Kupfer. “But it doesn’t seem to be that — it seems to be a combination of many different factors.”

Nature GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES ROAD SAFETY Prioritizing Pedestrians in NYC
Last year was the safest year for pedestrians in New York City since record-keeping began 114 years ago (barring pandemic shutdowns in 2020). What changed? City officials point to more rigorous adoption of Vision Zero—the policy goal of zero traffic fatalities.
  • New York City was the first U.S. city to implement Vision Zero in 2014. The city reduced its speed limit to 25 miles per hour, set up speed cameras, and invested in education campaigns. 

  • The city has also completed hundreds of intersection redesigns: extending red light lengths for pedestrians; creating raised crosswalks; and “daylighting”— a safety measure that removes parked cars near crosswalks. 
But: 30 cyclists were killed on city streets in 2023, a 23-year high. OPPORTUNITY Coursera: New Data-Use Course
The Center for Global Digital Health Innovation has launched a new Coursera course on population health data use, created with its Data for Health partners at Bloomberg Philanthropies.
  • The course covers the data generation lifecycle, how data can inform health policy, and more. 

  • Modules feature 18 instructors from around the world, including faculty from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and experts from the WHO, CDC Foundation, and Vital Strategies.

  • Enroll in the Coursera Course
QUICK HITS Vaccines cut risk of post-COVID heart failure, blood clots for at least 6 months, data suggest – CIDRAP

First Person: Southern Madagascar, where girls are sold into marriage before they are born – UN News

More Chinese tied the knot in 2023, lifting marriage rates for first time in nine years – Reuters

Cigarette smoking behaviors and nicotine dependence at the intersection of sexual identity and sex in the United States: Findings from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health – Preventive Medicine Reports

More than 4,000 plastic chemicals are hazardous, report finds – Nature

Biden to sign executive order aimed at advancing study of women’s health – AP

Doing Well by Doing Good: Why Investing in Global Health R&D Benefits the United States and the World – GHTC (news release)

The harms of adverse childhood experiences are well-known. But positive experiences can affect future health, too – STAT

Q&A: Author of 'Bottled: How Coca-Cola Became African' on Coke's surprising history – NPR Goats and Soda Issue No. 2497
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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WHO study shows $39 return for each dollar invested in fight against TB

World Health Organization - Mon, 03/18/2024 - 08:00
The UN World Health Organization (WHO) on Monday called for a funding boost in tuberculosis (TB) screening and prevention programmes to protect vulnerable populations and achieve key health goals.
Categories: Global Health Feed

Explainer: What is famine?

World Health Organization - Mon, 03/18/2024 - 08:00
Amid growing global concerns over alarming hunger spikes in conflict-affected communities and talk of intensifying levels of food insecurity possibly leading to famine, we looked into how – and when – a famine is classified.
Categories: Global Health Feed

Global Health NOW: A Possible Game-Changer Against Ebola Sudan Infections; Newborn Crisis in the Western Cape; and Outfoxing a Fox

Global Health Now - Fri, 03/15/2024 - 09:39
96 Global Health NOW: A Possible Game-Changer Against Ebola Sudan Infections; Newborn Crisis in the Western Cape; and Outfoxing a Fox View this email in your browser March 15, 2024 Forward Share Post Jane Apunyo, head nurse of the Mubende referral hospital, during night supervision at the Ebola treatment center in Mubende, Uganda, on October 27, 2022. Badru Katumba/AFP via Getty A Possible Game-Changer Against Ebola Sudan Infections  
The antiviral drug obeldesivir showed promise in curbing Ebola Sudan infections—which currently have no approved vaccines or treatments—in a small study of primates published yesterday in Science.

How they did it: Five monkeys given obeldesivir, an oral pill, 24 hours after being injected with what should have been a lethal injection of Sudan ebolavirus all survived, STAT reports; two control monkeys that got a placebo died.
 
Why it’s exciting: An oral pill would be a huge advantage in the remote, resource-poor areas where filoviruses usually strike, per Science.
  • Unlike monoclonal antibodies—the only approved treatments, for the Ebola Zaire species of the virus—obeldesivir is easy to administer, can be stored at room temperature, and is relatively inexpensive, STAT notes.
And: In in vitro studies, obeldesivir shows promise against all known species of Ebola and the related virus, Marburg, though that will require testing in animal and human models to confirm.
 
The Quote: “I think you could really, really control these outbreaks quicker if you have something like this … I think it can definitely be a game-changer,” said the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston’s Tom Geisbert, a senior author of the study.
 
