Instructors: Please note that we are no longer be accepting exams submitted to us via email. All tests and exams must be submitted through Clockwork’s Instructor Portal, or in-person at our Exam Center located at 3459 McTavish. Instructors at Mac Campus can bring exams to Centennial Center.

Questions? Contact our efstathia.konstantinopoulos [at] mcgill.ca (Associate Director for Exams).

Exam Sign-Up

Sign-up at least 14 days before your exam (applies to all timed assessments)

Universal Design for Learning

Student Accessibility and Achievement works with instructors and staff across both campuses to support the implementation of Universal Design.  

3 Principles of Universal Design for Learning

Make your classroom more inclusive using these principles and simple tools:

  1. Provide Multiple Means of Representation
  2. Provide Multiple Means of Action and Expression
  3. Provide Multiple Means of Engagement

Multiple Means of Representation

Key information should be equally perceptible to all learners. No one medium for representing information is equally accessible for all students (e.g. information conveyed solely through sound is not accessible to learners with hearing disabilities, those who are learning in their second language, or those who need more time to process information.

Tip: Provide options and include graphics to represent complex concepts.

Tool: Visual mapping software, described in the video below.

Hear from other McGill instructors about how they apply these principles in the 3-minute videos below.

Student Accessibility and Achievement was formerly known as the Office for Students with Disabilities & Tutorial Services.  These videos were previously created under the auspices of the "Office for Students with Disabilities" and My Access programming.  Find our new content on our YouTube channel @McGillSAA.

Multiple Means of Action & Expression

Offer different ways for students to demonstrate what they know. Assessments are designed to measure knowledge, skills, and abilities. Providing students with a single method of evaluation (such as multiple choice exams) can create barriers for students with learning disabilities, students who are learning in their second language, or students from different cultural backgrounds. Applying universal design to assessment allows us to address variability among leaners.

Tools: Ungraded or Optional Assignments. Flexibility and variety in instruction and assessment. Described in the videos below.

Student Accessibility and Achievement was formerly known as the Office for Students with Disabilities & Tutorial Services. These videos were previously created under the auspices of the "Office for Students with Disabilities" and My Access programming. Find our new content on our YouTube channel @McGillSAA.

Multiple Means of Engagement

Foster active participation in class. This strengthens learning and the effectiveness of your instruction. Start by identifying potential barriers to engagement in your class. For example, presentations and activity in front of the class can create barriers for students with anxiety or depression, or who come from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Individual learner variability is the norm, not the exception. Provide options such as small group discussions, online discussions, or group presentations.

Tool 1: Record lectures and post PowerPoints.

Tool 2: Different means of Participation

Tool 3: Peer evaluation

Student Accessibility and Achievement was formerly known as the Office for Students with Disabilities & Tutorial Services. These videos were previously created under the auspices of the "Office for Students with Disabilities" and My Access programming.  Find our new content on our YouTube channel @McGillSAA.

10 Tips for Implementing Universal Design for Learning in Your Class

  1. Facilitate the production of class notes.
  2. Provide electronic handouts ahead of class.
  3. Suggest electronic versions of textbooks where available.
  4. Include in your course outline a statement welcoming diverse learners:
  5. As the instructor of this course I endeavor to provide an inclusive learning environment. However, if you experience barriers to learning in this course, do not hesitate to discuss them with me and Student Accessibility and Achievement, 514-398-6009.
  6. Wherever possible design an exam that includes time for students to review their work.
  7. Avoid assessing students through one type of evaluation (e.g. multiple choice).
  8. Use audio or video recording whenever available for classes.
  9. Use myCourses proactively (e.g. online discussions, supplementary material, audio feedback).
  10. Be creative about alternating learning activities (e.g. group work).
  11. Reward engagement and participation rather than penalizing non-attendance.
Sound like a lot? Consider adding one element each time you revisit a course.

Additional Resources

Want to share your tip or personal experience around inclusive practice with us? Any questions or concerns you would like to discuss? Send us your feedback!

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