Ph.D. Students

Jilefack Amin Ngami

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Monica Anne Batac

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Sonia Ben Soltane

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Annabelle Berthiaume

Bio

Annabelle Berthiaume started her Ph.D. at McGill’s School of Social Work in Fall 2015. She has been involved as a research assistant in projects across different topics, including Montreal's condo market, preoccupations of the nonprofit sector towards funding issues and philanthropy’s relations with grantees. Currently, she is collaborating with an interuniversity and interdisciplinary research center, the Montreal Research Laboratory on Canadian Philanthropy (https://philab.uqam.ca/en/), and a coalition of community organizations preoccupied by recent changes in funding practices.

Research

For her doctoral research, Annabelle is focusing on the coexistence of different community interventions aimed towards intergenerational poverty in a low-income neighborhood in Montreal. She is critically analyzing the impact of these different interventions (public, private, community) in order to improve upon current trends. By doing so, Annabelle wishes to participate in the renewal of the reflection on community action practices facing today’s issues.

Publications

Berthiaume et Lefèvre. (2020). « The Cost of Social Inequalities: Philanthropic Field Building in Quebec through the Creation of the Collectif des fondations », in Elson, Fontan, Lefèvre (ed.), Philanthropic Foundations in Canada: Landscapes, indigenous peoples and pathways to change, UK: Alliance Publishing

Berthiaume. (2019). « Mothers in the “Funnel” of Activation: Parenting Support in Local Services for Children and Families », Working Paper, Torino: Collegio Carlo Alberto

Berthiaume. (2019). L’entonnoir de l’activation : l’implication des mères dans les organismes enfance, jeunesse, famille. Conference paper, Montreal : Partenariat Familles en mouvance, INRS

Lefèvre et Berthiaume. (2019). « Les fondations philanthropiques face au cimetière de l’innovation sociale : du malaise des organismes financés à celui d’un bailleur de fonds » », in Klein, Boucher, Camus et Noiseux (ed.), Trajectoires d’innovation, Québec : Presses de l’Université du Québec

Berthiaume. (2018). « Salaire critique : sur la rémunération des stages et le salaire étudiant avec George Caffentzis », Histoire Engagée, Nov. 13th

Belley, Berthiaume et Simard. (2018). « L’exploitation n’est pas une vocation. La lutte pour la rémunération des stages et la fin du travail gratuit à l’école », in Robert et Toupin (ed.), Le travail invisible au Québec, une anthologie, Montreal : Éditions du Remue-Ménage

Lefèvre et Berthiaume. (2017). « Les relations entre l'État et les organismes communautaires au Québec, des comités de citoyens aux partenariats public-philanthropie (1960-2016) », Revue française d'administration publique, 163(3), p.491-506, doi 10.3917/rfap.163.0491

Berthiaume et Lefèvre. (2017). « Une mobilisation improbable : la prise de parole publique des fondations québécoises contre les inégalités », in Fontan, Elson, Lefèvre (ed.) Les fondations philanthropiques : de nouveaux acteurs politiques ? Québec : Presses de l’Université du Québec, p.255-282

Berthiaume. (2017). « Légitimité, égalité et finalités : Quels projets pour la démocratie participative et l’action communautaire ? », Nouvelles pratiques sociales, 29(1), p.9-19, doi 10.7202/1043389ar

Lefèvre et Berthiaume. (2017). « Le choix des donataires. Ethnographie d’un comité de sélection d’une fondation philanthropique », Ethnographiques, (34)

Lefèvre et Berthiaume. (2016). Béati, un modèle de philanthropie alternatif? Accompagner le changement social en le finançant. Cahier de recherche #12. Montreal: PhiLab

Berthiaume. (2016). De la lutte à la gestion de la pauvreté. Quand la philanthropie s’en mêle !, Montreal : Institut de santé et société, UQAM  