STAT GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners
Typhoid fever’s high incidence in sub-Saharan Africa and the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant typhoid strains underscore the need for typhoid conjugate vaccines, according to a hospital-based surveillance study in The Lancet Global Health. CIDRAP

A range of neurological conditions—from strokes and dementia to migraines—are now the leading cause of ill health worldwide, affecting 3.4 billion people and causing 11.1 million deaths in 2021, finds a new study in The Lancet Neurology. The Guardian

The toll of tuberculosis among adolescents and young adults—as measured in incidence, mortality, and disability-adjusted life years—decreased from 1990 to 2019; but the incidence of drug-resistant TB increased. Pediatrics 

Finland has confirmed a record 92 hepatitis E cases so far this year (compared to 33 cases for all of 2023), and 42 people have been hospitalized in the outbreak linked to a batch of mettwurst, a cold cut similar to salami. Yle SUBSTANCE USE Newborn Crisis
In the Western Cape of South Africa, extensive alcohol use during pregnancy has led to the highest rate of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in the world. 

The numbers: 
  • FASD rates are as high as 31% in the Western Cape. (The global average is 0.7%.)
Symptoms include learning disabilities and behavioral issues. In more severe cases, FASD can cause organ damage, facial deformities, vision and hearing problems, and reduced lifespan.
  • People with FASD are 19X more likely to end up in jail.
Why are the rates so high? Contributors include binge drinking, easy access to alcohol, and unplanned pregnancies in the Western Cape. 

The Telegraph DAILY DIVERSION Outfoxing a Fox
To care for an orphan red fox kit, a wildlife rehabilitation center in Richmond, Virginia, has adopted some sly moves. 

In a now-viral video posted to the Richmond Wildlife Center’s Facebook page, executive director Melissa Stanley wears a red fox mask as she feeds a tiny fox kit from a syringe. 

Vulpine veneer: The disguise is one measure staff use to keep the fox from associating care with humans so she can be reintroduced into the wild, Stanley told USA Today.
  • The tactic is common in caring for birds of prey—and recalls other viral footage of workers in China wearing panda suits to tend cubs.
Fantastic Little Fox: The kit was found in an alley by a man walking his dog, reports the AP. Less than 24 hours old, she weighed 80 grams, and her umbilical stump was still attached. She is believed to be the “sole survivor” of a family of foxes trapped and removed from a nearby den site. 

A different kind of fox hunt: The center found another group of fox kits at a facility in northern Virginia—where the orphan will soon be transferred and hopefully integrated. 

“It's really important that we get them together as soon as possible so that she knows that she's a fox,” Stanley said. OPPORTUNITY QUICK HITS Reductions in new HIV infections in several Global HIV Prevention Coalition countries, but global progress needs to be accelerated – UNAIDS (news release)

A spotlight on the stark imbalances of global health research – Nature

New research sets trap for potentially deadly sandfly – University of Nottingham via ScienceDaily

Reforming oral health policy to contain noma – Punch

Budget constraints limit foreign affairs funding in Biden proposal – Devex

What to know about another dangerous amoeba linked to neti pots and nasal rinsing – PBS NewsHour

Wake up: Sleeplessness is a public health crisis – Bhekisisa

Dutch supermarket decides to stop meat promotions – The Brussels Times Issue No. 2496
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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Global Health NOW: A ‘Darker Future’ for Human Development?; Phones’ Gigantic Toll on Gen Z; and Interrupting Parental Poverty

Global Health Now - Thu, 03/14/2024 - 09:10
96 Global Health NOW: A ‘Darker Future’ for Human Development?; Phones’ Gigantic Toll on Gen Z; and Interrupting Parental Poverty View this email in your browser March 14, 2024 Forward Share Post A woman buys fruit ahead of Ramadan, at the Lagos Island market in Lagos, Nigeria, on March 8. Benson Ibeabuchi/AFP via Getty A ‘Darker Future’ for Human Development? 
Only half of the world’s least developed countries have recovered from a host of pandemic-related economic shocks, according to a new UN report on key health and human development indicators.
 
Why is this a serious issue? While affluent countries have bounced back to pre-pandemic levels in the Human Development Index, dozens of poor countries haven’t, and they risk falling off a trajectory of improvement sustained for two decades, The Washington Post reports (gift link).
  • “The gap between the richest and the poorest in our world has widened,” principal author Pedro Conceição told the Post. “We face the risk of having permanent losses in human development unless we change course.”
What’s behind the problem? Report authors blame “mismanaged” globalization and militarization.
  • Vaccine inequality during the pandemic is a prime example of globalization gone awry, UNDP administrator Achim Steiner told The Guardian. The rapidly expanding pandemic quickly had “a social and economic set of ripple effects,” leading to a loss of confidence in governments and radicalized politics.

