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Expert on Trade: Brexit, CETA, and Canada-China free trade

Thu, 2017-03-30 13:26

What will be the impact of Brexit on Canada? What will happen with the new upcoming new Comprehensive and Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) this summer? Also, what can one expect from upcoming free trade talks between Canada and China?

Andrea Bjorklund, Professor, Faculty of Law, McGill University

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Source Site: /newsroom

Expert: OECD report on Montreal’s employment and innovation

Wed, 2017-03-29 13:35

The OECD has released a report titled "City of Talent Montreal: An Action Plan for Boosting Employment, Innovation and Skills": “Montreal has huge potential to become one of the most dynamic cities across OECD countries, thanks to its talented and creative population. Yet the city has not demonstrated outstanding results in terms of job creation and collective wealth generation in the past few”.

Contact Information

Contact: Vincent Allaire
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6693
Mobile Phone: 514-704-6693
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

Improving memory with magnets

Discovery expands our understanding of how we remember sound
Tue, 2017-03-28 14:23

The ability to remember sounds, and manipulate them in our minds, is incredibly important to our daily lives — without it we would not be able to understand a sentence, or do simple arithmetic. New research is shedding light on how sound memory works in the brain, and is even demonstrating a means to improve it.

Contact Information

Contact: Shawn Hayward
Organization: Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398 -3376
Source Site: /newsroom

The making of Antarctica

New explanation links competing theories of the origin of Antarctic glaciation and highlights complexity of climate change
Tue, 2017-01-31 13:12

One of the big mysteries in the scientific world is how the ice sheets of Antarctica formed so rapidly about 34 million years ago, at the boundary between the Eocene and Oligocene epochs.

There are 2 competing theories:

The first explanation is based on global climate change: Scientists have shown that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels declined steadily since the beginning of the Cenozoic Era, 66 million years ago. Once CO2 dropped below a critical threshold, cooler global temperatures allowed the ice sheets of Antarctica to form.

Contact Information

Contact: Galen Halverson
Organization: Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University
Email:

Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations, McGill University
Office Phone: 514-398-2189
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

A surprise advance in the treatment of adult cancers

Researchers at the RI-MUHC have made a discovery that could improve care for about 15% of patients with head and neck cancer linked to alcohol and tobacco use
Wed, 2017-01-11 12:50

A team of researchers at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) has found an epigenetic modification that might be the cause of 15% of adult cancers of the throat linked to alcohol and tobacco use. This is a first in the field of epigenetics and the researchers are hopeful that the discovery can blaze a path in the development of new, targeted, more effective treatments that could arise over the next few years.

Contact Information

Contact: Valérie Harvey
Organization: Communications - Research, McGill University Health Center
Email:
Office Phone: 514 934-1934 poste. 71381
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

Gene discovered to cause rare, severe neurological disease

Epileptic encephalopathy linked to protein trafficking gene
Mon, 2016-11-28 13:10

Researchers have linked a debilitating neurological disease in children to mutations in a gene that regulates neuronal development through control of protein movement within neuronal cells. 

Contact Information

Contact: Shawn Hayward
Organization: Communications Officer - Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-3376
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

Major ALS Research Funding Announced

MNI scientists will study stem cells, genetic mutations to develop new treatments
Thu, 2016-11-24 11:21

By Shawn Hayward, Montreal Neurological Institute

Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute of McGill University are playing key roles in uncovering the mechanisms underlying ALS and will share in $3.9 million, part of $4.5 million in research funding announced on Nov. 23 by the ALS Society of Canada in partnership with Brain Canada. 

Contact Information

Contact: Shawn Hayward
Organization: Communications Officer - Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-3376
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

Olfactory perception influenced by background and semantic information

Wed, 2016-11-23 14:26

When two people smell the same thing, they can have remarkably different reactions, depending on their cultural background. Researchers at the Neuro have found that even when two cultures share the same language and many traditions, their reactions to the same smells can be different.

Contact Information

Contact: Shawn Hayward
Organization: Montreal Neurological Institute
Email:
Office Phone: 514 893 3376
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

Men have a lot to learn about their own fertility

Men generally have limited awareness of those factors that may contribute to their infertility, according to a survey conducted by researchers at the Lady Davis Institute
Tue, 2016-11-22 12:06

The first large-scale study of its kind has revealed that Canadian men generally lack knowledge about the risk factors contributing to male infertility. Research led by Dr. Phyllis Zelkowitz, head of psychosocial research at the Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital, found that men could only identify about 50% of the potential risks and medical conditions that are detrimental to their sperm count and, thus, their prospects to father children.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6754
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

It’s what's underneath that counts

Long-standing recycling of ancient sulfur in billion-year-old rocks supports unique ecosystems in terrestrial deep subsurface and sheds insights into search for life on Mars
Thu, 2016-10-27 13:31

To the naked eye, ancient rocks may look completely inhospitable, but in reality, they can sustain an entire ecosystem of microbial communities in their fracture waters isolated from sunlight for millions, if not billions, of years. New scientific findings discovered the essential energy source to sustain the life kilometres below Earth’s surface with implications for life not only on our planet but also on Mars. 

Contact Information

Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations Office, McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-2189
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom