Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Integrated Water Resource Management (45 credits)

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Offered by: Bioresource Engineering     Degree: Master of Science

Program Requirements

Research Project (6 credits)

  • BREE 631 Integrated Water Resources Management Project (6 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : To broaden the scope of the IWRM internship experience (BREE 630) in the form of a research paper or 'plan of action' that expands on the water resources management problem(s) or issue(s) examined in the internship. This course is now to be offered both in the Winter semester (new) and the Summer semester (current).

    Terms: Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Summer 2012

    Instructors: Jan Adamowski (Fall) Jan Adamowski (Winter) Jan Adamowski (Summer)

    • Prerequisites: BREE 510 and BREE 655

    • Corequisite: BREE 630

    • Restriction: Open only to students enrolled in the Non-Thesis IWRM program

Required Courses (30 credits)

  • BREE 510 Watershed Systems Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : A holistic examination of methods in watershed management with a focus on integrated water resources management (IWRM). Topics include: integration, participatory management, water resources assessment, modeling, planning, adaptive management, transboundary management, and transition management.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Jan Adamowski (Fall)

    • (3-2-4)

    • Restrictions: U3 students or above.

    • Note: Case studies and a project.

  • BREE 533 Water Quality Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Management of water quality for sustainability. Cause of soil degradation, surface and groundwater contamination by agricultural chemicals and toxic pollutants. Screening and mechanistic models. Human health and safety concerns. Water table management. Soil and water conservation techniques will be examined with an emphasis on methods of prediction and best management practices.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Grant Clark, Nicolas Stämpfli, Dina Schwertfeger (Fall)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken BREE 625 (formerly ABEN 625).

    • This course carries an additional charge of $13 to cover the cost of transportation with respect to a field trip. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

  • BREE 630 Integrated Water Resources Management Internship (13 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Placement in a government, or private sector agency for 13 weeks of full-time work on an integrated water resource management project (35 hours per week). Student shall be responsible for defining a mandate, then performing and reporting on the work/research performed. This course is now to be offered both in the Winter semester (new) and the Summer semester (current).

    Terms: Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Summer 2012

    Instructors: Jan Adamowski (Fall) Jan Adamowski (Winter) Jan Adamowski (Summer)

    • Prerequisites: BREE 510 and BREE 655

    • Corequisite: BREE 631

    • Restriction: Open only to students enrolled in the Non-Thesis IWRM program

  • BREE 651 Departmental Seminar M.Sc. 1 (1 credit)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : To give seminars and participate in discussions.

    Terms: Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Summer 2012

    Instructors: Viacheslav Adamchuk (Fall) Mark Lefsrud (Winter) Valerie Orsat (Summer)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 651.

  • BREE 652 Departmental Seminar M.Sc. 2 (1 credit)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : To give seminars and participate in discussions.

    Terms: Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Summer 2012

    Instructors: Viacheslav Adamchuk (Fall) Mark Lefsrud (Winter) Valerie Orsat (Summer)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 652.

  • BREE 655 Integrated Water Resources Management Research Visits (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Class visits to various firms and agencies working in the realm of integrated water resources management.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Jan Adamowski (Winter)

    • Restriction(s): Open only to students in the Non-thesis IWRM program.

    • Visits occur in alternate weeks; each visit is followed by research and submission of a written report.

  • NRSC 512 Water: Ethics, Law and Policy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : The various legal expressions of the relationship between humanity and water such as those grounded in markets, basic rights, First Nations traditions, utilitarianism and cost/benefit analysis. Public, private and international law, and intergovernmental institutions relevant to the protection and management of water resources.

    Terms: Fall 2011

    Instructors: Murray Clamen (Fall)

    • Fall

  • PARA 515 Water, Health and Sanitation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : The origin and types of water contaminants including live organisms, infectious agents and chemicals of agricultural and industrial origins. Conventional and new technological developments to eliminate water pollutants. Comparisons of water, health and sanitation between industrialized and developing countries.

    Terms: Winter 2012

    Instructors: Timothy Geary, Gaetan Mario Faubert (Winter)

Complementary Courses (9 credits)

9 credits selected as follows:

6 credits of any relevant graduate-level course(s) chosen in consultation with the Program Director.

3 credits of any graduate-level Statistics course chosen in consultation with the Program Director.

Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences—2011-2012 (last updated Aug. 18, 2011) (disclaimer)