  • While defense budgets grow, development budgets are being cut, Steiner said. “This is a recipe for a much darker future,” he said.
GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners   ​A blood test for colon cancer performed well—catching 83% of the cancers, although very few of the precancerous growths found by “gold standard” colonoscopies—per results published in The New England Journal of Medicine yesterday; researchers say easier testing options could increase the number of people screened. AP
 
The Supreme Court of India has temporarily banned Patanjali—a billion-dollar ayurvedic company—from advertising some of its traditional ayurvedic products, in a case brought by the Indian Medical Association; a judge in the case said the company has taken the public “for a ride.” NPR Goats and Soda
 
Although air quality in Europe showed significant improvement since 2003, per a 35-nation study in Nature led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), more than 98% of Europeans live in areas exceeding WHO-recommended annual levels for pollutants associated with premature mortality. Health Policy Watch
 
The likelihood of in-hospital deaths rose significantly for six time-sensitive, non-COVID conditions—heart attack, hip fracture, gastrointestinal bleeding, pneumonia, sepsis, and stroke—during COVID-19-related disruptions to health care, according to a JAMA Network Open study published yesterday. CIDRAP MENTAL HEALTH Phones’ Gigantic Toll on Gen Z 
More than a decade since the dual-emergence of smartphones and social media, studies continue to unpack the effects of a “phone-based childhood,” as social psychologist Jonathan Haidt terms it in his new essay. 

Taking an exhaustive view of the research, Haidt concludes that this screen-filled adolescence “is making young people sick and blocking their progress to flourishing in adulthood.” 

Data points: 
  • Rates of teen depression and anxiety in the U.S. rose by more than 50% in many studies from 2010 to 2019. 

  • The suicide rate among adolescents rose 48%. 

  • Loneliness among American teens began to surge around 2012.

  • Adolescents’ sleeping and exercising declined in the early 2010s.

  • Members of Gen Z are dating less, having less sex, and showing less interest in having children than prior generations. 
The Atlantic GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH Interrupting Parental Poverty  
Cash aid will be soon distributed to every new mother in Flint, Michigan—with the hope of improving early childhood outcomes. 

Why: Flint has one of the highest rates of child poverty in the U.S.—at more than 50%. 
  • Research has found that stress related to childhood poverty can harm brain development and mental health. 

  • “What happens in that first year of life can really portend your entire life course trajectory,” said pediatrician Mona Hanna-Attisha. 
The details: The cash transfer program, Rx Kids, will begin payouts during pregnancy to encourage prenatal care; $7,500 in cash aid will be distributed over the course a year.

NPR OPPORTUNITY QUICK HITS Mpox continues to spread in Africa and threatens global health security – Nature Medicine

The tropical disease that’s suddenly everywhere – Vox

Lack of iodin and folic acid in table salt in Israel leads to birth defects, study shows – The Jerusalem Post 

New York trusted this company to care for the sick and elderly. Instead, it left people confused and alone – ProPublica

Reduce the Use of Incubators to Address Infant Mortality – Undark (commentary)

The U.S. Syphilis Spike Has Been Brewing for Decades – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Dangers of Polio explained as Paul Alexander, 78, dies after 70 years in 'iron lung' – Wales Online

Olivia Rodrigo hands out Plan B pills in Missouri, where abortion is banned – NPR Issue No. 2495
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on X @GHN_News.

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Global Health NOW: Early Childhood Deaths Drop—But Not Fast Enough; The Years COVID-19 Cut Short; and HIV Status: Criminal

Global Health Now - Wed, 03/13/2024 - 09:35
96 Global Health NOW: Early Childhood Deaths Drop—But Not Fast Enough; The Years COVID-19 Cut Short; and HIV Status: Criminal View this email in your browser March 13, 2024 Forward Share Post A baby sleeps in her mother's arms after arriving in an IDP settlement. January 10, 2023, Doolow, Somalia. Giles Clarke for The New York Times via Getty Early Childhood Deaths Drop—But Not Fast Enough
The number of children worldwide who died before age 5 dropped to a record low of 4.9 million in 2022, a new UN report finds—but that still represents one death every six seconds, Reuters reports.