Popular and professional publications

Berthiaume. (2019). « Le burn-out volontaire. Quand l’implication bénévole devient une charge mentale chez les mères », Liaisons, October 29th

Berthiaume, Bourdon et Mathieu. (2019). « Luttes pour un salaire : rétroactif, en espèces, pour tout et maintenant », Acta, October 30th

Poirier, Berthiaume, Halloran, Boisjoli. (2019). « Étudier c’est travailler – entretien avec les CUTE », Ballast, July 27th

Gonzales del Valle, Simard, Berthiaume, Marcoux et Merteuil. (2019). « L’exploitation n’est pas une vocation. Grève des stages, grève féministe », Revue Contretemps, May 13th

Berthiaume. (2018). « De la charité à la solidarité: bilan de la deuxième Promenade de Jane », Gilles en vrac blog, May 9th

Berthiaume. (2016). « Place au philanthrocapitalisme », Le Devoir, April 1st

Berthiaume. (2016). « Quel profit pour le philanthrocapitalisme? », Huffington Post Québec, March 19th

Contact Information

annabelle.berthiaume [at] mail.mcgill.ca (Email) or Email2


Katrina Vera Cherney

Bio

Prior to beginning her doctoral degree at McGill, Katrina worked with children, youth and families living in, or at risk of, poverty and social exclusion, in various communities in Montreal and internationally.  These experiences profoundly influenced her research interests, and, more specifically, her desire to understand how social, economic and political contexts impact the lives of vulnerable individuals and communities.  Katrina completed her Bachelor of Arts in History and Education and Master of Social Work at McGill.

Research

Katrina’s research focus is on understanding and addressing various dimensions of child and family poverty.  She is particularly interested in how students living in poverty experience education systems and institutions, and how this impacts educational outcomes.  Katrina is a research fellow at the Centre for Children and Families, through which she is involved in projects related to alternative programming for youth in the justice system, and cross-cultural understandings of the concept of child and youth ‘supervision’, both within and outside of the context of the child welfare system.  She is also assisting with the planning of the 6th Conference of the International Society for Child Indicators, which will bring together researchers, policy-makers, practitioners and advocates from around the world to discuss and promote child-centered innovations and opportunities for change.

Publications

Peer-reviewed papers

Rothwell, D.W., Khan, M. N., & Cherney, K. (2016). Building financial knowledge is not enough: Financial self-efficacy as a mediator in the financial capability of low-income families.  Journal of Community Practice (in print). 

Peer-reviewed posters

Cherney, K., Van Wert, M., Filippelli, & Trocmé, N. (2017, January) Infant maltreatment in Canada:Predictors of Substantiation.  Presented at the meeting of the Society for Social Work and Research, New Orleans, LA.

Cherney, K., & Rothwell, D. W. (2016, January). An examination of inequalities in post-secondary education savings programs in Canada. Presented at the meeting of the Society for  Social Work and Research, Washington, DC.

Gjertson, L. Porto, N., Rothwell, D.W., & Cherney, K. (2015). Child Saving Accounts: A Cross-National Comparison of Polices in Canada and the United States.  The Golden Age of Evidence Based Policy.  Association for Public Policy Analysis & Management.  Miami, Florida.  USA. 

Contact Information

katrina.cherney [at] mail.mcgill.ca (Email)


Maya Fennig

Bio

An Israeli social worker and human rights activist, Maya Fennig is dedicated to researching and designing innovative, culturally responsive interventions that advance the wellbeing of refugees and marginalized people. Maya has worked extensively in the psychosocial field supporting war affected populations. She is currently a research associate at the Centre for Research on Children War Violence and Arts based Technologies (CREATE) and member of the Centre’s research group on children and global adversity, funded by Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FQRSC). In 2015, Maya was awarded a prestigious Jeanne Sauve Public Leadership Fellowship to address issues of diversity and refugee integration in Quebec, Canada. In her native country, Maya worked, for two years, as the research officer and coordinator of Empowerment & Resilience in Children Everywhere (ERICE). This Italian-Palestinian-Israeli research group works to promote the mental health of Arab children and families. At the same time, Maya developed the first university led program in Israel that trains African refugees to become lay health workers (LHW’s), which she continues to remotely lead today.

