Dept. of Sociology

The Department of Sociology at McGill was ranked 40th in the 2020 QS World University Rankings and 50th in the 2021 recently-released Academic Ranking of World Universities by Shanghai Ranking Consultancy

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Published on: 18 Aug 2021

Congratulations to Golshan Golriz, one of our recent Ph.D. students, who graduated at the beginning of the year and has accepted an Assistant Professor tenure track position at Queen's University's Department of Sociology.

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Published on: 11 Aug 2021

Professor Zoua Vang was recently interviewed for a NBC News article about Sunisa Lee's Olympic gold medal win and what it says about the Hmong American community, resilience and the model minority stereotype.

[Link: : https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/hmong-americans-are-often-obscured-model-minority-myth-why-suni-n1275567]

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Published on: 9 Aug 2021

Nicole Denier received her Ph.D. in 2016 (Essays on job loss and stratification in Canada and the United States), spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Colby College, and then took up an assistant professorship at the University of Alberta. She has published extensively on labour markets and is currently continuing her widely cited work with Sean Waite (also a McGill Ph.D.) on the employment outcomes of gays and lesbians.

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Published on: 16 Jun 2021

Chi-Ian Winnie Yang’s paper, entitled “Marriage Equality or Socioeconomic Inequality? Couple-Level Socioeconomic Predictors of Same-Sex Marriage in Canada between 2006 and 2016", examines whether labour market characteristics and economic resources are associated with marriage among Canadian same-sex couples.

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Published on: 14 Jun 2021

Professor Amélie Quesnel-Vallée was awarded the 2021 Fieldhouse Teaching Award from the Faculty of Arts that recognizes excellence in teaching and mentoring students.  Over the nearly sixteen years of her career at McGill, Professor Quesnel-Vallée has demonstrated all the hallmarks of distinguished teaching; she is a superb communicator, striving to adopt new methods to encourage active learning and inspiring students to both trust in and challenge themselves and to cherish and cultivate curiosity.

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Published on: 27 Apr 2021

Labour unions in the United States have suffered a series of high-profile defeats in union representation elections in recent years, most recently at Amazon in Bessemer, Alabama. While some might think this indicates that workers are not interested in unionizing, available polling data suggests that far more workers want unions than currently have them. The problem, as Assistant Professor Barry Eidlin argues in the Washington Post, is the profoundly broken and undemocratic union election system that currently exists.

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Published on: 23 Apr 2021

On April 9, 2021, one of the most high-profile union elections in recent U.S. history came to a close. Workers at the Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama voted by more than 2-1 against joining a union, following a months-long campaign that drew international media attention. This was a major setback for U.S. unions, who see unionizing Amazon as key to reviving labor’s fortunes. In an op-ed published in the Globe and Mail on April 10, Prof. Barry Eidlin explained both what made the election so significant, and what the loss means for the future of labor.

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Published on: 19 Apr 2021

Emre Amasyali won the Arts Insights Dissertation Award for the Social Sciences and Humanities for his thesis, entitled "The fight for Eden: a mixed-methods analysis of historical educational competition and its legacies", that he completed under the supervision of Professor Matthew Lange. A well-deserved accomplishment! 

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Published on: 12 Apr 2021

The IHSP's Alissa Koski and her colleague Shelley Clark have been receiving some media attention from their recent article:

Child Marriage in Canada

Koski A and Clark S
Population and Development Review (2021).
https://doi.org/10.1111/padr.12369
Published January 8th, 2021

Abstract:

Classified as: Institute for health and social policy, Social Determinants of Health, Child Health, children, child marriage
Published on: 29 Jan 2021

In 2015, the Canadian population crossed a significant threshold, as those 65 years and over now outnumber those 14 years and younger. This historically unprecedented population ageing requires us to rethink our policies in a way that has not yet been fully integrated through all sectors of society, especially regarding social and health inequalities among older adults. Dr. Quesnel-Vallée’s research program responds to these challenges.

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Published on: 26 Jan 2021

Dementia and Poor Continuity of Primary Care Delay Hospital Discharge in Older Adults: A Population-Based Study From 2001 to 2016

 

 

This new paper from our trainee Mari Aaltonen examines dementia and delayed discharge and the association of delayed discharge with discharge destination and with the continuity of primary care prior to urgent admission. The study used data from our partner Population Data BC.

Classified as: From Trainees
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Published on: 25 Jan 2021

Canada is at the forefront of global efforts to end child marriage abroad. Yet this practice remains legal and persists across the country. In Canada, more than 3,600 marriage certificates were issued to children, usually girls, under the age of 18 between 2000 and 2018, according to a new study from researchers at McGill University. In recent years, an increasing number of child marriages have been common-law unions.

Classified as: child marriage, Canada, children, common-law, Alissa Koski, shelley clark
Published on: 8 Jan 2021

The spread of the Internet is shaping migration in profound ways. A McGill-led study of over 150 countries links Internet penetration with migration intentions and behaviours, suggesting that digital connectivity plays a key role in migration decisions and actively supports the migration process.

Classified as: migration, internet, technology, digital connectivity, Luca Maria Pesando
Published on: 16 Dec 2020

In "How COVID-19 May Alleviate the Multiple Marginalization of Racialized Migrant Workers" (published in Ethnic and Racial Studies) Maike Isaac and Prof. Jennifer Elrick assess the potential impact of COVID-19 on the precarious legal statuses of “essential” migrant workers in countries of the Global North.

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Published on: 24 Nov 2020

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