Perspective: The mortality rate for young children has fallen more than 50% since 2000—a “historic milestone,” a UN news release stated.
  • But the world is still off-track to meet 2030 goals to reduce preventable child deaths to 25 per 1,000 live births—and progress is at risk of “stagnation or reversal,” warns the report, jointly produced by UNICEF, the WHO, and the World Bank. 
Regions in focus:
  • Deaths were concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. Countries like Chad, Nigeria, and Somalia see 80X more deaths than countries with low rates, reports DW

  • Meanwhile, Cambodia, Malawi, Rwanda, and Mongolia have reduced under-5 mortality rates by more than 75% since 2000.
Factors and causes: Deaths were largely caused by preventable or treatable causes, including preterm birth, respiratory diseases, and diarrhea. GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners   Escalation of fighting in eastern DRC has forced some ~270,000 to flee to South Kivu and Goma since February, exacerbating an already critical health situation and increasing the risk of cholera and other epidemics amid overcrowded, unsanitary living conditions. MSF
 
U.K. children with gender dysphoria will no longer be given puberty-suppressing hormones, NHS England has said, citing a review that found there was “not enough evidence” they are safe or effective. BBC 

High and rising U.S. maternal mortality rates may be overestimates, according to a new study that suggests the addition of the “pregnancy checkbox,” indicating whether a person was pregnant or postpartum at time of death, was behind a spike in those rates in 2018–21. CNN

~11% of U.S. high school seniors have used Delta 8 THC—a quasi-legal psychoactive version of cannabis—per a new survey in JAMA; a legal loophole allows the products to be sold online, at gas stations and smoke shops, and in many states where traditional marijuana is fully illegal—with no federal minimum age to purchase. STAT GLOBAL LIFE EXPECTANCY The Years COVID-19 Cut Short
For the first time in 30 years, global life expectancy has declined—due in large part to the devastating impact of COVID-19, a new study published in The Lancet finds. 

The details: The study found a 1.6-year drop in life expectancy between 2019 and 2021. 

The COVID-19 factor: Researchers found that 15.9 million additional people died who would have survived had COVID-19 not occurred.
  • Excess deaths were not just from the virus itself: Overall mortality rates also increased during this time, likely due to delayed medical care, researchers say. 
Think Global Health GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES INFECTIOUS DISEASES HIV Status: Criminal
With modern treatments, a person living with HIV has a similar life expectancy as someone who is HIV-negative.
 
Yet in the U.S., 34 states still have HIV criminalization laws—punishing a person for exposing someone to the virus, regardless of whether the virus was transmitted, for example—policies that largely arose in the 1980s and ’90s, driven by fear and homophobia.
  • In Tennessee, Louisiana, Ohio, and South Dakota, those convicted of an HIV crime may not only face prison time—but also must join a sex offender registry.
Critics say these laws have become another tool to criminalize Black people, LGBTQ+ people, and sex workers—groups that already face discrimination.
 
The 19th

Related: He’s in an Ohio Prison for Exposing Someone to HIV - Even Though He Couldn’t Transmit the Virus – The Marshall Project

Social workers bridge the gap in HIV care for hospitalized patients in Tanzania – News Medical CHILD MARRIAGE Iraqi Religious Leaders Sidestep Laws  
Human Rights Watch has called for Iraqi leaders to halt the practice of “unregistered marriages” as rates of child marriage increase.
 
Many unregistered marriages are officiated by religious leaders, circumventing Iraq’s laws aimed at preventing child marriage, per HRW’s new report.
  • 28% of girls in Iraq are married before age 18. 

  • 22% of unregistered marriages involve girls under age 14.
Risks to brides: Without official documentation, women and girls are denied access to critical government services, including health care, forcing many to give birth at home and risk dangerous complications. 
 
Human Rights Watch OPPORTUNITY QUICK HITS Visa system forces care workers to stay silent on rape and abuse – The Bureau of Investigative Journalism

Public health emergencies in war and armed conflicts in Africa: What is expected from the global health community? – Africa CDC

Rotten food given to asylum seekers charity finds – BBC

WHO report reveals gender inequalities at the root of global crisis in health and care work – WHO

After Legionnaires’ outbreak, Grand Rapids will consider chlorinating water – Minnesota Public Radio

A new $16,000 postpartum depression drug is here. How will insurers handle it? – KFF Health News

Severe dzud in Mongolia hinders access to health care for thousands – WHO

Call to revive play at UK schools to tackle ‘escalating crisis’ in child health – The Guardian Issue No. 2494
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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Global Health NOW: Entering Year 5 of COVID; The Multi-pronged Threat of ‘Monkey Laundering’; and India Doubles Down on Vaccine Defenses