Throughout her childhood Maya’s mother and grandparents, who had both escaped persecution and extreme violence in their countries, instilled in her a very personal sense of obligation towards other victims of war and dictatorship. It was therefore no surprise that in 2006, when African refugees began to arrive in Israel, Maya found herself on the frontline, volunteering with NGOs. There, she provided much needed support and organized numerous demonstrations to advocate for the rights of refugees. These experiences led Maya to found The Refugee Voice newspaper, which she successfully managed for three years. This nonprofit social venture is the first media source in Israel, authored by and for African refugees and asylum seekers living in Israel; one that expresses their voice and speaks for them in their own language. With the support of The UN Refugee Agency, Ha’artez (one of Israel’s leading newspapers) and dozens of volunteers, the newspaper’s printed and electronic editions have reached more than 150,000 readers in Israel and abroad, raising national and international awareness about refugee issues.

Maya earned a Bachelor of Social Work (honours) at TelAviv University in 2011 and a Master of Social Work in 2014 from Washington University in St. Louis.

Research

Maya is currently pursuing a PhD at McGill University’s School of Social Work under the supervision of Dr. Myriam Denov. Maya’s doctoral research examines the effects of social and cultural factors on Eritrean refugees’ mental health with the goal of developing a novel, culturally sensitive adaptation framework for working with Eritrean refugees. This framework is effectively a set of guidelines which will assist researchers and practitioners in creating adapted mental health interventions that reflect Eritrean refugees’ unique needs and worldviews. The development of this framework will be done in a bottom-up manner focusing on Eritrean refugees’ culturally distinctive ways of ‘knowing’, helping and healing. Maya’s longterm goal is to improve the access, equity and quality of psychosocial services for underserved refugee and migrant populations.

Publications

Fennig, M (in press). [Review of the book Social, Cultural and Clinical Aspects of Ethiopian Immigrants in Israel, by  Eliezer Witztum & Nimrod Grisaru (Eds), Beer-Sheva: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Press, 2014], Transcultural Psychiatry Journal.

Fennig, M. (2016). Let's Remember Israel's Refugees From Sudan and Eritrea. The Canadian Jewish News. Retrieved from: http://www.cjnews.com/perspectives/ideas/lets-remember-israels-refugees-...

Fennig, M., Krispin O., Apter A., Masallha S. & Fennig M. (2015). ERICE Project for Arab-Israeli Cooperation in Child Mental Health. In Lerner A. (Ed), Cultural Competency in Mental Health in Israel (pp. 59-64). Israel: Ministry of Health Publications.

Contact Information

Office: 3438 McTavish St., room 204  

maya.fennig [at] mail.mcgill.ca (Email)


Tareq Yahya Hardan

Bio

After Finishing my MSW at McGill in 2009, I joint social work teaching team since 2009 in Al-Quds University (AQU) and I was part of helping in its efforts to foster linkages between the university and the community. Also, founded the Kufer Aqeb Community Advocacy Center in 2013 which is dealing with various issues related to East Jerusalem such as access and quality of education in poor neighborhoods, residency rights, welfare benefits and other social services.

Besides being a community organizer in various Jerusalem-based community organizations, my work today focuses on accessibility to Higher Education, Refugees, Community Organizing, Marginalization, PTSD, Nation-Building and Social policy as they intersect with people's social and economic rights

Research

  • Higher Education and Social Work Education
  • Research in Social Work
  • Social Services Design and Social Entrepreneurship
  • Community Practice
  • Displacement and Refugees.

