H. Heward Stikeman Chair in Tax Law

Innovation Week: Putting Innovation in a Box

19-23 February 2018

The Centre for Intellectual Property Policy, the Centre for International Governance Innovation and the Stikeman Chair in Tax Law organized Innovation Week 2018 - Putting Innovation in a Box, which ran from February 19 to February 23, covering subjects such as Blockchain, BREXIT, Big Data, Tax Policy, and more! 

Join the Stikeman Chair during Innovation Week 2018.


Who Pays for Canada? Taxes and Fairness

21-23 February 2018, Faculty Club

Who Pays for Canada: Taxes and Fairness

The Stikeman Chair in Tax Law participated in McGill Institute for the Study of Canada's annual conference

Tensions around tax fairness have always provoked political engagement and lively protest. Such tensions account for some of our nation’s best and worst moments of social solidarity and mutual hostility. On the centenary of income tax in Canada—first collected in 1918—we take the opportunity to explore what “fairness” means. Is it a technical question or a philosophical one? Is it best resolved by statisticians or lawyers? How to subject such complicated questions to democratic accountability? By asking how Canadians have discussed tax fairness in the past and how we might better do so in the future, our exceptionally diverse array of speakers will lend depth and sophistication to contemporary debates.

For more information: mcgill.ca/misc/events/conferences/2018-annual-conference


First Global Conference of the Platform for Collaboration on Tax - Taxation and the Sustainable Development Goals

14-16 February 2018 - New York

The Stikeman Chair in Tax participated in the global conference, as part of the "International Tax, BEPS and the SDGs" plenary on February 15.

Allison Christians speaking

The plenary begins at 1:54:00, and Professor Christians's remarks start at 2:14:54. Watch the segment on UN Web TV.


McGill takes 2nd at 2017 IBFD Global Tax Treaty Commentary moot

Daniel Stysis, Ian Attema, Jacob Heyka, Oleg Stratiev

Students Daniel Stysis, Ian Attema, Jacob Heyka, and Oleg Stratiev (pictured above, sporting spiffy McGill ties) represented McGill during the International Bureau for Fiscal Documentation (IBFD) Global Tax Treaty Commentary moot taking place at the University of Cape Town in May 2017. The team competed against over 20 other teams, beating out the US, France, UK, Germany, and Russia. The team wishes to thank coaches Allison Christians and Robert Raizenne. 


We're on Youtube!

The Stikeman Chair has participated in a number of events that were videotaped. We have created a Youtube channel to share these talks with you. Visit our youtube.com channel to view all the videos, or watch key talks given by Professor Allison Christians on taxation and rights below.


H. Heward Stikeman

The H. Heward Stikeman Chair in Tax Law, endowed in 2005, was created through the generous support of The Heward Stikeman Fiscal Institute and of friends of Heward Stikeman.

Professor Allison Christians, previously at the University of Wisconsin Law School in Madison, Wisconsin, took up the H. Heward Stikeman Chair in Tax Law in May 2012 as its second incumbent.

Find out more about Allison's research in Focus online (April 2014)

About the Chair

The primary goals of the chair are to foster scholarship contributing to fairer and simpler tax rules locally, nationally and globally, and to attract faculty committed to developing a comparative, integrated and dynamic approach to the teaching of the law of taxation.

It was those aspirations that informed the career of Heward Stikeman who practiced tax law for over 50 years.

About H. Heward Stikeman

H. Heward Stikeman (1913-1999) was a two-time graduate of McGill, receiving a Bachelor of Arts in 1935 and a Bachelor of Civil Law in 1938. He would go on to become one of the university's most celebrated graduates.

Among his many accomplishments, Stikeman drafted Canada's wartime tax legislation, co-founded the law firm of Stikeman Elliott and authored a series of books and annotations that are still used today.