Global Health Now - Tue, 03/12/2024 - 09:18
96 Global Health NOW: Entering Year 5 of COVID; The Multi-pronged Threat of ‘Monkey Laundering’; and India Doubles Down on Vaccine Defenses The pandemic’s impact continues to evolve—and still captivates scientists bent on cracking COVID’19’s mysteries. View this email in your browser March 12, 2024 Forward Share Post A medical staff member sprays disinfectant at a residential area in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province on March 11, 2020. STR/AFP via Getty Entering Year 5 of COVID 
The four-year anniversary of the WHO declaration of COVID-19 as a pandemic passed yesterday under circumstances once unimaginable in the terrifying spring of 2020: 
  • The crisis is no longer defined by WHO as a global health emergency, vaccines are released seasonally, the CDC no longer tracks cases—and has just relaxed isolation guidance, outlines ABC News
But COVID’s impact continues to evolve—and still captivates scientists bent on cracking some of COVID’19’s mysteries. Some key breakthroughs, per The New York Times (gift article)
  • The nature of spread: Research shows that the virus is becoming better at traveling through the air. 
  • Its strange effects: People who have lost their sense of smell likely experience an immune reaction that changes the genetic activity of their nerves.
  • Its seasonality: COVID has not yet settled into a predictable seasonal pattern like other respiratory viruses—but scientists expect it eventually will. 
Meanwhile, long COVID is becoming better understood as an immune reaction “gone awry”—but resources are still paltry for people who are affected, reports U.S. News

Related: Why Covid Patients Who Could Most Benefit From Paxlovid Still Aren’t Getting It – KFF Health News GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES The Latest One-Liners
People with HIV could benefit from anti-obesity drugs—as researchers have found that semaglutide could reduce certain metabolic conditions and fat accumulation that can be caused by anti-HIV medications. Nature

The U.K. government has barred emigrating health and care workers from entering the country with dependents in an effort to “cut migration and tackle care worker visa abuse,” saying that last year 120,000 dependents accompanied 100,000 workers to the country. Premium Times

Chinese officials have announced new pandemic prevention measures including boosting the number of infectious disease response teams, and pledging to improve outbreak early warning systems and revise laws on infectious disease prevention and control. Straits Times

The CDC updated guidance for investigating and responding to suicide clusters for the first time since 1988; the recommendations factor in new tools for response to suicide clusters, like social media. Healio RESEARCH The Multi-pronged Threat of ‘Monkey Laundering’ 
Long-tailed macaques have a 93% overlap in DNA with humans, which has led to their widespread usage in drug and vaccine testing—and their high monetary value. 

Monkeys used in this testing are supposed to be domestically bred. But increasingly, poachers are capturing wild macaques to sell on the black market, with U.S. pharmaceutical buyers as a frequent endpoint. 

Added dangers: Almost all adult wild macaques host a strain of a herpes B virus called “monkey B” that has killed at least 23 lab employees and 5 monkey workers. While domestic breeding centers have created monkey B-free colonies, the mixing of wild-caught monkeys introduces new fears of an outbreak. 

Bloomberg GLOBAL HEALTH VOICES VACCINES India Doubles Down on Defenses
As countries’ COVID-era resolutions to bolster vaccine-making capacities begin to fade, India has seen staggering growth in that sector. 

Looking to the past and the future: Companies like Serum Institute of India have been rapidly expanding their facilities and manufacturing capacities, with a dual strategy: 
  • Stockpile vaccines that can be rapidly adapted to fight new pathogens.
  • Have facilities primed to manufacture such new shots. 
The goal: Have a vaccine ready within 100 days of a new pathogen’s emergence. 

The Quote: “The more you sweat in peacetime, the less you bleed in wartime,” said Umesh Shaligram, Serum’s head of research and development.

The Telegraph QUICK HITS ‘Damning’ FDA inspection report undermines positive trial results of possible Alzheimer’s drug – Science

Overdose or Poisoning? A New Debate Over What to Call a Drug Death. – New York Times

Oropouche virus cases rise in parts of Brazil, Peru – CIDRAP

The Cystic-Fibrosis Breakthrough That Changed Everything – The Atlantic

People in East Palestine were told their homes were clear of toxins last year. That might not have been the case – CNN

Trump’s vaccine rhetoric sends chills through public health circles – The Hill Thanks for the tip, Cecilia Meisner!

The science of Oppenheimer: meet the Oscar-winning movie’s specialist advisers – Nature Issue No. 2493
Global Health NOW is an initiative of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Contributors include Brian W. Simpson, MPH, Dayna Kerecman Myers, Annalies Winny, Morgan Coulson, Kate Belz, Melissa Hartman, and Jackie Powder. Write us: dkerecm1@jhu.edu, like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram @globalhealth.now and X @GHN_News.

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