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Undergraduate Research: Mechanical Engineering

Click on the title for full description of SURE 2014 projects in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

MECH-001 Design of Nanomechanical Devices

Professor:  Srikar Vengallatore
Email: srikar [dot] vengallatore [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://people.mcgill.ca/srikar.vengallatore/
Tel.: 514-398-2174

Research Area: Nanotechnology


DESCRIPTION: Mechanical structures have been used since antiquity in engineering design. From ancient aqueducts to the more modern wonders of spacecrafts and robots, we observe the creative use of mechanical elements to inspire and serve. Recent developments in nanomanufacturing have opened up a whole new world of science and engineering. Nanomechanical structures are characterized by their minuscule dimensions (for example, beams, plates, and membranes with thickness of only a few nanometers) and ability to oscillate at very high frequencies. These extraordinary properties are being used to develop new classes of devices for mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, scanning probe microscopy, ultralow power signal processing, and vibration energy harvesting using nanomechanical structures. This field is currently in the midst of an exciting period of explosive growth. Many new device concepts and manufacturing processes are emerging at a rapid rate. However, there is a lack of effective and rational design methods for enabling the creation of sophisticated nanomechanical devices with multiple functionality, high performance, and reliability. This observation motivates our research. We use a combination of theory, computation, and experiments to design nanomechanical devices for sensing, signal processing, and energy harvesting.

TASKS: Design nanomechanical structures using a combination of theory, computation, and experiments.

DELIVER: Document research activities in the form of a Final Report and prepare a poster.

Positions Available: 2
 

MECH-002 Design and Fabrication of Bio-ceramic Bone Implants through Binder-jetting Process

Professor: Yaoyao Fiona Zhao
Email: yaoyao [dot] zhao [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: https://sites.google.com/site/admlmcgill/
Tel.: 514-398-2523

Research Area:  Additive Manufacturing (3D printing) for Design and Biocompatible Materials


DESCRIPTION: This project looks into the design and fabrication of craniofacial bone implants made from bio-compatible ceramic composites. The fabrication process is a binder-jetting additive manufacturing process. Additive manufacturing (AM) is a layer-by-layer technique for producing 3D objects directly from a digital model. It has tremendous potential for applications in medicine such as various bone implant manufacturing due to its capability to fabricate extremely complicated geometries. The freeform geometries of bone implants produced using AM can be much more complex than those produced using current manufacturing technologies. With AM technology, a computer generated 3D model can be converted directly from a patients Computed Tomography(CT) scan to produce a patient specific implant with a fit at the micron level. AM technology also has the unique advantage of being capable of fabricating lattice structures with interconnected pores that range from micro‐level to macro‐level, which are crucial for cells to grow and the formation of fibrous tissue. Furthermore, to prevent the implant from failure before bone, the design of the lattice structure must meet desired mechanical properties. In Prof. Zhao's Additive Design and Manufacturing Lab (ADML), a research-based binder-jetting 3D printer is primary AM process that will be used to fabricate bone implant samples. For ceramic composites, process parameters need to be properly controlled to successfully fabricate craniofacial implants. The fabrication process parameter control also closely related to the design of the implant and the composition of ceramic and the matrix.

TASKS: 1) Improve the procedure from the abstraction of CT scan to the creation of lattice bone implant design generation as well as the procedure of FEA analysis of implant design; 2) Investigate proper binder-jetting process control to fabricate a given lattice bone implant design in bio-compatible ceramic materials; 3) Conduct mechanical testing and cell culturing to understand the effects of design, material, and fabrication parameter on cell growth.

DELIVER: Each student has to maintain lab notebook and conduct bi-month report to the research team in the form of presentation or paper report.

Positions Available: 3
 

MECH-003 Algorithm development for locating contaminant releases in turbulent surroundings

Professor: Laurent Mydlarski
Email: laurent [dot] mydlarski [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://people.mcgill.ca/laurent.mydlarski/
Tel.: 514-398-6293

Research Area: Experimental Fluid Mechanics


DESCRIPTION: The ability to locate the source of a contaminant emitted in a turbulent flow is relevant to two distinct problems: i) the ability of animals (birds, insects, sea urchins) to detect food or (the scent of) mating partners, and ii) the ability of authorities to locate a release (accidental, terrorist, or other) of a noxious (chemical, biological or radioactive) substance. The majority of the relevant research in this area has been performed by biologists or roboticists, with little input from fluid dynamicists. The objective of this work is to improve existing search algorithms by rigorously incorporating turbulence physics, building on the work of a previous student who incorporated the physics of scalar dispersion from localized sources within turbulent flows to develop an algorithm for source-locating in a one-dimensional context. The proposed research will extend this work to two and three dimensions. Further attempts to improve the algorithm by including velocity measurements (in addition to those of the scalar) will also be undertaken. Restricted to students in U2 or above.

TASKS: 1) To extend and improve the already developed (1D) source-detection algorithm to 2D and 3D; 2) To benchmark the newly-developed 2D and 3D algorithms against existing (“non-fluids”) ones.

DELIVER: A report discussing the achievement of the above objectives

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-004 Quantification of biogenic ocean mixing

Professor: Laurent Mydlarski (MECH) / Susan Gaskin (CIVE)
Email: laurent [dot] mydlarski [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://people.mcgill.ca/laurent.mydlarski/
Tel.: 514-398-6293

Research Area: Experimental fluid mechanics


DESCRIPTION: The energy balance of the oceans depends upon i) how much energy is input into the ocean (by sunlight, waves, tides, etc.), and ii) how much (kinetic) energy is "dissipated" (i.e. converted into internal energy). However, estimates of these contributions remain subject to measurement uncertainties of certain physical oceanic quantities, as well as a less-than-full understanding of all the hydrodynamic, energy conversion processes in the various layers of the ocean. One such phenomenon, which was neglected until recently, is the input of energy into the oceans by biological organisms. To aid in the quantification of biogenic ocean mixing, an exploratory, laboratory study will be undertaken in which the velocity field generated by swarms of invertebrates (possibly krill) will be measured, by means of acoustic Doppler velocimetry, in the McGill Environmental Hydraulics Laboratory. The purpose of the experiments will be do provide a reference point to improve quantitative estimates of biogenic ocean mixing. Special attention will be required in the post-processing of the data due to possible interference from the invertebrate with the velocity measurements.