Publications

Labadi, Fadwa,  Hardan, Tareq. (2016). “Married women, split residency, and the wall in Jerusalem”. Jerusalem Quarterly Journal, Vol. 65 No. 5. http://www.palestine-studies.org/jq/fulltext/198348

Hardan, Tareq, & Vladu, Valentin (2015). “Establishing minimum Quality standards for services to people with disabilities in Palestinian institutions” (In Arabic). Ministry of Social Affairs, Ramallah, Palestinian Territories.

Zu`bi, Himmat, Hardan, Tareq (2013) “The Perception of Palestinian Civil Society Organizations on Human and Bodily Rights” ( In Arabic), Al-Qaws for Sexual and Gender Diversity in Palestinian Society, Haifa, Israel.

Hardan, Tareq, Morita, Satoshi, & Iwakuni, Sawa (2012) “Report of Survey Results on Life and Education Environment of Children and Youths in Jerusalem Governorate”.  Kokkyo naki Kodomotachi (KnK) in Palestine, Al-Ayzaria, West Bank, Palestinian Territories.

Hardan, Tareq (2011). “White paper on Al-Quds University Campus safety” (In Arabic). Community Action Center, Al-Quds University, Abu Dis Campus, West Bank, Palestinian Territories.

Contact Information

3506 University Street
Room 102, Wilson Hall,
Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7
Tel.: 514-398-6717

tareq.hardan [at] mail.mcgill.ca (E-mail)


Lindsey Jones

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Hanna Kim

Bio

Hanna Kim is currently a PhD student at McGill University and a registered social worker in the province of Ontario. She completed her MSW degree at the University of Toronto specializing in mental health and health. Hanna is committed to research, teaching, and practice. Her specialized focus has been in working with immigrant and refugee populations from settlement issues to cross-cultural mental health. Other research experience includes evaluating and collecting data on youth mindfulness programs and afterschool programs, cyberbullying in schools, and online counselling. She has taught and facilitated workshops in the community working closely with practitioners such as settlement workers and health care providers for older adults. Hanna has provided counselling both online and in-person with individuals experiencing issues related to trauma, relationships and family, intimate partner abuse, self-esteem, identity, anxiety and mood disorders, substance use, and risk/crisis management.

Research

As a doctoral student, she hopes to inform policy and practice through her work with refugee populations. Her other areas of interest include emerging adulthood, identity, mental health, trauma and resilience, and international social work. Hanna’s doctoral research aims to explore refugee women’s experiences living in refugee camps through narrative and art.

Publications

Kahn, S., Alessi, E. J., Olivieri, C., Woolner, L, & Kim, H. (2016). Supporting the wellbeing of LGBT forced migrants in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Tsang, A. K. T., & Kim, H. (2010, September). Cross-cultural mental health: The SSLD approach. In S. K. Min (Ed). Proceedings of the 1st Seoul International Conference on Multi-Culture Society and Mental Health. Seoul: Seoul Municipal Eunpyeong Hosp

Contact Information

hanna.kim [at] mail.mcgill.ca (Email)


Lukas Labacher

Bio

Lukas Labacher is a first year doctoral student in the School of Social Work, and a recent graduate from the Faculty of Education at McGill University. As a recipient of a Leadership in International Development Graduate Research Award from the Institute for the Study of International Development, and an Entrance Fellowship from the School of Social Work, his doctoral studies are being co-supervised by Dr. Wendy Thomson, director of the School of Social Work, and Dr. Claudia Mitchell, a James McGill professor at the Faculty of Education. Alongside his academic studies, Lukas is working as a grants and ethics proposal writer at the Participatory Cultures Laboratory at McGill University.

Research

Continuing onwards from his master’s research studying how students use mobile phones in South Africa and Canada to facilitate discussion about HIV and AIDS, Lukas’ doctoral studies will focus on how young girls living in rural South Africa can use cell phones and innovations in social networking platforms to affect social change in their communities. Stemming from his undergraduate work beginning at The University of Western Ontario (B.A., Honours Psychology), Lukas’ passion is studying how people can influence each other through exciting and innovative technologies.

