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Don’t scan so close to me

McGill researcher scans Sting’s musical brain
Mon, 2016-08-15 12:01

What does the 1960s Beatles hit “Girl” have in common with Astor Piazzolla’s evocative tango composition “Libertango”?

Probably not much, to the casual listener. But in the mind of one famously eclectic singer-songwriter, the two songs are highly similar. That’s one of the surprising findings of an unusual neuroscience study based on brain scans of the musician Sting.

Contact Information

Contact: Daniel Levitin
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Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Christopher Chipello
Organization: McGill Media Relations Office
Office Phone: 514-398-4201
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Source Site: /newsroom

Scientists create a new way to categorize music

People’s preference for these musical categories is driven by personality
Tue, 2016-05-10 11:48

A team of scientists from McGill University, the University of Cambridge, and Stanford Graduate School of Business developed a new method of coding and categorizing music. They found that people’s preference for these musical categories is driven by personality. The researchers say the findings have important implications for industry and health professionals.

Contact Information

Contact: Vincent Allaire
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Office Phone: 514-398-6693
Mobile Phone: 514-704-6693
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Source Site: /newsroom

Find a partner who marches to the beat of your own drum

Group coordination is optimized between people with similar movement rates
Tue, 2016-02-09 10:30

By Cynthia Lee

Newsroom

Everyone marches to the beat of their own drum: From walking to talking to producing music, different people’s movements occur at different speeds.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations Office - McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514 398 6754
Source Site: /newsroom

Commercial Music: Opportunities for Artists and Producers at Shutterstock/PremiumBeat

Thu, 2016-02-11 17:00 - 18:00

INFORMATION SESSION

Commercial Music: Opportunities for Artists and Producers at Shutterstock/PremiumBeat

Speaker: Geoff Sauvé, Manager of Artist Relations and Marketing, Shutterstock

Source Site: /caps
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Extremes of sensorimotor control of musical performance: virtuosity and dystonia

Thu, 2015-10-15 13:30 - 15:00
Goodman Cancer Centre : Room 501, 1160 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC
Price: Free

Outstanding sensorimotor skills characterizing musicians have attracted people in the world over centuries.

Public Lecture - Notes on Feeling, Music and the Human Brain (Antonio Damasio)

Thu, 2015-10-22 16:30 - 17:30
Price: No cost

You are invited to attend a Public Lecture entitled “Notes on Feeling, Music and the Human Brain”. This exciting keynote lecture which is part of the BRAMS Symposium will be given by Antonio Damasio of the University of Southern California, USA.

Contact Information

Contact: Deborah Rashcovsky
Organization: Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6047

BRAMS: The Next Ten Years

Fri, 2015-10-23 09:00 - Sat, 2015-10-24 17:00
Montreal Neurological Institute : Jeanne Timmins Amphitheatre, 3801 rue University Montreal Quebec Canada , H3A 2B4
Price: no cost

Tenth anniversary symposium of the international laboratory for Brain, Music, and Sound Research

Contact Information

Contact: Deborah Rashcovsky
Organization: Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6047

LEARN: Music to his Ears

Mon, 2015-08-03 11:38

Masashi Usui has over 18 years of experience playing the saxophone. Yet when he applied to the Master of Music program at McGill’s Schulich School of Music, he was told that he needed to improve his English in order to be admitted.

Read more on The Next Page, the School of Continuing Studies' newsletter.

Practice doesn’t always make perfect (depending on your brain)

Tue, 2015-07-28 09:51

Study fuels nature versus nurture debate

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? New research on the brain’s capacity to learn suggests there’s more to it than the adage that “practise makes perfect.” A music-training study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and colleagues in Germany found evidence to distinguish the parts of the brain that account for individual talent from the parts that are activated through training.

Contact Information

Contact: Anita Kar
Organization: The Neuro
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Source Site: /neuro