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Graduate programs

The Faculty of Science offers programs leading to an M.Sc. or Ph.D. in a wide range of disciplines.

Faculty of Science programs

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Location

  • Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
  • Burnside Hall
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 945
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3764
  • Fax: 514-398-6115
  • Email: info.aos [at] mcgill.ca; graduate studies: graduateinfo.aos [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/meteo

About Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

The Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences offers courses and research opportunities in atmospheric sciences and physical oceanography leading to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. Research programs borrow from fundamental fields such as mathematics, statistics, physics, chemistry, and computing to address a broad range of topics relating to weather and climate. Examples include:

  • atmospheric chemistry;
  • climate dynamics;
  • cloud and precipitation physics;
  • dynamical oceanography and meteorology;
  • geophysical turbulence;
  • numerical modelling;
  • numerical weather prediction;
  • ocean carbon budgets;
  • sea ice dynamics;
  • synoptic and mesoscale meteorology;
  • remote sensing of weather and climate.

Some faculty members have close ties with other departments, schools, and centres, including the Chemistry, and Mathematics and Statistics Departments; the McGill School of Environment; ArcticNet; and Quebec Ocean. Facilities include the McGill Atmospheric Profiling Observatory, as well as state-of-the-art field and laboratory equipment for atmospheric chemistry. Graduate students have access to computers, ranging from desktop PCs to the massive parallel machines available to us through Compute Canada. In some cases, M.Sc. and Ph.D. research may include a field component. Most students also participate in national and international conferences.

Financial assistance in the form of research stipends and teaching assistantships is available for all qualified graduate students.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (Thesis) (45 credits)

Our program applies mathematics, physics, computing, and sometimes chemistry to study the atmosphere and/or oceans. The ideal student would therefore have a strong quantitative background in one or more of these fields. Although some of our students have undergraduate knowledge of meteorology or physical oceanography, such background is not necessary to succeed in the program. McGill offers the only program in Canada that includes both atmospheric and oceanic sciences. Students benefit from a large professor-to-student ratio and access to state-of-the-art computing, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry laboratory equipment. The Department also has close ties with Environment & Climate Change Canada's numerical weather prediction centre in Dorval, Quebec.

Most of our incoming M.Sc. students choose this (default) option. It allows considerable flexibility as to the choice of research topics, and gives students both a strong classroom knowledge of the subject as well as the opportunity to choose from a variety of thesis research projects. Students who do not choose to continue in academia find employment in a variety of areas and places; for example, working with Environment & Climate Change Canada as research associates or weather forecasters.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (Thesis): Environment (45 credits)

This program is currently not offered.

The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking.

Students following the Environment option must first be accepted by the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, and then by the McGill School of Environment (MSE) before an offer of admission will be made by the University. Environment option students require either a single supervisor with a joint appointment in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and the MSE, or co-supervisors, one each in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and the MSE.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Our program applies mathematics, physics, computing, and sometimes chemistry to study the atmosphere and/or oceans. The ideal student would therefore have a strong quantitative background in one or more of these fields. Although some of our students have undergraduate knowledge of meteorology or physical oceanography, such background is not necessary to succeed in the program. McGill offers the only program in Canada that includes both atmospheric and oceanic sciences. Students benefit from a large professor-to-student ratio and access to state-of-the-art computing, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry laboratory equipment. The Department also has close ties with Environment & Climate Change Canada's numerical weather prediction centre in Dorval, Quebec. Students who do not choose to continue in academia find employment in a variety of areas including research careers at government labs such as Environment & Climate Change Canada.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 16, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Biology

Biology

Location

  • Department of Biology
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room N7/18B
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-5478
  • Fax: 514-398-5069
  • Email: ancil.gittens [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: biology.mcgill.ca

About Biology

The Department offers graduate training in many areas of biology with particular strengths in the following areas:
  • Molecular Biology and Genetics
  • Cell and Developmental Biology
  • Ecology, Biodiversity, and Conservation
  • Evolution
  • Neurobiology
  • Bioinformatics
  • Plant Biology
In addition to the regular M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs, the Biology Department offers specialized programs, known as “concentrations”, in the areas of Neotropical Environment (NEO), Bioinformatics, and Environment.