Publications

Book Chapters:

Labacher, L., De Lange, N., Mitchell, C., Moletsane, R., & Geldenhys, M. (2012). What can a visual researcher do with a storyboard? In E-J Milne, C. Mitchell, & N. De Lange (Eds.), The handbook of participatory video (pp. 149-163). Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.

Peer-reviewed Journals

Labacher, L., & Mitchell, C. (2013). Talk or text to tell? How young adults in Canada and South Africa prefer to receive STI results, counseling, and treatment updates in a wireless world. Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives, 1-12. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2013.798379

K., Labacher, L., & Murray, J. (2011). Rights to expression in the age of AIDS: Girls speak out about HIV and sexuality through digital photography. Girlhood Studies, 4(1), 156-167. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3167/ghs.2011.040110

Selected Conference Presentations:

Labacher, L., Mitchell, C., & Murray, J. (September, 2013). Girls and their social media practices: Critical readings on sexual health and policy making from the ground up. Presented Paper. International Social Media and Society Conference, Halifax, NS. 14-15 September

Labacher, L., & Mitchell, C. (July, 2012). How do you want to know? The preferred mode of communicating STI test results with partners, parents, and health professionals in a wireless world.  Poster Presentation. AIDS 2012: The XIXth International AIDS Conference, Washington, DC. 22–27 July

Mitchell, C., Labacher, L., De Lange, N, Moletsane, R., & Geldenhys, M. (September, 2011). What can a PV researcher do without a camera? Storyboarding in the video making process.  Presented Paper. Second International Visual Research Methods Conference, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 13–15 September.

Contact Information

Email: lukas.labacher [at] mail.mcgill.ca

Laboratory website: participatorycultureslab.com


Tracey Lavoie

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Eunyoung Lee

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Jaime Lenet

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Susan Mintzberg

Bio

Susan is a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Work at McGill University. Her research explores the role of families in psychiatry with a focus on the relationship between family members and psychiatric professionals and a particular interest in collaboration between the two groups. Susan completed her master’s degree (MSW) at McGill University where she trained in family therapy. Her final master’s project (ISP) explored the role of grief and unrecognized loss faced by the families of people suffering from mental illness. Susan received her bachelor’s degree (BA) in cultural studies and French literature from Trent University. Prior to graduate school, Susan spent ten years doing clinical work with families in community mental health at various organizations around Montreal including AMI-Quebec, TRACOM, Project ARC, and Project PAL. Her work focused on counseling, crisis intervention, psychoeducation, and advocacy. Susan’s clinical experience with families has had an important influence on her research. In an earlier career, Susan was a photojournalist with published work in various newspapers and magazines. She learned early on that taking the time to listen and connect with people allows you to see and appreciate the world in diverse ways. She believes that people’s stories can change the world, and so be it through a camera, counseling, or research, Susan aims to give voice to the stories people want to tell. Encouraging connections between people with varied experiences have been an essential piece of Susan’s work and has drawn her to interdisciplinary collaboration. Merging diverse backgrounds leads to fresh ideas and new insights, something she believes is particularly pertinent in the classroom. Together with colleagues Susan has given presentations about shaking up the academic establishment and has published on end of life care as well as the merits of co-teaching in higher education. Susan has taught (and co-taught) courses on social care and family practice at the master’s and bachelor’s level and has regularly been invited to guest lecture on the subject of family involvement in mental healthcare. She has presented on this subject at numerous academic conferences and in diverse clinical settings. 

Research

Susan’s research explores the roles of families in psychiatry with a focus on the relationship between family members and psychiatric professionals. She is particularly interested in exploring the role of collaboration between these groups. Using a qualitative methodology that captures people’s experiences and stories (with an interest in arts-based research), her work aims to challenge and improve how collaboration with families occurs in mental healthcare.

