climate change

Suzanne King, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University and Douglas Institute

She can talk about the importance of keeping pregnant women away from stress, for themselves and their baby. Professor King is a specialist in prenatal maternal stress. She began the Iowa Flood Study right after major flooding in this US state in June 2008. Her group added disaster questionnaires to an existing study of pregnant women for whom mental health data had been collected prior to the flooding.

Classified as: climate change, Quebec, Flood, McGill Department of Psychiatry, rain
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Published on: 9 May 2017

Ecosystems are a complex web of interactions. These ecological networks are being reorganized by extinctions and colonization events caused by human impacts, such as climate change and habitat destruction. In a paper published this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution, researchers from McGill University and University of British Columbia have developed a new theory to understand how complex ecological networks will reorganize in the future.

Classified as: conservation, climate change, landscape, environmental, biodiversity, Andrew Gonzalez, habitat, ecosystem, migration, Nature Ecology and Evolution, species, corridor
Published on: 9 May 2017

Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change, the Honourable Catherine McKenna announced a $50,000 grant from Natural Resources Canada’s Program for Energy Research and Development (PERD) to help TeamMTL participate in the international Solar Decathlon, to be held next year in Dezhou, China.

Classified as: climate change, innovation, urban design, food and sustainability, green housing
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Published on: 6 Apr 2017

Congratulations to M.Sc. candidate Émile Brisson-Curadeau (Supervisor: Prof. Kyle Elliott, NRS) for capturing second place in "NSERC -" Science, action!" competition contest for "La sentinelle des mers". 


ABOUT ÉMILE

Classified as: Research, climate change, Arctic, guillemots, murres
Published on: 5 Apr 2017

One of the big mysteries in the scientific world is how the ice sheets of Antarctica formed so rapidly about 34 million years ago, at the boundary between the Eocene and Oligocene epochs.

There are 2 competing theories:

The first explanation is based on global climate change: Scientists have shown that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels declined steadily since the beginning of the Cenozoic Era, 66 million years ago. Once CO2 dropped below a critical threshold, cooler global temperatures allowed the ice sheets of Antarctica to form.

Classified as: science, climate change, oceans, External, Antarctic, antarctica, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Galen Halverson
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Published on: 31 Jan 2017

Institut nordique du Québec (INQ)’s founding partners have unveiled the first foundational elements of the Institute’s scientific program by simultaneously announcing three northern research chairs and introducing its newly recruited director of science and innovation, Louis Fortier. 

Representatives from INQ’s three founding universities made a joint announcement of funding for three research chairs supported by INQ, allocated to INRS, McGill University, and Université Laval—a historic first for northern research.

Classified as: climate change, Institut nordique du Québec, Murray Humphries
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Published on: 1 Nov 2016

Traveling and harvesting on the land and sea is of vital importance to Indigenous communities in the Canadian Arctic and subarctic, with links to food security, cultural identity, and wellbeing. A new study by the Climate Change Adaptation Research Group at McGill University however, finds that economic transitions, social shifts, and climate change are dramatically affecting the safety of Inuit during these activities.

Classified as: Inuit, climate change, Arctic, search and rescue, Dylan Clark, socioeconomic
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Published on: 30 Sep 2016

With global temperatures continuing to rise at an alarming rate, predictions for the impact of climate change on plants and wildlife must improve to give scientists a clearer picture of which species are most at risk of extinction.

Classified as: news, science, climate change, Quebec Centre for Biodiversity Science, Dept. of Biology, Research McGill
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Published on: 8 Sep 2016

Much of the influence on climate from air pollution in East Asia is driven by consumption in the developed countries of Western Europe and North America, according to research co-led by McGill University atmospheric scientist Yi Huang.

In a paper published online this week in Nature Geoscience, Huang and colleagues from China, the U.S. and U.K. report that international trade shifts the climate impacts of aerosols -- solid or liquid particles suspended in air -- from net consuming countries to net producing countries.

Classified as: Asia, Trade, climate change, developing countries, Nature Geoscience, climate, emissions, Greenhouse gases, aerosols, forcing, Yi Huang, developed countries
Published on: 6 Sep 2016

Hundreds of 2016 World Social Forum participants will meet to brainstorm new solutions to climate change on August 10 at Percival Molson Stadium.

This is the wild idea of Henry Mintzberg, internationally renowned management academic and professor of management studies at McGill University.

Classified as: Henry Mintzberg, climate change, GROOC, Mintzberg, World Social Forum 2016, groocx
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Published on: 8 Aug 2016

McGill Newsroom

24-year study of spring emergence of Fowler’s Toads creates model for predicting climate-change effects

The ability to predict when toads come out of hibernation in southern Canada could provide valuable insights into the future effects of climate change on a range of animals and plants.

Classified as: climate change, amphibians, climate, science and technology, toads, hibernation, David M. Green
Published on: 19 Jul 2016

“With the wind at his back from Paris and a fresh mandate from Canadians, Mr. Trudeau meets provincial and territorial leaders in Vancouver this week to pursue a national climate strategy.” (The Globe and Mail)

Classified as: Canada, Strategy, climate change, Dror Etzion, climate, catherine potvin, James Ford, Vancouver, Christopher Barrington-Leigh, guillaume lord, paris, national, lea berrang-ford
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Published on: 29 Feb 2016

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

Arctic peoples inherently able to adapt given changes to various non-climatic factors

Classified as: environment, Geography, climate change, stress, James Ford, Nature Climate Change, science and technology, adaptation
Published on: 6 Jan 2016

The environmentalists and green groups at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference, which starts today in Paris, will inevitably call for better leadership on sustainability issues. They will not have to travel far to find those willing to teach them.

Green topics become the norm

The Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University, Montreal, “normalised” the climate-change issue as a core topic a long time ago, says Steve Maguire, director of the school’s institute for integrated management.

Classified as: Desautels Faculty of Management, Marcel Desautels Institute for Integrated Management, MDIIM, Steve Maguire, Sustainability, climate change
Published on: 4 Dec 2015

 

The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP 21, will be held in Paris from November 30 to December 11.

Classified as: climate change, Dror Etzion, climate, catherine potvin, James Ford, Jeffrey McKenzie, Shaun Lovejoy, elena bennett, Bruno Tremblay, Sébastien Jodoin, Christopher Barrington-Leigh, christopher green, guillaume lord, marianne falardeau-côté
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Published on: 27 Nov 2015

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