Both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. are research-intensive degrees, and the emphasis in both programs is on developing the intellectual and technical skills necessary for independent research. The main component of both degrees is a thesis presenting the results of this work in the form of a student’s original contribution to scientific knowledge. Formal coursework, usually in the form of literature-based seminar courses, is minimal and typically completed within the first year. To complement their classroom and laboratory training, students regularly attend other seminar series and journal clubs and present their own work annually in a formal seminar.

In addition to working with world-class researchers, graduate students in Biology have access to top-notch research infrastructure. The Stewart Biology Building and the Bellini Life Sciences Complex are equipped with state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for sophisticated imaging, robotic, and genetic techniques, to name a few. These in-house capabilities are complemented by a wide range of field research facilities, which include:

These resources are also extended by affiliation with other organizations such as the Redpath Museum, the National Research Council of Canada, the Groupe Interuniversitaire de Recherches Océanographiques du Québec (GIROQ), the McGill Macdonald campus, the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the Jewish General Hospital, the Montreal General Hospital, the Montreal Children's Hospital, and the Glen site.

The Department specifies a minimum level of support for all graduate students. This amount is $15,900 per annum plus tuition fees. The required minimum duration of support is two years for the M.Sc. program, five years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 1 (directly from a bachelor's degree), and four years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 2 (after having completed a master's degree).

The graduate program of each student is established and regularly evaluated by a three-member supervisory committee appointed by the Graduate Training Committee and chaired by the student’s thesis supervisor.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Biology (Thesis) (45 credits)

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.).

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, pursuing careers as wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Biology (Thesis): Bioinformatics (48 credits)

The goal of the Bioinformatics concentration is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. The Bioinformatics graduate concentration consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics concentration. Students in this concentration will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics concentration. At the M.Sc. level, students successfully completing the Bioinformatics concentration will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Biology (Thesis): Environment (48 credits)

The Environment graduate concentration offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this concentration adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment concentration will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences. Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment concentration is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of disciplines.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Biology (Thesis): Neotropical Environment (48 credits)

The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based concentration for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, including both Latin American and Canadian students, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is also required. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Biology

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.).

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, pursuing careers as wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Biology: Bioinformatics

The goal of the Bioinformatics concentration is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

The Bioinformatics graduate concentration consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics concentration. Students in this concentration will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics concentration. At the Ph.D. level students will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will also have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Biology: Environment

The Environment graduate concentration offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this concentration adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment concentration will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences.

Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment concentration is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of different disciplines. This concentration is available from a variety of faculties and departments.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Biology: Neotropical Environment

The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based concentration for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, originating from Canada, Latin America, and abroad, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program.

NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 16, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs in Biology

Chemistry

Chemistry

Location

  • Department of Chemistry
  • Otto Maass Chemistry Building
  • 801 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6999
  • Fax: 514-398-3797
  • Email: graduate.chemistry [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/chemistry

About Chemistry

Research in Chemistry

Members of the Department are organized into various research themes. Some of the current research interests are listed below, and are presented in much more detail on the Departmental website.

Analytical/Environmental

The Analytical/Environmental Thematic Research Group at McGill is involved in a wide range of exciting fundamental and applied research with focus on: state-of-the-art instrumental development in spectroscopy; imaging; chemometric and analytical bio-spectroscopy; artificial intelligence; ultra trace sampling; thermochemical, box, and cloud modelling; and state-of-the-art atmospheric kinetics and photochemistry; as well as the development and application of state-of-the-art numerical models of the chemistry of the regional and global atmosphere. Our collective research has direct implications in fields such as materials, environmental, and biomedical chemistry.

Chemical Biology

The Chemical Biology Thematic Research Group is engaged in a diverse range of research topics, which span structural biology, enzymology, nucleic acid research, signalling pathways, single-molecule biophysics, and biophysical chemistry of living tissues. Among the themes that unite the research being performed in this group is the attempt to learn new chemistry and physics from biological systems.

We have projects relating to pharmaceutically relevant enzymes such as those involved in drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance; development of therapeutic agents in the control of inflammation, cancer and viral infections; the chemical biology of NO; quantification of bioenergetic markers of metabolism; self-assembly mechanisms of the HIV-1 virion capsid; liposome microarray systems to address membrane protein dynamics and recognition; studies on reactive oxygen species translocation across the aqueous/lipid membrane interface; RNAi/antisense technologies; dynamic combinatorial chemistry; protein dynamics and function; mechanistic aspects involved in cellular adhesion and transport in membrane and zeolite channels; and cutting-edge microscopes used to examine transport, motility, and reactivity in cells.