Publications

Mintzberg, S. (2020, April 13). It’s essential to let families back into seniors’ residences- opinion piece. Montreal Gazette. https://montrealgazette.com/opinion/opinion-its-essential-to-allow-families-back-into-seniors-residences/

Mintzberg, S. (2018, May 14). Waiting, with a broken bone, in a broken Quebec health system: opinion piece. Montreal Gazette. https://montrealgazette.com/opinion/opinion-waiting-with-a-broken-bone-in-a-broken-quebec-health-system/

Burns, V. & Mintzberg, S. (In press). Co-teaching as teacher training: Experiential accounts of two doctoral students. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 67(2), 94-99. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/87567555.2018.1558169?casa_token=qrSGWSNyGZ4AAAAA%3AVAAMGPETwqFLxF8VgqD-VMD4qsvj4OXDHgrkQtvELmRp0vOUuLYYBXF5He0RxRUOr4okPgHrgmI

Sussman, T., Kaasalainen, S., Bui, M., Akhtar-Danish, N., Mintzberg, S., Strachan, P. (2017). “Now I Don’t Have to Guess”: Using Pamphlets to Encourage Residents and Families/Friends to Engage in Advance Care Planning in Long-Term Care. Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, 3.

Durepos, P., Kaasalainen, S., Sussman, T., Parker, D., Brazil, K., Mintzberg, S. & Te, A. (2017). Family Care Conferences in Long-Term Care: Exploring Content and Processes in End of Life Communication. Palliative and Supportive Car, 16(5), 590-601.

Sussman, T., Kaasalainen, S., Mintzberg, S., et al. (2017). Broadening End-of-Life Comfort to Improve Palliative Care Practices in Long Term Care. Canadian Journal on Aging, 36(3), 306-317. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/canadian-journal-on-aging-la-revue-canadienne-du-vieillissement/article/broadening-endoflife-comfort-to-improve-palliative-care-practices-in-long-term-care/F5F770EAD1A2360518009FC0E820CF56

Interviews in the Media

Mintzberg, S. (2020, April 16). The situation in Quebec's long-term care facilities amid the pandemic. Guest on CBC Radio One-Radio Noon with Shawn Apel https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-102-radio-noon-quebec/clip/15771329-the-situation-in-quebecs-long-term-care-facilities-amid-the-pandemic

Mintzberg, S. (2020, April 15). Are families of elders in care homes ‘essential ‘workers’? Guest on CBC Radio One- The Current with Matt Galloway https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-63-the-current/clip/15770997-april-15-part-1-are-families-of-elders-in-care-homes-essential-workers-balancing-pandemic-restrictions-and-civil-liberties-national-affairs-panel

Mintzberg, S. (2020, April 14). Should families be let back into long term care facilities? Guest on CBC Radio One- Montreal Daybreak with Mike Finnerty  https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-15-daybreak-montreal/clip/15770731-should-families-be-let-back-into-long-term-care-facilities 

Peer-reviewed and professional conference presentations

November 2019: Looking down- reaching out: The university in the 21st century. Co-presentation with Henry Mintzberg. Annual Joint Board-Senate Meeting, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.

March 2019: The Missing Piece: Collaborating with families in mental healthcare- McGill Student Association for Collaborative Mental Healthcare, Montreal, Quebec.

May 2018: Shakin it up: challenging academic conformity - International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, Urbana, Illinois.

May 2018: Qualitative cafe - Co-presenter with Hagit Sinai-Glazer. International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, Urbana, Illinois.  October 2017: “Shaker”la cabane: refléxion sur l’université actuelle Co-presentation with Henry Mintzberg. Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue (UQAT), Rouen, Quebec.

October 2017: One head two hats: when research gets personal- Global Partnership for Transformative Social Work Conference, Burlington, Vermont.

May 2017: When research gets personal: navigating between two worlds- International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, Urbana, Illinois.

