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Towards better hip replacements

By Katherine Gombay Some potentially good news for aging Baby Boomers: researchers believe that they have developed a hip replacement that will last longer and create fewer problems for the people who receive them than those currently in use. The secret? An implant that “tricks” the host bone into remaining alive by mimicking the varying porosity of real bones. Interestingly, the key factor that distinguishes the new implant is that is LESS rather than more solid than those in current use, while still being just as strong.

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Published on : 02 Nov 2016

Making Better Use of Science and Technology in Policy-Making

As governments struggle to keep pace with rapid advancements in science and technology, a new report by the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP) and the Canadian Academy of Engineering (CAE) outlines how governments can better incorporate that knowledge in policy-making processes and improve the quality of government decisions.

Published on : 23 Mar 2016

Building living, breathing supercomputers

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom The substance that provides energy to all the cells in our bodies, Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), may also be able to power the next generation of supercomputers.

Published on : 26 Feb 2016

Chapters downtown bookstore to close; Victoria's Secret to replace it

The Chapters bookstore at Stanley and Ste. Catherine will be closed and transformed into a Victoria’s Secret lingerie store. ... Despite the upgrades, bookstores are on their way out, said McGill business and technology professor Jui Ramaprasad.Read full article: CTV News Montreal

Published on : 31 Jul 2014

Technology has unprecedented ability to detect and diagnose Alzheimer’s

January 28, 2013 - A revolutionary technology has the ability to detect and diagnose Alzheimer’s disease with unprecedented accuracy. The computerized technique known as SNIPE analyzes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to capture patterns of atrophy specific to the disease in brain structures, specifically the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is still an inexact science, relying mainly on the patient's symptoms and performance on memory tests.

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Published on : 05 Feb 2013