Chemical Physics

The research interests of the members of the Chemical Physics Thematic Research Group are diverse, with groups focusing on high-end laser and NMR spectroscopies, kinetics and modelling of atmospheric chemical reactions, experimental and theoretical biophysical chemistry, polymers at interfaces, and statistical and quantum mechanics. In the field of biophysical chemistry, single molecule spectroscopy is being used to probe enzyme function as well as DNA recombination and repair. Our recent advances in image correlation spectroscopic techniques now allow researchers to precisely follow the macromolecular dynamics in living cells. In a similar vein, breakthrough ultra-fast electron diffraction experiments have opened the window to real-time observation of the making and breaking of chemical bonds. State-of-the-art multi-pulse femtosecond spectroscopy experiments are being applied to interesting and technologically important new materials such as photonic crystals and quantum dot superlattices. A molecular-level picture of polymer dynamics and structure at surfaces and interfaces is being developed through theoretical modelling, high-field solids NMR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and other surface characterization methods. In the area of atmospheric chemistry, the chemical transformation of the atmosphere is being modelled both experimentally and theoretically to understand how these processes are currently affecting and driving climate change. Finally, we have basic theory projects relating to the experimental work just described, as well as in transport and structure in complex colloidal or zeolite systems, protein dynamics, and fundamental issues in quantum and statistical mechanics.

Materials Chemistry

The chemistry of materials is a rapidly evolving domain of research. Materials chemistry seeks to understand how composition, reactivity, and structure are related to function from a molecular perspective. The functionality of materials is expressed in a variety of areas including photonics, micro- and nano-electronics, biosystems, nanotechnology, drug delivery, catalysis, polymer science, molecular biology, and chemical and biological sensing. Activities of the Materials Chemistry Thematic Research Group are often broadly interdisciplinary. University-wide synergies among members of this group have led to the creation of the McGill Institute for Advanced Materials (MIAM) and the McGill Nanotools Facility. The latter comprises state-of-the-art micro/nanofabrication, atomic manipulation and high-performance computing facilities. MIAM and members of the Chemistry Department have established research links to the Quebec Centre for Advanced Materials, the Centre for Biorecognition and Biosensors, the Centre for the Physics of Materials, and the Centre for Bone and Periodontal Research. Synthetic approaches to new materials include research in dendrimers, polynucleic acid architectures, polymers that conduct electrons or light and biopolymers. Polymer and colloid science figure prominently as does research and applications of the chemistry and physical properties of nanostructures. There is significant activity in understanding directed molecular assembly at interfaces and in the application of sophisticated spectroscopic tools to explore them.

Synthesis/Catalysis

The Synthesis/Catalysis Research Activity Group is a collective that develops state-of-art catalysts, synthetic methodologies, reaction mechanisms, and synthetic routes for organic chemicals, natural products, and materials. The collective's major research activities at McGill include: (1) Development of novel catalysts and catalytic reactions for highly efficient organic synthesis; Green Chemistry. This includes the study and discovery of novel transition-metal catalysts, biological catalysts, nano- and dendrimer-based catalysts for synthetic purposes; new chemical reactivity such as C-H activation, asymmetric catalysis and theory, multi-component reactions and combinatorial chemistry; innovative chemistry in alternative solvents such as water, sub-critical water, ionic liquids, and liquid CO2; photocatalytic reactions, reaction mechanisms, and physical organic chemistry; and computational chemistry. (2) Synthesis of biological compounds, organic materials, and natural products. Focus areas are total synthesis of natural products, synthesis of DNA and RNA analogues; synthesis of antiviral and anticancer nucleoside analogues, synthesis of amino acid and peptides; synthesis and study of carbohydrate derivatives; design, synthesis, and study of specialty organic chemical and materials.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Chemistry (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please consult the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Chemistry
Please consult the Department for more information about this program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 16, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs in Chemistry

Computer Science

Computer Science

Location

  • School of Computer Science
  • McConnell Engineering, Room 318
  • 3480 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0E9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7071, ext. 00074
  • Fax: 514-398-3883
  • Email: grad.cs [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: www.cs.mcgill.ca

About Computer Science

The School of Computer Science is one of the leading teaching and research centres for computer science in Canada. We offer several M.Sc. programs and a Ph.D. program; all include coursework and research. In the basic M.Sc. programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option, which requires a project. The Ph.D. and M.Sc. programs both include an option in bioinformatics. Students are normally funded by their adviser's research grants; in the case of scholarship students, this typically takes the form of a 'top-up' to the scholarship. Research in the School covers a broad range of areas, including:

  • Theory: algorithms, combinatorial optimization, computational geometry, cryptography, graph theory, logic and computation, programming languages, quantum computing, theory of computation, and scientific computing;
  • Systems: compilers, computer games, distributed systems, embedded and real-time systems, modelling and simulations, networks, and software engineering;
  • Applications: bioinformatics, machine learning, robotics, computer animation, graphics, and vision.