May 2017: Whose voice fills the (w)hole? How family members experience severe and persistent mental illness and their interaction with psychiatric professionals -Panel presentation. International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, Urbana, Illinois.

May 2015: Two heads are better than one: An experiential account of co-teaching.  Co-presentation with Victoria Burns. Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Ottawa, Ontario.

May 2015: The diverse realities of doctoral students in social work: Challenging the norms of academic success- Panel presentation. Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Ottawa, Ontario.

May 2010: Calming the crisis: The integration of families in psychiatric care. Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Montreal, Quebec.

May 2010: Creating Families- the O’Leary experience: An experimental approach to learning about family therapy. Co-presentation with Aline Bogossian. Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Montreal, Quebec.

Teaching

Summer 2019: Human systems: Let’s debrief. International Masters for Healthcare Leadership and Management- IMHL, Desautels Faculty of Management, McGill University.

Fall 2018: Human Systems: Preparing for the collaborative mindset. International Masters for Healthcare Leadership and Management- IMHL, Desautels Faculty of Management, McGill University.

Winter 2018: - SWRK-326 Practice with Individuals & Families II (U2 level)- Course lecturer, School of Social Work, McGill University.

Winter 2017: - SWRK-326 Practice with Individuals & Families II (U2 level)- Co-teacher (TA) with Tamara Sussman, School of Social Work, McGill University.

Winter 2016: - SWRK-326 Practice with Individuals & Families II (U2 level)- Co-teacher (TA) with Tamara Sussman, School of Social Work, McGill University.

Fall 2014-SWRK-609 Understanding Social Care (Master’s level)- Co-teacher with Victoria Burns, School of Social Work, McGill University.

Contact Information

susan.mintzberg [at] mail.mcgill.ca


Lyn Morland

Bio

I've devoted 35 years to developing culturally responsive social services, education, and health/mental health care, nationally and internationally, with an emphasis on community participation and leadership. My work has included research (ethnic identity, international development, community service collaboration, health care, and community-based participatory research); directing community-based programs; and developing and leading national technical assistance initiatives (National Alliance for Multicultural Mental Health and, for the past 10 years, Bridging Refugee Youth & Children's Services, www.brycs.org). I hold an MSW and MA/doctoral candidacy in Anthropology/Medical Behavioral Sciences. I am currently a Research Fellow at Bank Street College of Education in New York and a doctoral student and Tomlinson Fellow in the School of Social Work at McGill University. My current research focuses on cross-sector collaboration and community partnership strategies to improve cultural responsiveness, relevance, and effectiveness within mainstream education, health/mental health, and social service systems.

Research

Indigenous Migrant Family Participatory Action Research Project (2013-2015):  Co-developer and lead writer for collaborative project conducted together with the Office of Head Start National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness and the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) Collaboration Office.  Developed relationships with indigenous and MSHS organizations in Oxnard, California and Tampa, Florida and worked closely with all partners to conduct multiple site visits, key informant interviews, focus groups, and qualitative data analysis.  Highly collaborative process resulted in development of the first culturally responsive materials for Mixtec, Zapotec, and Triqui families from Mexico on early learning and healthy development and for North American practitioners on these indigenous peoples.

Head Start-Refugee Resettlement Collaboration Research (2011-2015):  Co-developer and lead writer for mixed-methods study of collaboration between Head Start and Refugee Resettlement at the federal, regional, state, and local levels (Phoenix, Arizona and Syracuse, New York) conducted together with Nicole Ives, McGill University, and Clea McNeely and Chenoa Allen, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.  Invited to participate in two roundtables organized by Migration Policy Institute (MPI) on young children in refugee families. First author for MPI-commissioned research article on our study.

Publications

Morland, L., Ives, N., McNeely, C. and Allen, C. (2016). Providing a Head Start: Improving Access to Early Childhood Education for Refugees. Washington, DC: Migration Policy Institute.

