memory

Scientists have known for some time that a memory is stored in the brain through changes in the strength of particular synapses, the structures that pass signals between neurons. However, how the change in strength persisted remained a mystery. Solving this mystery has important implications for remedying neurological and psychological disorders.

Classified as: Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro), neuron, memory
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Published on: 27 Jun 2017

Different forms of memory exist in the same neuron and can be manipulated separately

 

Scientists have known for some time that a memory is stored in the brain through changes in the strength of particular synapses, the structures that pass signals between neurons. However, how the change in strength persisted remained a mystery. Solving this mystery has important implications for remedying neurological and psychological disorders.

Classified as: Wayne Sossin, memory, PKM, Columbia, Todd Sacktor, Samuel Schacher
Published on: 27 Jun 2017

The ability to remember sounds, and manipulate them in our minds, is incredibly important to our daily lives — without it we would not be able to understand a sentence, or do simple arithmetic. New research is shedding light on how sound memory works in the brain, and is even demonstrating a means to improve it.

Classified as: faculty of medicine, memory, External, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro)
Published on: 28 Mar 2017

By Bruno Geoffroy 

For decades, scientists have fiercely debated whether rapid eye movement (REM) sleep – the phase where dreams appear – is directly involved in memory formation.

Now, a study published in Science by researchers at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute (McGill University) and the University of Bern provides evidence that REM sleep does, indeed, play this role – at least in mice.

Classified as: medicine, sleep, health, memory, Sylvain Williams, CIUSSS de l’Ouest-de-l’Île-de-Montréal
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Published on: 13 May 2016

Why is it that some people have richly detailed recollection of past experiences (episodic memory), while others tend to remember just the facts without details (semantic memory)?

A research team from the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences has shown for the first time that these different ways of experiencing the past are associated with distinct brain connectivity patterns that may be inherent to the individual and suggest a life-long “memory trait”.  

The study was recently published online in the journal Cortex.

Classified as: brain, memory, cortex, health and lifestyle, Signy Sheldon, brain patterns, Baycrest Health Sciences, Survey of Autobiographical Memory, medial temporal lobes, Brian Levine
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Published on: 15 Dec 2015

McGill researchers have discovered, for the first time, the importance of a key epigenetic regulator in the development of the hippocampus, a part of the brain associated with learning, memory and neural stem cells. Epigenetic regulators change the way specific genes function without altering their DNA sequence. By working with mutant mice as models, the research team, led by Prof. Xiang-Jiao Yang, of McGill’s Goodman Cancer Center & Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, was able to link the importance of a specific epigenetic regulator known as BRPF1 to the healthy development of a region in the hippocampus called the dentate gyrus.

Classified as: Research, learning, epigenetics, memory, epigenetic, McGill News, brain development, hippocampus development, Xiang-Jiao Yang
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Published on: 10 Mar 2015
Classified as: science, McGill, memory, BBC, Fear
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Published on: 6 Feb 2015
Classified as: brain, health, memory
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Published on: 14 Nov 2014

A study just published in the prestigious Nature Neuroscience journal by, Sylvain Williams, PhD, and his team, of the Research Centre of the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University, opens the door towards better understanding of the neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory as well of the role of an essential element of the hippocampus – a sub-region named the subiculum.

Classified as: brain, Alzheimer's, memory, Douglas Mental Health, hippocampus, Sylvain Williams
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Published on: 3 Sep 2014

Dr. Brenda Milner, an active researcher at the age of 95 at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro, McGill University, is a recipient of The 2014 Kavli Prize in Neuroscience.

Classified as: neuroscience, brain, Brenda Milner, memory, Neurology, mcgill faculty of medicine research
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Published on: 29 May 2014

Research from McGill University reveals that the brain’s motor network helps people remember and recognize music that they have performed in the past better than music they have only heard. A recent study by Prof. Caroline Palmer of the Department of Psychology sheds new light on how humans perceive and produce sounds, and may pave the way for investigations into whether motor learning could improve or protect memory or cognitive impairment in aging populations. The research is published in the journal Cerebral Cortex.

Classified as: music, brain, memory, motor networks
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Published on: 12 Mar 2014

Dr. Brenda Milner, an active researcher at the age of 95 at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, has been awarded the 2014 Dan David Prize for her fundamental contributions to the science of memory and the brain. Dr. Milner is widely recognized as one of the founders of cognitive neuroscience–the field that brings together brain and behavior. Dr. Milner, who is the Dorothy J. Killam Professor of Psychology, shares the Prize for the category Present: “Combatting Memory Loss”, with Peter St. George-Hyslop (University of Cambridge) and John A.

Classified as: neuroscience, brain, Montreal, Brenda Milner, memory, Neurology
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Published on: 13 Feb 2014

Guidance proteins regulate brain plasticity

Classified as: neuroscience, brain, learning, Tim Kennedy, Neuro, Brenda Milner, HM, memory, netrins, neurological disorder, synaptic plasticity
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Published on: 5 Feb 2013

November 21 2012 - Dr. Brenda Milner, pioneer in the field of cognitive neuroscience whose discoveries revolutionized the understanding of memory, is being inducted into the Canadian Science and Engineering Hall of Fame today. The induction ceremony takes place at the Canada Science and Technology Museum in Ottawa. Other inductees are physicist and educator Dr. Ursula Franklin and aviation pioneer J.A.D. McCurdy.

Classified as: neuroscience, neurological, Brenda Milner, hall of fame, HM, memory, psychology
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Published on: 5 Feb 2013