Baxter Family Competition on Federalism

Created in 2016, the Baxter Family Competition on Federalism has been made possible through the generous support of Rachel Baxter, BSc’84, BCL’88 and Colin Baxter, BCL’90, LLB’90, who both practice law in Ottawa, as corporate and litigation counsel respectively.

The overarching goal of the Baxter Family Competition on Federalism is to advance research and foster informed debate on federalism by young jurists (including law students, law PhD Candidates, junior legal scholars and junior lawyers) from around the world.


2019 Edition

April 2, 2019: The McGill Faculty of Law and the Peter MacKell Chair in Federalism are delighted to announce the winners of the 2018-2019 Baxter Family Competition.

We received numerous high-quality submissions from a total of 13 countries, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, England, Ethiopia, Germany, Hungary, India,  Italy, Scotland, Spain, the United States, and Zimbabwe. From these, the international jury selected the following:

  1. First Prize: Jan Raeimon Nato (BCL/LLB candidate, McGill University, Montreal) - $5,000
    PDF iconDuties of Federal Loyalty: Lessons to Learn, Conversations to be Had
  2. Second Prize: Berihun Gebeye (SJD Candidate, Central European University, Budapest) - $3,000
    PDF iconFederal Theory and Federalism in Africa
  3. Third Prize (ex-aequo) – $1000, to be shared:
  4. Special jury mention: Breanne Lavallee-Heckert (BCL/LLB candidate, McGill University, Montreal)
    PDF icon‘The Space in Between’: Métis Self-Governance within the Canadian Federation

Find out more.


2017 edition

Here are the winners of the inaugural Baxter Family Competition, picked from nearly 40 entries:

  1. First Prize: Asha Kaushal (Assistant Professor, University of British-Columbia)
    PDF icon Constitutional Jurisdictions - $5,000
  2. Second Prize: Erika Arban (Lecturer, University of Antwerp)
    PDF icon Exploring the Principle of (Federal) Solidarity - $3,000
  3. Third Prize: Eleonore Gauthier (Articling Student, Toronto)
    PDF icon Spending Power, Social Policy, and the Principle of Subsidiarity - $1,000