Morland, L. and Birman, D. (2016). Practice with immigrant and refugee children and families in the education system. In A. Dettlaff & R. Fong (Eds), Immigrant and Refugee Children and Families: Culturally Responsive Practice. New York: Columbia University Press.

McNeely, C., Morland, L., Doty, B., Meschke, L., and Husain, A. (2016).  How schools can promote healthy transitions to adulthood for newly-arrived immigrant and refugee adolescents: Research priorities. Journal of School Health.  

Morland, L. and Levine, T. (2016). Collaborating with refugee resettlement organizations: Providing a head start to young refugees. Young Children,17(4):69-75.

McNeely, C. and Morland, L. (2016). McNeely and Morland Respond. American Journal of Public Health, 106(5):e19-e19.

McNeely, C. and Morland, L. (2016). The health of the newest Americans: How public health systems can support Syrian refugees. American Journal of Public Health, 106(1):13-15.

Morland, L. (2014). Kinship care and immigrant families. FOCUS. NJ: Foster Family-based Treatment Association.

Dettlaff, A., Morland, L., and Lincroft, Y. (2014). Special Issue on Migration and Child Welfare: An Introduction. FOCUS. NJ: Foster Family-based Treatment Association.

Birman, D. and Morland, L. (2013). Immigrant youth. In D. Dubois & M. Karcher (Eds), Handbook of Youth Mentoring, Second Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Morland, L., Birman, D., Dunn, B., Adkins, M., and Gardner, L. (2013). Immigrant students. In E. Rossen & R. Hull (Eds), Supporting and Educating Traumatized Students. New York: Oxford University Press.

Fontes, L. and Morland, L. (2009, expanded in 2012-2013).  Preventing Child Maltreatment in ORR-Funded Care Provider Programs.  Washington, DC: BRYCS/USCCB and ORR.

Morland, L., Lummert, N. and Earner, I. (2006).  Brighter Futures for Migrating Children: An Overview of Current Trends and Promising Practices in Child Welfare. Washington, D.C.: Bridging Refugee Youth & Children’s Services/USCCB. 

Morland, L. (2007).  Promising practices in positive youth development with immigrants and refugees. The Prevention Researcher, 14(4):18-20.

Morland, L., Duncan, J. Hoebing, J., Kirschke, J., and Schmidt, L. (2005).  Bridging Refugee Youth & Children’s Services: Lessons learned from a national technical assistance effort. The Journal of Child Welfare, 84(5):791-812.

Hunt, D., Morland, L., Huckins, M., and Caal, S. (2002). Understanding, Preventing, and Treating Problem Behaviors among Refugee and Immigrant Youth. (a comprehensive annotated bibliography with 48-page narrative prepared for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; narrative available on-line, http://www.brycs.org/documents/upload/CMHS_publication.pdf).

Pellegrino, E., Harvey, J., Morland, L., Wessell, M. and Curtin, T. (1991).  Opening doors to the needy. Health Progress. Washington, DC: The Catholic Health Association of the United States (an article describing organizing a network of volunteer physicians to serve the medically uninsured, primarily Central American immigrants).

Professional Publications:

National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness, OHS/NCCLR (2015). Using participatory methods, co-developed resources to promote culturally responsive practice with refugee and indigenous migrant (lead writer) (http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/cultural-linguistic/refugee...).

Bridging Refugee Youth and Children’s Services, BRYCS/USCCB (2004-2013). Led, researched, developed topics/conceptual approach, and authored or co-authored over 200 original BRYCS articles and resources on refugee and immigrant children, youth, and families (www.brycs.org/publications/index.cfm).

National Alliance for Multicultural Mental Health, Immigration and Refugee Services of America/U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, IRSA/USCRI (1998-2000). Led and co-developed: Lessons from the Field: Issues and Resources in Refugee Mental Health
Connections: An On-Line Publication of IRSA’s National Alliance for Multicultural Mental Health.

Contact Information

Lyn.Morland [at] mail.McGill.ca (Email)


Megan Simpson

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