TASKS: 1) To perform a comprehensive literature review of biogenic ocean mixing. (2 weeks) 2) To design an experiment in which biogenic ocean mixing of a given species can be quantified. (3 weeks) 3) To construct the experimental apparatus (4 weeks). 4) To perform the required measurements (4 weeks).

DELIVER: A report discussing the achievement of the above objectives.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-005 Hybrid Joints Project

Professor: Larry Lessard
Email: Larry [dot] Lessard [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/staff/larrylessard
Tel.: 514-398-6305

Research Area: Composite Materials


DESCRIPTION: Aircraft components must be joined to each other, either by bolting or by bonding, and each has its advantages. Combinations of both bolting and bonding are known as “hybrid joints”. In the COMP506 project “Design of bonded/bolted composite joints” our modeling team is pursuing a two-pronged approach. On one hand, an efficient modeling approach is being developed (for preliminary design, optimization and sensitivity studies). For this purpose we make use of combined analytical/FE methods. In parallel, we are also developing a more detailed, 3-D FE model for validation and detailed design purposes.

TASKS: The student will work with graduate students that are currently involved in the project. The student will be involved in modeling and testing of hybrid joints.

DELIVER:
The work in this project will help the student develop expertise in i) composite material testing, ii) stress and failure analysis prediction models, iii) design and structural optimization.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-006 Novel Parameterization of Complete Aircraft Geometry for Computational Aerodynamic Design Optimization

Professor: Siva Nadarajah
Email: siva [dot] nadarajah [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.mcgillcompaero.ca/
Tel.: 514-398-5757

Research Area: Computational Aerodynamics


DESCRIPTION: The objective of this research is to create and develop the necessary infrastructure and algorithms to enable the transition from current state-of-the-art aerodynamic shape optimization methodologies to fully-coupled multidisciplinary design environments. The current multidisciplinary design infrastructure under development at McGill is capable of modifying an aircraft wing shape to meet a specified objective. The current framework has been constructed with the assumption that any type of parameterization can be employed to design the aircraft. Current parameterization of the aicraft geometry does not include the necessary industrial-relevant design variables. An approach that still has the flexibility of incorporating a reduced CAD parameterization to perform several exploratory design runs is highly desirable. In this milestone, the student will develop a novel hybrid Class-Shape Function Transformation (CST)-NURBS parameterization technique that incorporates the means to constraint common engineering-based design variables, such as leading edge radius, trailing edge angles, etc. together with the ability to represent the geometry with CAD surfaces.

TASKS: The objective of this task is to develop a new hybrid Class-Shape Function Transformation (CST)-NURBS parameterization and perform aerodynamic optimization of aircraft geometries.

DELIVER: A algorithm for the CST-NURBS parameterization implemented within a current Computational Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Framework. Simulation of a number of Aircraft Geometries.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-007 Efficient Reduced set Radial Basis Function Algorithm for Computational Aerodynamics of Complex Geometries

Professor: Siva Nadarajah
Email: siva [dot] nadarajah [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.mcgillcompaero.ca/
Tel.: 514-398-5757

Research Area: Computational Aerodynamics


DESCRIPTION: In its full form, the Radial Basis Function (RBF) mesh deformation scheme assumes every surface mesh point to be an RBF point. The known displacements at every surface mesh point are then accurately recovered, the scheme is robust and the mesh quality is well maintained. Unfortunately, a geometry defined by many surface mesh points would imply an equal amount of RBF points, resulting in a large system of equations simply too expensive to solve in a reasonable amount of time. Speeding up the RBF mesh movement scheme can be achieved by reducing the number of RBF points. This implies that the surface mesh points which are not RBF points are moved by the RBF interpolating function; thus, a small error accumulates in the parameterization. For example, consider an optimized design produced by using a reduced set of RBF points. A discrepancy between the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) surface mesh and the geometry's B-spline surface is a direct consequence of using fewer RBF points. Since the optimized aerodynamic performance is representative of the surface points on the CFD mesh rather than the points on the geometry's B-spline surface, this results in an error in integrated quantities, such as the drag and lift coefficients, which accumulates as the design progresses. To eliminate this error, a secondary mesh movement scheme to correct the discrepancy between the CFD mesh and the geometry's surface while still benefiting from the considerable decrease in the computational cost from utilizing a reduced set of RBF points should be employed. An algebraic polynomial is adopted for the secondary mesh movement due to its low computational cost. The student will implement the reduced set RBF algorithm within the Multiblock Aerodynamic Design and Optimization code.

TASKS: This algorithm has been developed and validated for simple wing-fuselage configurations in inviscid flow. In this work, the algorithm will be extended to viscous cases and the proper selection of the RBF points will be investigated.

DELIVER: An algorithm that selects RBF points based on the local geometry features and the type of geometry. Simulate a number of flow over Aircraft fuselage and wing in viscous flow.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-008 Combustion of metal powders with air and water

Professor: David Frost
Email: david [dot] frost [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://afl.mcgill.ca/AFL-Research.html
Tel.: 514-398-6279

Research Area: Energy


DESCRIPTION: The combustion of a metal powder such as aluminum has been proposed as an energy carrier to provide the energy source for an external combustion engine – the metal oxide combustion products are then recycled back to metal powder to complete the energy cycle. This is particularly significant for Quebec which is the third largest aluminum producer in the world. The metal particles can react either with air or water if the particles are fine enough. In the case of the metal-water reaction, hydrogen gas is liberated during the reaction which can also burn with air to release additional energy. This project involves experimental studies of both stationary flames, using a stabilized burner, and propagating flames, in a cylindrical flame tube or in a spherical dust-gas mixture contained within a balloon. Metal-water reactions are studied in a high-pressure reactor or flow reactor. The goal is to determine the fundamental flame propagation properties, including flame speed, quenching distance and flame structure, in dust-air mixtures, and reaction rate in metal-water mixtures. Various optical diagnostics will be used, including particle image velocimetry, optical pyrometry and spectrometry, to probe the flame structure. Experiments may also be carried out to study dust flames in freely expanding dust clouds using the field facilities at the Canadian Explosive Research Lab near Ottawa.

