Dept. of Biology

Climate change is exacerbating problems like habitat loss and temperatures swings that have already pushed many animal species to the brink. But can scientists predict which animals will be able to adapt and survive? Using genome sequencing, researchers from McGill University show that some fish, like the threespine stickleback, can adapt very rapidly to extreme seasonal changes. Their findings could help scientists forecast the evolutionary future of these populations.

Classified as: climate change, Sustainability, threespine stickleback, genome sequencing, natural selection, Darwin, Rowan Barrett, Alan Garcia-Elfring
Published on: 13 May 2021

Victoria Glynn, the public program representative from GARM (Graduate Association of the Redpath Museum), has won the prestigious Vanier Scholarship.

Published on: 13 Apr 2021

BIOL 201 students baked protein-shaped cookies so good even Chef Bruno Feldeisen from The Great Canadian Baking Show couldn't resist.

Published on: 24 Mar 2021

Many species might be left vulnerable in the face of climate change, unable to adapt their physiologies to respond to rapid global warming. According to a team of international researchers, species evolve heat tolerance more slowly than cold tolerance, and the level of heat they can adapt to has limits.

Classified as: climate change, heat, cold, tolerance, species, adaptation, jennifer sunday, Sustainability
Published on: 4 Mar 2021

The Faculty of Science is celebrating McGill’s 200th anniversary with a student art exhibition on the theme of “Science!”. McGill students at all levels and all faculties are invited to submit works in any medium, expressing what science means to them.

Faculty of Science bicentennial committee member, Torsten Bernhard, says the aim of the exhibition is to celebrate science in all its forms.

Published on: 12 Jan 2021

Henry Reiswig, the former Biology professor and curator of Invertebrate Zoology at the Redpath Museum, died on July 4, 2020. You can read his obituary here:

His daughter Amy says: "He died in his lab in the garage, with microscope slides on the warmer, doing what he loved: science." 

Classified as: Public Outreach
Published on: 7 Jul 2020

The glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup has been found to trigger the loss of biodiversity among phytoplankton communities in freshwater ponds. In their experiments, scientists found that while some populations developed resistance to the herbicide and were able to survive exposure at high levels, this came at a cost, with a 40 percent loss in biodiversity.


"The ubiquitous presence of glyphosate in the environment has sparked concerns over its potential health and ecotoxicological effects," Andrew Gonzalez, from Canada's McGill University, said. 

Classified as: Andrew Gonzalez, biodiversity, agriculture
Published on: 4 Mar 2020

Using a new microscopic "fishing" technique, scientists from the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM), Université de Montréal and McGill University have successfully snagged thousands of proteins that play a key role in the formation of the cell skeletons or cytoskeletons. Cell skeletons, whose primary function is to give the cells their shapes, are also involved in things like muscle contraction. They are made up of an interlocking network of protein filaments that connect the cell nucleus to the cell membrane.

Classified as: Research, cell biology, molecular medicine, proteins
Published on: 9 Jan 2020

Crowdmark – an online grading tool developed especially to handle large classes – has been attracting a growing following across North America, with members of McGill’s own Faculty of Science among its most ardent enthusiasts. Kira Smith, reporter-at-large for the OSE, went undercover to find out more.

Published on: 6 Sep 2019

The greater vulnerability of sea creatures may significantly impact human communities that rely on fish and shellfish for food and economic activity, according to the study published in the journal Nature. 

Classified as: sea creatures, global warming, jennifer sunday, rutgers university, climate change
Published on: 24 Apr 2019

McGill University marine ecologist Jennifer Sunday is bringing cutting-edge DNA analysis to the formidable task of tracking ocean species along Canada’s Pacific coast.

Published on: 24 Oct 2018

Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? A new study conducted by McGill researchers finds that, on average, human disturbances don’t appear to accelerate the process of natural selection. While the finding may seem reassuring, this unexpected pattern could reflect the limited number of species for which data were available.

Classified as: evolution, natural selection, Vincent Fugère, Andrew Hendry
Published on: 12 Oct 2018

New work from the Alanna Watt lab identifying pathophysiological cellular changes that may contribute to ataxia of the Charlevoix-Saguenay region, or ARSACS. This work arises from a very fruitful collaboration between labs at McGill including the Brais lab (Neurology and Neurosurgery) and the McKinney lab (Pharmacology and Therapeutics).

Read article

Published on: 26 Sep 2018

Pages

Back to top