All students must consult the graduate program website, where up-to-date information about the graduate programs is posted. Any questions concerning programs should be addressed to the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Computer Science (Thesis) (45 credits)

This program is designed for students with a strong interest in research in computer science who hold at least the equivalent of an undergraduate minor in CS. This program combines a strong course component with a research thesis. It is the usual (but not mandatory) entry point for students who wish to do a Ph.D., but is also the program of choice for students who want to find challenging and exciting jobs after their master's.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Computer Science (Thesis): Bioinformatics (45 credits)

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Computer Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This program is designed for students who want to obtain broad knowledge of advanced topics in computer science but without the requirement of a thesis. It offers an excellent preparation for the job market, but is not recommended for students interested in eventually pursuing a Ph.D.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Computer Science

The Ph.D. program trains students to become strong, independent researchers in the field of their choice. Our graduates take challenging positions in industry or take academic positions at universities and research labs. In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, applicants should normally hold a master's degree in Computer Science or a closely related area, from a well-recognized university, but exceptional students can be admitted to the Ph.D. program directly without a master's degree.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Computer Science: Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 16, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs in Computer Science

Earth and Planetary Sciences

Earth and Planetary Sciences

Location

  • Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
  • Frank Dawson Adams Building
  • 3450 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0E8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6767
  • Fax: 514-398-4680
  • Email: grad.eps [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/eps

About Earth and Planetary Sciences

The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences offers both M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree programs. Graduate programs are based on research, although some courses are required to build the backgrounds of students. Research in the Department is wide-ranging, and includes:

  • studies of the geochemistry of the mantle;
  • the nature of processes concentrating metals in hydrothermal mineral deposits;
  • experimental studies of the controls of viscosity in magmas and the mechanisms of volcanic eruption;
  • the fate of carbon and trace metals in marine sediments;
  • the nature of changes in atmospheric and oceanic chemistry during Earth’s history;
  • mechanisms of faulting;
  • geomicrobiology
  • wetland hydrogeology;
  • interactions between the cryosphere, solid Earth, and climate systems;
  • planetary-scale ocean biogeochemistry (e.g., ocean acidification) and its relationship to global warming.

There is a very substantial interdisciplinary basis to much of the research.

Facilities in the Department include low-temperature and pressure to high-temperature and pressure experimental laboratories, a stable-isotope mass spectrometer, laser-ablation ICP-MS, and electron microprobe, as well as atomic absorption spectrometers. Our students also make substantial use of other facilities at McGill and at nearby Université du Québec à Montréal.

Financial assistance is available in the form of teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and scholarships.

Areas of Research:

Aquatic Geochemistry

Application of chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, and surface chemistry to the characterization of mineral-solution interactions in aquatic environments; carbonate geochemistry; early diagenesis of marine and coastal sediments; trace metal and environmental geochemistry in freshwater and marine systems.

Biogeochemistry

Response of the marine ecosystem to climate change and anthropogenic stresses through observations of the modern ocean, and experimental and numerical simulations of ocean biogeochemistry. Reconstructions of past climate change using sediments from lacustrine, coastal, and marine sediments. The processes controlling carbon cycling in freshwater environments, including the burial of organic matter in sediments and the production of greenhouse gases through microbial respiration. Development of new isotopic methods for tracing carbon-cycle and hydrological change in the past and present. Investigating the dynamical relationships that link climate, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystems and humans using a combination of large datasets, simple theory and numerical Earth system models to identify novel processes and quantitative relationships.

Economic Geology

Studies of the genesis of hydrothermal mineral deposits through a combination of field-based, experimental, and theoretical methods. Research focuses on the understanding of physico-chemical controls of mineralization, through geological mapping of deposits; experimental studies of metal solubility and speciation in hydrothermal systems; simulations of hydrothermal alteration; and theoretical studies designed to estimate conditions of alteration and ore formation. Trace-element chemistry of minerals as quantitative probes of the compositions of ore-forming fluids.