TASKS: Assist current graduate students in carrying out experimental tests, analysis of the experimental results, and preparation of a final report including technical drawings of the apparatus.

DELIVER: A final report giving a comprehensive description of all data gathered and technical drawings of the apparatus.

Positions Available: 4
 

MECH-009 Composite Structures with novel fibers

Professor: Larry Lessard
Email: larry [dot] lessard [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/staff/larrylessard
Tel.:514 398-6305

Research Area: Composite Materials


DESCRIPTION: The goal of this project is to develop a manufacturing method for making use of new forms of composite materials. This project will make use of aesthetic hybrid weaves of different fibers and natural fiber composite materials. Hybrid weaves combine different fibers such as carbon, Kevlar and fiberglass. Newly developed natural fibers such as high modulus Flax have potential for use in structures requiring the special properties of these fibers. A suitable resin system must be chosen and the details of the manufacturing method and setup must be developed. The manufacturing setup will make use of different molds that exist in the laboratory The final parts will likely require assembly and finishing steps.

TASKS: Task 1: design and develop design a new manufacturing method Task 2: build prototypes Task 3: finishing techniques

DELIVER: Deliverable 1: New manufacturing setup Deliverable 2: Prototypes

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-010 Propagation mechanisms of detonation waves

Professor: John Lee
Email: john [dot] lee [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/staff/johnlee
Tel.:514-398-6301

Research Area: Shock waves and combustion


DESCRIPTION: Detonations are supersonic compression waves supported by the chemical energy released behind the wave. The propagation mechanisms referred to the physical and chemical processes responsible for the ignition and rapid chemical reactions in the reaction zone. The reaction zone is turbulent and consists of strong pressure and vorticity fluctuations. The project(s) aimed at understanding the propagation mechanisms of detonation waves. To achieve this, the detonation is investigated during it formation and failure for it is during these conditions when the fundamental mechanisms are most prominently revealed. The proposed projects are all experimental and they are 1. the study of detonation limits 2. The study of the influence of wall roughness on the detonation limits and 3. the study of the structure of diverging spherical and cylindrical waves. Students will be working with a graduate student until he/she can work independently. There will be weekly meetings when students present their progress and periodically, write progress report. At the end of the summer, a report of the summer work will be required.

TASKS: Carry out the experiments and design and construct apparatus when required. Also learn to operate the apparatus and the various diagnostic techniques f9r the measurement.

DELIVER: Periodic progress reports and a final report at the en of the summer

Positions Available: 3
 

MECH-011 Processing study of composite honeycomb panels bonded repairs
Professor: Pascal Hubert
Email: pascal [dot] hubert [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://composite.mcgill.ca/Home.html
Tel.:514-398-6303

Research Area:  Composite materials


DESCRIPTION: Composite materials (carbon fibers – epoxy matrix) are increasingly being used for aerospace components because of their weight saving potential and superior mechanical properties over conventional metallic alloys. During service life, these materials are prone to damage and more confidence is required in repair procedures of primary composite structures. As part of a larger research project involving industrial partners, McGill research team focuses on the processing aspects involved in repair in depot conditions. Several critical processing parameters have already been identified in bonded repairs of monolithic panels (such as heat transfer, ingressed moisture, air evacuation strategies). Bonded repairs of honeycomb panels present additional challenges that need to be addressed. An experimental jig, currently being designed, will be used to study the influence of various process parameters on the repair quality. The quality of the repair will be mainly assessed by optical microscopy. Finally, characterizations of the cured patch will perform using differential scanning calorimetry to assess the thermomechanical properties of the repair.

TASKS: With the support of a PhD student and the lab team: - Manufacturing of composite sandwich panels and scarf repairs with in-field equipment - Study of processing parameters affecting repair quality with the experimental jig - Quality evaluation of the repairs - Thermomechanical characterization of composite patches

DELIVER: One written report - One oral presentation

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-012 Sustainability in Aerospace Advanced Carbon Fibre Composites Manufacturing

Professor: Pascal Hubert
Email: pascal [dot] hubert [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://composite.mcgill.ca/Home.html
Tel.:514-398-6303

Research Area: Composite materials


DESCRIPTION: Economic and environmental restrictions (e.g. gas prices, CO2 emissions, noise, etc.) have driven the aerospace industry to reduce aircraft weight, increase engine efficiency, etc. Advanced carbon-fibre composites have been used successfully to reduce aircraft weight through their superior specific properties, as well as through an astounding reduction in part count that comes with single piece manufacturing. As part of a the G8 Research Councils Initiative on Multilateral Research Funding grant: G8MUREFU2 – Material Efficiency – A First Step Toward Sustainable Manufacturing a project supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the McGill Structures and Composites Materials Laboratory research team is focused on developing processes that increase manufacturing efficiency through waste reduction and novel process design. An exorbitant amount of scrap is generated at the ply cutting stage of aerospace composite manufacturing. In this project the SURE recipient will be required to design and implement a CNC controlled ply cutter, as well perform a preliminary mechanical characterization of panel made using recovered carbon fibre prepreg materials.

TASKS: With the support of a PhD student and the lab team: - Design and manufacturing of a CNC controlled ply cutter - Fabrication of composite carbon fibre - epoxy panels using an automotive press - Mechanical characterization of ROS panels

DELIVER: One written report - One oral presentation

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-013 Effect of processing parameters on part quality and interlaminar shear behaviour of out of-autoclave prepreg laminates

Professor: Pascal Hubert
Email: pascal [dot] hubert [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://composite.mcgill.ca/Home.html
Tel.:514-398-6303

