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Michael W. Davidson, a Success in Microscopes and Neckwear, Dies at 65

"Mr. Davidson, who died on Dec. 24 at 65, used sophisticated microscopes to create stunning, psychedelic images of crystallized substances like DNA and hormones, and he contributed to Nobel Prize-honored research about the inner workings of cells. His images were on the covers of scientific journals and, as unlikely as it might seem, on neckwear" states the NY Times. Read the full New York Times article here.

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Published on : 20 Jan 2016

Cost burden of Quebec’s carbon market seen as modest

By Chris Chipello, McGill Newsroom Study by McGill researchers assesses short-run impacts on households, industries The cost burden of Quebec’s carbon-pricing policy, is likely to be modest across income groups and industries, according to a McGill University research team.

Published on : 20 Jan 2016

Nearing the limits of life on Earth

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom Failure to find active microbes in coldest Antarctic soils has implications for search for life on Mars

Published on : 19 Jan 2016

Human sounds convey emotions better than words do

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom Brain uses “older” systems/structures to preferentially process emotion expressed through vocalizations

Published on : 18 Jan 2016

Andrew Potter to head the MISC

The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada (MISC) has announced that Andrew Potter, Editor of the Ottawa Citizen, has been appointed to the position of Director of the Institute for a three-year term effective August 2016.

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Published on : 12 Jan 2016

A ‘printing press’ for nanoparticles

Gold nanoparticles have unusual optical, electronic and chemical properties, which scientists are seeking to put to use in a range of new technologies, from nanoelectronics to cancer treatments.

Published on : 07 Jan 2016

Overcoming hurdles to Arctic climate change adaptation

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom Arctic peoples inherently able to adapt given changes to various non-climatic factors

Published on : 06 Jan 2016

Droughts hit cereal crops harder since 1980s

Drought and extreme heat events slashed cereal harvests in recent decades by 9% to 10% on average in affected countries – and the impact of these weather disasters was greatest in the developed nations of North America, Europe and Australasia, according to a new study led by researchers from McGill University and the University of British Columbia.

Published on : 06 Jan 2016

$5M for Malaria, Tuberculosis Drug-discovery Research

University of Toronto and McGill University scientists are leading an international partnership to discover new and improved drug treatments for tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases  -- thanks to a contribution from Merck Canada Inc., as well as an additional $5 million supplement to a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The new funding brings the total investment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to nearly US $12 million since 2012.

Published on : 17 Dec 2015

Divorce: on the decline in sub-Saharan Africa

With education, employment and income levels all rising for women in sub-Saharan Africa, many observers have speculated that divorce rates would follow suit – as they have in much of the developed world.  But a new study by McGill University researchers finds that divorce rates across 20 African countries over the past 20 years have remained stable or declined.

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Published on : 16 Dec 2015

What is your memory style?

Why is it that some people have richly detailed recollection of past experiences (episodic memory), while others tend to remember just the facts without details (semantic memory)? A research team from the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences has shown for the first time that these different ways of experiencing the past are associated with distinct brain connectivity patterns that may be inherent to the individual and suggest a life-long “memory trait”.   The study was recently published online in the journal Cortex.

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Published on : 15 Dec 2015

Cleaning wounds: saline water trumps soap and water

Now, an international team of researchers led by McMaster University in collaboration with the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre has found that soap and water is actually less effective than just using saline water. The findings, which were published in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to significant cost savings, particularly in developing countries where open fractures are particularly common.

Published on : 15 Dec 2015

Quebec ecology student scoops trio of BES photo prizes

PhD candidate Kiyoko Gotanda captured the award-winning photos on her Canon 7D Mark II camera while on a research trip to Santa Cruz Island in the Galápagos in January 2015. The Galápagos Islands inspired Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution almost 150 years ago and have since been crucial to evolutionary biology, including to Gotanda’s own research on Darwin’s Galápagos finches. 

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Published on : 14 Dec 2015