Chemical Engineering Departmental Seminar

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Published: 8Mar2021

Chemical Engineering Departmental Seminar


Wednesday, March 10th, 2021 2:00-3:00 PM


Zoom link:
https://mcgill.zoom.us/j/81758517110?pwd=Q3cyWEU0MytHdnVaY2NRU3pnSGZadz09

password: chemeng


"Controlling thermal transport across length scales" Samuel Huberman Assistant Professor Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering University of Ottawa Website: schuberm.github.com
From the global pursuit of clean and efficient sources of energy to the challenges presented by the high power densities in the semiconductor chip industry to the problem of decoherence in quantum systems, thermal processes are ubiquitous across all scales of space and time. Work done in the last decade has led to a number of experimental and theoretical developments that have enabled scientists and engineers to construct an accurate picture of thermal transport at small length and time scales. In this work, we employ and contribute to this modern toolset by testing and pushing the limits of our understanding. First, we experimentally and theoretically examine deviations from the diffusive regime of thermal transport in SiGe alloys, thereby extending current theory and experiment to the study of size effects in thermal transport to bulk materials in the transient grating geometry. Additionally, we go beyond the single mode approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation and develop a formalism to study size effects and phonon hydrodynamics by solving the full scattering matrix version of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation. Using this formalism as a guide, we report the experimental observation of second sound in graphite. Second, we outline how our microscopic understanding enables the ability to engineer materials for specific energy storage and conversion applications. In a selected study, we examine the effect of crystal structure and defects in oxide thin films, in which we demonstrate a reversible mechanism that can tune thermal conductivity across one order of magnitude.

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