Research Area: Composite materials


DESCRIPTION: Advanced composite materials are increasingly permeating primary structural applications in the aerospace industry, amongst others. Leading the charge are high-performance, carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy matrix composites. Improved specific stiffness and strength, and fatigue life in the fibre direction are some of the many design benefits of this class of engineering materials. As with any new technologies and materials, however, this upward trend exposes new limitations that must be overcome for continued growth and success. Namely, typical aerospace structures are becoming increasingly large and elaborate. Processing such parts via the current autoclave approach (i.e. curing in specialized, high-pressure ovens) requires exceptional equipment and operating costs, and complicated production management. The incentive across industries is to convert to energy-saving, out-of-autoclave (OoA) processes and materials that deliver the same level of quality and performance without the aforesaid impediments. Flat composite laminates can now be manufactured via OoA vacuum-bag-only processing with part quality and mechanical properties that approach those of laminates manufactured via more conventional autoclave processing. Still, overcoming the inherent variability observed in cured out-of-autoclave laminates remains a key challenge. The proposed project aims to investigate the combined effects of consolidation pressure, reinforcement architecture, and part thickness on the surface roughness, void morphology, and interlaminar shear behaviour of flat laminated panels processed via vacuum-bag-only curing in a regular oven. Three aerospace-grade prepregs are to be considered with different reinforcement architectures: Cytec Cycom 5320 unidirectional tape, plain and 8-harness satin weaves. Surface roughness, thickness variation and void morphology are to be quantified via through-thickness image analysis of Micro CT scans and optical micrographs. In turn, these findings will be correlated with results from combined-loading compression and short beam shear experiments using digital image correlation, interrupted testing and fractorgraphic analysis to study the influence of processing parameters on principal damage mechanisms. This project fits within the realm of a larger G8 Project with several academic and industrial ties in North America and Europe. The overarching initiative is to develop sustainable tools and technologies for the manufacturing of aerospace-grade composite parts. Through the proposed work, the student will assist a doctoral student with the many aspects of composite materials research, from processing to mechanical characterization. In doing so he/she will receive thorough training, and gain valuable research experience in this flourishing field of engineering.

TASKS: SWith the support of a PhD student and the lab team: - Fabricate angle laminates under various processing conditions - Measure laminate quality - Test mechanical properties of the curved laminates

DELIVER: One written report - One oral presentation

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-014 Manufacturing of composites with natural fibres and bio-based resins

Professor: Pascal Hubert
Email: pascal [dot] hubert [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://composite.mcgill.ca/Home.html
Tel.:514-398-6303

Research Area: Composite materials


DESCRIPTION: The first plastic composite material was made by combining cellulose fibre and a phenolic resin in 1908. Decades after decades, they were improved to the light but incredibly resistant materials than are now commonly used in aircrafts, aerospace and high tech sport equipment. Among the different kind of reinforcement that exist, the most common are dispersed phase composites (plastic-plastic or mineral fillers-plastic), particles composites, fibre reinforced composites (carbon, glass, bore or natural fibres) and sandwich composite (a thick and very light core of material between two thin layers of another composite). Usually, the mechanical properties of a composite increase with the fibre content. For example, the aerospace industry uses up to 60% of long continuous carbon fibres where the recreational industry uses ~30% short glass fibres. Because of the interconnection between the fibres and the resin, the components of composites materials are merely impossible to separate and therefore difficult to recycle. With the growing environmental concern and the rarefaction of fossil resources, natural fibres and biopolymers are more and more considered for various applications such as packaging or car parts. In order to be completely biodegradable, both reinforcements and matrix must be biodegradable. If various biodegradable polymers are known, there are not the best for engineering composites materials. Biodegradable composite are great regarding health and environmental issues but the actual challenge is to improve their mechanical properties and environmental resistance (to fire and water) in order to offer a viable alternative to the current composites made of non-renewable resources. This research project will focus on the materials used for manufacturing biodegradable composites, and especially the bio-based matrix materials.

TASKS: With the support of a graduate student and the lab team: - Manufacturing of composite sandwich panels using bio-based resins and natural fibres - Study of processing parameters affecting laminate quality - Quantify the quality of the laminates

DELIVER: One written report - One oral presentation

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-015 Numerical modelling of unsteady shock reflections

Professor: Evgeny Timofeev
Email: evgeny [dot] timofeev [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/staff/evgenytimofeev
Tel.: 514-398-4382

Research Area: Fluid mechanics, gasdynamics


DESCRIPTION: Reliable predictions on how a shock wave would reflect from an obstacle are of significant importance in a great variety of practical problems ranging from air-breathing propulsion to medical applications of shock waves because various types of reflection lead to markedly different flow parameters (temperature, pressure) and hence could lead to different positive and negative consequences. Recently an interesting discovery has been made that a shock wave reflecting from a wedge may exhibit both regular and irregular reflection pattern for exactly the same shock wave intensity and the wedge angle, depending on insignificant, at the first glance, details of the wedge geometry, e.g. whether its tip is sharp or slightly rounded. The proposed project is aimed at further inquiry into these phenomena using an in-house CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software, with the goal of explaining the reasons of such behavior, conducting parametrical studies and reconciling the predictions of the existing shock theories with the results of numerical experiments. Special Requirements/Circumstances: MECH-430 course (Fluid Mechanics 2) must be already taken (preferable) or the student should be registered for it in Winter 2014 term. A laptop or desktop computer working under MS Windows will be needed to carry out on the project. Honours Thesis project on the same subject is possible, starting from January 2014. The results of the project are going to be included into a presentation at the 20th International Shock Interaction Symposium (August 2014, Riga, Latvia) and later submitted to a refereed journal. There is a possibility that in parallel the respective experimental studies will be performed by collaborators in Australia.

TASKS: 1) Write a matlab code to plot relevant theoretical curves and calculate various parameters; 2) Carry out parametric studies using an in-house CFD software (Masterix.

DELIVER: 1) A matlab code; 2) Results (files) of computations. 3) A report describing/analyzing the above (with images and plots).

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-016 Product-Service Systems: Modeling and Design

Professor: Michael Kokkolaras
Email: Michael [dot] Kokkolaras [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/staff/michael-kokkolaras
Tel.: 514-398-2343

Research Area: Optimal System Design


DESCRIPTION: A product-service system (PSS) is a commodity overarching goods and services. Examples include a vehicle sold together with a maintenance contract; an aircraft engine being leased by an airline; a computer sold with an Internet provider agreement; a geographically distributed car fleet shared by users on an as-needed basis; a mobile phone service that offers device updates. PSSs are viewed increasingly as an attractive means to create additional revenue streams for both original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and service providers. They are also considered to i) create more value to consumers, as their offering is not limited to one-time trade events, and ii) contribute to sustainability, as life-cycle analysis is extremely important to their design and production.

TASKS: The student will focus on an engineering-pertinent PSS example, preferable related to aerospace systems such as aero-engines, to develop models that enable 1) analysis of the product and service counterparts including life-cycle and business plan considerations and 2) quantitative formulation of the integrated product-service design problem, preferably by means of optimization.

DELIVER: A report that includes detailed literature review, problem formulations, analysis models, results and discussion as well as all necessary proof of concept codes (e.g., in Matlab)

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-017 Network Modeling of Dynamic System of Systems

Professor: Michael Kokkolaras
Email: Michael [dot] Kokkolaras [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/staff/michael-kokkolaras
Tel.: 514-398-2343

Research Area: Design


DESCRIPTION: Many of today's engineering problems are too demanding to be solved by means of monolithic system approaches. Different systems need to be integrated so they can cooperate in order to provide functionalities that neither of the systems is capable of providing by itself. For example, different transportation modes can be combined to form an effective and efficient transportation system. In another example, systems of energy generation, conversion and storage must cooperate to satisfy demands while fostering sustainability and minimizing adverse environmental impact. To accomplish that design task, there is a need for developing the necessary theoretical and computational tools for simulation-based analysis and optimization of engineering systems that are built and configured to accomplish not only individual but also collective objectives.

TASKS: The objective of this research project is to adopt a network modeling approach to develop appropriate models that can capture the dynamic nature of systems of systems: their configuration and composition can change repeatedly over time to accomplish varying objectives. The research question is how to represent and assess different configurations and how to account for their changes so that they are taken into account when the individual systems are being designed. The student is expected to study network modeling and apply it to system of systems.

DELIVER: A report on the applicability, usefulness and limitations of the network modeling approach including a substantial literature review and proof-of-concept models for at least one application example of a system of systems.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-018 Development of a novel hip-replacement implant

Professor:  Damiano Pasini
Email: damiano [dot] pasini [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http:\\pasini.ca
Tel.: 514-398-6295

Research Area: Biomedical and mechanical engineering


DESCRIPTION: We are developing a hip-replacement implant produced with a mechanically biocompatible lattice material. Unlike any other hip prosthesis in the market, this implant features a novel hierarchical material with controlled cellular microarchitecture, mimicking the anisotropy and gradient density of the femoral bone, shaped in a minimally invasive implant, and possessing high porosity for osseointegration and prosthesis stabilization. We aim at making this implant design a market ready technology by going through all the technology development stages, including analysis, design, optimization, fabrication, in-vitro and in-vivo testing.

TASKS: Student 1) will work on in-vitro experimentation of the complete lattice implant under physiological conditions. The tests will examine the fatigue life according to ISO standards and the response of the femoral bone after implantation. Micromotion analysis will be conducted in both composite and cadaver femurs to investigate the performance predictions and to prove implant safety. Student 2) will work on design of tailored lattice structures for orthopedic implants, with a particular focus on fatigue performance. This will entail designing lattice structures to satisfy the competing requirements of bone ingrowth, manufacturing constraints, and fatigue resistance.

DELIVER: Student 1) The work will include experimental design, manufacturing test jigs, statistical analysis of data, along with validating predictive numerical models. This work will play a crucial role in the development of the technology and will be the basis for moving into pre-clinical trials. Student 2) The student will work on predicting mechanical and fatigue properties of the designed lattice structures, along with exploring different additive manufacturing techniques to create the lattice structures such as electron beam melting (EBM) and Selective Laser Melting (SLM). The samples will be manufactured and assessed by micro CT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to compare the variation between the designed and manufactured components. The predicted fatigue performance will be validated with experimental models.

Positions Available: 2
 

MECH-019 Micro-mechanics of vascular tissue

Professor:  Rosaire Mongrain
Email: rosaire [dot] mongrain [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://people.mcgill.ca/rosaire.mongrain/
Tel.: 514-398-1576

Research Area: Biomedical Engineering


DESCRIPTION: Vascular tissue rupture is a common phenomenon associated with many catastrophic cardiovascular diseases including coronary plaque rupture, aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm rupture. An early biomechanical model relating the fibrous cap thickness, the stress amplitude and the size of the lipid pool suggested that high stresses occur at the plaque shoulders and is more severe with thin cap and large lipid pool. However, clinically observed ruptured plaque morphologies reveal that in a non negligible fraction (about 25 % - 30 %) of patients, the ruptures do not occur at the shoulders and can manifest at low stress. The main hypothesis is that toughness is the principal physical property governing vascular tissue rupture. The project is about characterizing the mechanical properties of the meso-scale structures of atherosclerotic plaques (calcic, fibrotic and lipidic plaque inclusions). The candidate will be trained to use the new micro-indenter Nanovea (Model M1). In the case of atherosclerotic tissue, stiffness and toughness will be characterized using small specimens in the size range of about 2 mm X 2 mm to about 8 mm X 8 mm corresponding to excised fibrous caps. Human atherosclerotic specimens will be collected at the Montreal Heart Institute. The Nanovea micro-indenter consists of an indentation tip driven in the vertical direction by controlled force (Fig. 1). The sample will be mounted on a x-y stage which allows to measure the stiffness and toughness at several locations thus generating a map over the specimen.

TASKS: Use the Nanovea micro-indenter to characterize the micro-hardness and toughness of vascular tissue.

DELIVER: Report and analysis describing the experimental results.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-020 Stent Design and Testing using Nano-Structured Materials

Professor: Rosaire Mongrain
Email: rosaire [dot] mongrain [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Tel.: 514-398-1576

Research Area: Biomedical Engineering


DESCRIPTION: An endovascular prosthesis is a cardiovascular device which is introduced into an artery to treat different vessel pathologies. For example, stents are used as scaffoldings to maintain an artery open after an angioplasty procedure where a small balloon is inflated at the obstruction site to open the narrowing (stenosis) of the vessel. When the balloon is inflated the stent expands and is pressed against the inner walls of the artery. After the balloon is deflated and removed, the stent remains in place keeping the artery open (see figure below). The proposed project is to participate in the efforts to develop and evaluate a new stent design. The project investigates the possibility to manufacture a stent using cold spray dynamics. This new technology deposits micron thick layers of nano-structured materials. The new materials exhibit interesting mechanical properties that could be advantageous for stent application. The methods used include cold spray dynamics, in-vitro experiments (tensile tests, rheometer, pulsatile pump, annealing treatment) and Finite Element Models (ANSYS software). This project is conducted in collaboration with the Quebec Heart Institutes.

TASKS: The candidate will contribute in the characterization of the mixture and corrosion tests.

DELIVER:  Report and analysis of the experimental results.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-021 Effect of turbulence on micro air vehicles

Professor: Laurent Mydlarski
Email: laurent [dot] mydlarski [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://people.mcgill.ca/laurent.mydlarski/
Tel.: 514-398-6293

Research Area: Experimental Fluid Mechanics


DESCRIPTION: Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are becoming increasingly commonplace. A subclass of UAVs, defined by their small size (as small as 10 cm!), is micro air vehicles, which are currently the subject active research and development, by both academics and hobbyists. The research is driven by both curiosity, as well as a variety of potential applications. As the size of UAVs is reduced, the effect of turbulence in the air in which they fly becomes increasingly significant, and much larger than that for larger, heavier aerial vehicles. Therefore, the proposed research serves to experimentally investigate the effect of free-stream turbulence on micro air vehicles. The research will be performed by flying a commercially purchased micro air vehicle (e.g. a Crazyflie Nano Quadcopter) in a wind tunnel in which the characteristics of the background turbulence in the free-stream air are controlled, well-defined and varied. As part of the project, the student will undertake the tasks described below, in the next section. Both strong "hands-on" and academic skills are required for this project. Restricted to U2 or above.

TASKS: 1) Perform a literature review of state-of-the-art micro air vehicles. 2) Become familiar with the basics of turbulence (having taken MECH 331: Fluids 1 being beneficial to this end) and hot-wire anemometry (to quantify the wind-tunnel turbulence). 3) Design and build multiple grids to generate turbulence of different scales in the wind tunnel, and quantify their flow characteristics. 4) Assemble (if need be) and learn to operate the micro air vehicle. 5) Set up a 2-D tracking system to track the micro air vehicle when flying in the turbulent wind-tunnel air flow to quantify its displacements.

DELIVER: A report discussing the achievement of the above objectives.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-022 Fabrication and testing of a synthetic bone replacement material

Professor:  Francois Barthelat
Email: Francois [dot] Barthelat [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://barthelat-lab.mcgill.ca/
Tel.: 514-398-6318

Research Area: New structural materials


DESCRIPTION: Major fractures or cancer can leave large gaps in healthy bone, which must be filled in order to prevent further damage, to carry loads and to accelerate healing. Human or animal-derived bone grafts are only available in small volumes, require additional surgeries and are prone to infections. For these reasons, synthetic bone replacement materials are becoming increasingly popular. Duplicating the stiffness, strength and toughness of bone in a synthetic material represent a significant challenge, considering the fact that the material must also degrade over time to be replaced by healthy bone. The development of new, improved bone replacement materials is therefore a very active research area. In this project you will fabricate, test and optimize a new high-performance bone-like material made of a polymeric degradable matrix reinforced with microscopic ceramic inclusions. You will use a novel fabrication technique we have recently developed in our lab, and perform mechanical tests (stiffness, strength, toughness) on the resulting materials. You will assess and optimize the effects of ceramic concentration and microstructure in order to achieve a material with the same properties as healthy bone

TASKS: 1) Material fabrication 2) Microstructure characterization 3) Mechanical testing 4) Analyze experimental data 5) Report your progress in weekly group meetings

DELIVER: New bone-like material with basic structural and mechanical data

Positions Available: 2
 

MECH-023 Fabrication and testing of bio-inspired composites

Professor:  Francois Barthelat
Email: Francois [dot] Barthelat [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://barthelat-lab.mcgill.ca/
Tel.: 514-398-6318

Research Area: New structural materials


DESCRIPTION: This project focuses on the fabrication and testing of a novel composite material directly inspired from natural materials such as seashell and bones. The challenge is to duplicate the properties amplifications observed in nature. For example seashells are mostly made of a fragile mineral (calcium carbonate), but they are 3000 times tougher than that mineral. To this day no manmade material can achieve this kind of improvement. Your contribution to this project will be to fabricate and test novel composites that duplicate the unique deformation and fracture mechanisms observed in natural materials. You will use an innovative fabrication technique based on three dimensional laser engraving and rapid prototyping. You will also characterize the performance of these new materials using our small-scale mechanical testing facilities.

TASKS:  1) Material fabrication 2) Mechanical testing 3) Analyze experimental data 4) Report your progress in weekly group meetings

DELIVER:  New materials with basic structural and mechanical characterization

Positions Available: 2
 

MECH-024 Design of a Desk-top-size High-mobility Flight Simulator

Professor: Jorge Angeles
Email: jorge/ [dot] angeles [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.cim.mcgill.ca/~rmsl/
Tel.: 514-398-6315

Research Area: Robotic mechanical systems


DESCRIPTION: The architecture of flight simulators has not changed since their inception in the sixties: six legs that couple the mobile platform with the base platform. Flight simulators have improved in terms of component development and their control algorithms. However, the six-leg architecture has not substantially evolved. The current architecture has seen impressive improvements in terms of its actuators, in going from hydraulic jacks, which stayed untouched for several decades, to the more efficient electric motors with ballscrew joints. However, the main feature of the former has remained: single-degree-of-freedom actuators that call for motors mounted on a mobile base. We are changing this at the Robotic Mechanical Systems Laboratory (RMSLab), Centre for Intelligent Machines. A high-mobility flight simulator is currently under development. The purpose is to increase by a factor of close to 100\% the workspace volume of current systems of the kind. This is to be achieved by reducing the number of legs from six to three, which will be done by exploiting an innovative actuator that was devised and prototyped at \emph{RMSLab}. The expectation is that the innovative flight simulator will be capable of larger-amplitude rotations than those of the state of the art. Moreover, flight simulators with the new architecture should be able to reach points below their base, which is not possible with current systems. Furthermore, the intended applications will go beyond flight simulators, as the novel architecture can be ideal for CNC machining operations.

TASKS: 1) to produce an embodiment of the flight simulator, then the detailed manufacturing drawings; 2) to produce animations of the designed system.

DELIVER: CAD drawings and Bill of Materials; videoclips of the animations of the system.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-025 Design of a Back-driveable Two-degree-of-freedom ActuatorSystem Integration, Testing and Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Professor: Jorge Angeles
Email: jorge/ [dot] angeles [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.cim.mcgill.ca/~rmsl/
Tel.: 514-398-6315

Research Area: Robotic Mechanical Systems


DESCRIPTION: We are currently developing an innovative mechanical transmission with two degrees of freedom and back-driveability. This is to be achieved by replacing the bevel gears of current mechanisms by spherical cam mechanisms. The latter are based on a technology developed at the Robotic Mechanical Systems Laboratory, Centre for Intelligent Machines. In current differential mechanisms, the friction torque brought about by the presence of bevel gears prevents their back-driveability, which is a feature required by haptic applications. One class of such applications involves the transmission of force in two independent directions from the user to a tool that is normally in contact with the environment. The tool can be, for example, the scalpel of a surgeon. As the scalpel comes into contact with tissue to be cut, the tissue exerts a reaction force on the tool, that grows with the depth of the cutting. The surgeon needs to feel the magnitude of the force in order to avoid cutting internal organs. With current transmission mechanisms, based on gears, force feedback is hampered because of the high levels of friction force generated by gears, especially when bevel gears are used. Indeed, bevel gears function, as spur gears, under a combination of rolling and sliding, the latter bringing about friction forces that can be much higher than the force exerted by the environment on the tool. The elimination of gears, upon replacing them with spherical cams and rollers, should allow for force feedback.

TASKS: 1) to design a multilobe spherical cam and its spherical rollers; 2) to embody the design in a differential mechanism and produce the CAD manufacturing drawings.

DELIVER:  A set of detailed CAD drawings and the Bill of Materials.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-026 Development of docking strategies for Tryphons cubic blimps

Professor: Inna Scharf
Email: inna [dot] scharf [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/staff/innasharf
Tel.: 514-398-1711

Research Area: indoor blimps, control, docking


DESCRIPTION: Tryphons are cubic, 2mx2mx2m (approximate size) mechatronic blimps that have been under development for several years at Laval University and UQAM, both participants in the current three-year project. The intended use of Tryphons is for artistic and aerial architecture applications. The blimps have already been demonstrated in multiple artistic performances and exhibitions. Professor Sharf's part in this project is to design better controllers for the Tryphons and to develop a docking interface to allow two or more Tryphons to dock together autonomously. An Honours student in 2013 worked on the first design for a docking interface between two Tryphons. This design proved to work well and has been tested in a recent residency with two Tryphon blimps under manual docking. As well, a physics-based model was developed in MSC Adams to model the dynamics and to test docking and control strategies for the blimps. Starting September 2013, a graduate student is also involved in this project. The student to be hired for the present SURE position will be continuing the work that was begun on the development of the docking interface, with the view to improving it, making it more robust (both structurally and to enable the docking) and to allow docking of multiple blimps. The student will also continue the development of the dynamics model and simulation for docking of multiple Tryphons. Testing will be conducted in the Aerospace Mechatronics Laboratory and possibly in an off-campus location at UQAM or Laval, depending on the scheduling with other team members and availability of locations.

TASKS: Develop and test improvements to current docking design; Construct docking interfaces for docking of three Tryphons; Continue development and evaluation of dynamics simulation Develop docking strategies for docking of two and three Tryphons

DELIVER: Docking interface for Tryphon to dock to one or two other Tryphon blimps. Control strategy for docking and undocking of the blimps

Positions Available: 1
 
MECH-027 Testing of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Professor: Meyer Nahon
Email: meyer [dot] nahon [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://people.mcgill.ca/meyer.nahon/
Tel.: 514-398-2383

Research Area: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles


DESCRIPTION: The Aerospace Mechatronics Laboratory currently houses several unmanned aerial vehicles: the Draganfly X8 rotary craft, model fixed-wing aircraft, the QBall quadrotor from Quanser Inc., and an indoor fully-actuated blimp. Research is currently ongoing with all these platforms with the overal objective to develop autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles. For example, the research ongoing with X8 rotary craft aims to develop autonomous landing capabilities for it, in the presence of ground effect and other disturbances. The fixed-wing aircraft serve as testing platforms for the development of autonomous acrobatic maneuvers. Currently, eight graduate students are involved in different aspects of research and development of these platforms and their capabilities. A SURE student is sought with strong interest and aptitude for research in the areas of robotics, mechatronics and aerial systems. Depending on the status of the above projects, the student is expected to contribute to experimental testing of components of the above platforms and to flight tests with the platforms. In particular, thruster testing and performance modelling will be required for the X8 platform to evaluate the performance of the X8 rotors under different conditions (for example, in ground effect). Preliminary tests on ground effect have been carried out with the X8 platform indoors but further experiments will need to be conducted, both indoors and outdoors. The student is expected to assist with the development of required testing rigs, to conduct or assist with the experiments, process the data and help to develop insights into thruster and ground effect modelling. The fixed-wing platform has been recently upgraded with a new data acquisition system. Further improvements to the hardware and control of the aircraft are anticipated. Over the course of the summer, tests will be performed on quantifying the slipstream velocity emanating from the propeller and the ensuing forces and moments on the aircraft when the control surfaces are deflected. Some wind tunnel tests of propeller may also be performed. The student is expected to assist with these tests, as well as the resulting data analysis.

TASKS: Testing of UAV rotors to determine the ground effect, wall effect and oblique effects; Testing of Draganfly X8 vehicle to determine the ground effect; Setting up and operating test-rigs for the above tests; Improvements to fixed-wing platform hardware operation, design and control; Assisting with slipstream and wind tunnel tests.

DELIVER: Required test-rigs for experiments; Reports documenting the experiments conducted, data processing and findings; DVD with all software, reports and information accrued over the work term.

Positions Available: 2
 

MECH-028 Paper-Based Microfluidic Nano-Biosensors

Professor:  Xinyu Liu
Email: xinyu [dot] liu [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: https://sites.google.com/site/biomedmicrolab/
Tel.: 514-398-1526

Research Area: Bioengineering


DESCRIPTION: Paper-based microfluidics, the technology of manipulating small amounts of fluids in patterned channels in a single- or multi-layer paper device, has emerged as a simple yet powerful platform for bioanalysis. The Biomedical Microsystems Laboratory (BML) is focused on developing paper-based biosensors for use in a wide range of applications, such as point-of-care diagnosis, environmental sampling testing, and large-scale drug screening. In this project, three positions (U2 and above) are available. The research tasks include: (i) the design, fabrication, and testing of two paper-based microfluidic nano-biosensors for detecting multiple disease markers (Positions #1 and #2); and (ii) Analytical testing of a novel biosensing material (Position: #3). The students will perform device design and fabrication, circuit design and debugging, bioanalytical experiments, and data analysis. The students will also have the opportunity to interact with mateirals and medical research groups for collaborations on material synthesis and clinical sample testing. Applicants are expected to have experience in CAD software, and/or chemical bench work. Experience in circuit design and experimentation will be a plus (but not required).

TASKS: Positions #1 and #2: device design, fabrication, testing. Positions #3: analytical experiments of the biosensing material

DELIVER: Positions #1 and #2: Fully functional device prototypes with characterization data of analytical performance. Position #3: Chaterization results of biosensing performance of the novel material.

Positions Available: 3
 

MECH-029 MEMS-Based Mechanical Characterization of Nanomaterials

Professor:  Xinyu Liu
Email: xinyu [dot] liu [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: https://sites.google.com/site/biomedmicrolab/
Tel.: 514-398-1526

Research Area: Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials


DESCRIPTION: Mechanical characterization of nanomaterials could provide important guidelines for synthesis of materials and design of nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS). Silicon-based micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) are capable of generating micro/nanometer actuation displacements, measuring nanonewton-level forces, and performing mechanical testing of micro and nanometer-sized structures. Thus, MEMS-based platforms have been a powerful engineering tool for nanomaterial manipulation and characterization. This project involves multiphysics modeling and experimental validation of a MEMS-based nano-testing device for characterizing one-dimensional nanomaterials (e.g., nanotubes and nanowires). The student will perform theoretical analysis and finite element simulation of the MEMS device, experimental characterization of the on-chip actuators and sensors, and nano-testing experiments of nanotubes and nanowires. The applicant is expected to have knowledge of mechanics and hands-on experience of measurement laboratories. Previous experience of working in research laboratories will be a plus (but not required).

TASKS: Device modeling and experimental testing

DELIVER: A project report with results of theoretical modeling and expeirimental testing.

Positions Available: 1
 

MECH-030 Applications of Condensed Phase Energetic Materials

Professor:  Andrew Higgins
Email: andrew [dot] higgins [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://people.mcgill.ca/andrew.higgins/
Tel.: 514-398-6297

Research Area: Mechanical Engineering


DESCRIPTION: Condensed phase (solid and liquid) energetic materials have sufficient energy density (MJ/kg) to create states of very high pressure and temperature in very short time. This energy release can be used to launch projectiles to very high velocities for the purpose of simulating orbital debris on spacecraft, measuring equation of state, and other applications. It can also be used to dynamically collapse cylinders to create compression in a plasma, such as encountered in the concept of magnetized target fusion. The dynamics of energetic materials is still not well understood, so additional study of how reactive waves (detonation waves) propagate through various geometries is required. Specifically, how detonation waves propagate in cylindrical tubes and two-dimensional planar slabs have presented some surprising results that need to be further quantified.

TASKS: Student 1 will examine development of a hypervelocity launcher using an energetic materials to dynamically implode a tube, resulting in a launch of a projectile that can reach velocities of 10 of km/s. Student 2 will examine the dynamics of detonation waves energetic materials in two different geometries (planar and axisymmetric). Specifically, the wave speed will be recorded and the critical dimension for failure will be measured. Student 3 will examine the application of energetic materials to imploding geometries (collapsing cylinders), which is a geometry that has importance to concepts for magnetized target fusion.

DELIVER: All students will be responsible for designing and building the respective experimental test apparatus. Testing will be done in collaboration with the professor and the graduate students involved in the project. The student will also be involved in analysis of experimental results and constructing simple, analytic models of the phenomenon. Deliverables include design drawings of all prototypes tested, documentation of test conditions and analysis of results. Also, written description of models developed must be provided.

Positions Available: 3
 

MECH-031 Shock Waves in One-Dimensional Lattices

Professor:  Andrew Higgins
Email: andrew [dot] higgins [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Website: http://people.mcgill.ca/andrew.higgins/
Tel.: 514-398-6297

Research Area: Mechanical Engineering


DESCRIPTION: Shock waves are an interesting phenomenon with numerous technical applications and appearances in natural processes, but are difficult to study due to the time scales involved. This project examines shock waves in a one-dimensional mechanical analog, namely, a system of beads sliding along a wire. One candidate system of beads is strong, rare earth magnets that alternate north-south, south-north in their alignment. The resulting waves in this system propagate with a speed of meters per second, making them easy to track with high-speed videography. Shock waves will be initiated by launching a heavy piston into the system, and the resulting wave dynamics will be observed and analyzed.

TASKS: Student 1: Student will focus on developing mechanical model, including prototype fabrication and testing. Student will conduct tests and record results via high-speed videography. Student 2: Student will be responsible for analyzing results using image analysis software, modeling the results using numerical simulations, and comparing to continuum-based nonlinear wave equation models.

DELIVER: Student 1: Student will provide design drawings of all prototypes tested, documentation of test conditions and analysis of results. Student 2: Student will provide documented numerical code with simulation results, and formal write-up of analytical modeling and comparison to experimental results.

Positions Available: 2