Geobiology

Understanding the role of microorganisms in biogeochemical cycles; cultivation of environmental microorganisms; applying molecular and isotopic tools to characterize microbial activity in present and past environments.

Geophysics and Climate

Applying physics to study the interactions between the solid Earth, ice, ocean, and climate systems; numerical modelling, analysis, and interpretation of paleo and modern sea-level changes, solid earth deformation and glacial isostatic adjustment, and ice in the Earth and climate systems.

Hydrogeology

Studies of pore-water flow in northern peatlands; heat transport; heat as a tracer of natural systems; groundwater modelling; coupled numerical models of pore water flow and heat transport with freeze/thaw processes; and the impact of melting tropical glaciers on water resources.

Igneous Petrology

Experimental studies of the structure, thermodynamics, and transport properties (diffusion and viscosity) of silicate melts and applications to igneous petrogenesis. The nature of the Earth's upper mantle and the processes within it which give rise to basaltic volcanism on both the Earth and the other terrestrial planets. Applications of laser ablation ICPMS; petrology, geochemistry, and tectonics of the Appalachian lithosphere.

Isotopic Geochemistry and Sedimentary Geology

Sedimentology, stratigraphy, and isotope geochemistry as guides to reconstructing ancient environments. Reconstruction of Proterozoic paleogeographies and the origin and evolution of Proterozoic sedimentary basins. Documenting and interpreting paleoenvironmental change during the Proterozoic. Relationships between tectonics (i.e., supercontinental break-up and assembly), seawater chemistry and ocean redox, and climate change. Calibrating the diversification of early eukaryotes and their impact on global biogeochemical cycles.

Mineralogy

Chemistry and crystallography of carbonate and a variety of rock-forming and biogenic minerals; experimental investigations of the effect of environmental factors (e.g., solution composition and temperature) on the morphology and composition of carbonate and phosphate minerals.

Seismology

Subduction earthquake nucleation and rupture propagation processes; physical mechanism of aseismic deformation transients, deep non-volcanic tremors, dynamic and static stress triggering of low-frequency earthquakes and transients; pore-fluid pressure coupling with frictional strength and slip.

Tectonics and Structural Geology

Digital field mapping, microstructural characterization, and mineralogical analyses of deformation structure kinematics, geometry, and deformation processes; archean orogenic processes; structural controls on ore deposit genesis; fluid flow in faults, granular flow in faults, and catastrophic structural/geochemical events in faults; earthquake mechanics and processes recorded in rocks; brittle-ductile transition structures and rheology.

Volcanology

Petrology and geochemistry of intermediate and felsic magmas; understanding physical processes and forecasting eruptions at active subduction-zone volcanoes; geochemistry of volcanic gases, their use for eruption prediction, and their impact on the atmosphere.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Earth and Planetary Sciences (Thesis) (45 credits)

The nature of graduate research in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences is highly variable. As a result, students may enter the graduate program with backgrounds in earth sciences, chemistry, or physics, depending on their research interests and the supervisor with whom they wish to work. Students pursuing an M.Sc. are required to take four courses, but their major project is an M.Sc. thesis that typically results in a journal publication. Research for the thesis typically begins in the first year of residence and is completed, together with the written results, in the second year of residence.

Students graduating from the program typically proceed to a Ph.D. or work in the mineral exploration or petroleum industries. Excellent students admitted into the M.Sc. program can be “fast-tracked” from the M.Sc. into the Ph.D. program at the end of the first year if suitable progress has been demonstrated. Such students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits of coursework in total, and a comprehensive oral examination before the end of 18 months in the Ph.D. program.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Earth and Planetary Sciences (Thesis): Environment (48 credits)

The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students that have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Earth and Planetary Sciences

The nature of graduate research in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences is highly variable. As a result, students may enter the graduate program with backgrounds in earth sciences, chemistry, or physics, depending on their research interests and the supervisor with whom they wish to work. Ph.D. students typically enter with an M.Sc., in which case they are required by our regulations to take only two courses, although a supervisor may require more, depending on the suitability of the student’s background. In addition to courses, Ph.D. students commence work on the thesis research project, including preparation for an oral examination on their research proposal before the end of 18 months from starting the program. Conduct of the research, and preparation of the results, for thesis and publication, typically takes three additional years. Students entering the Ph.D. program without an M.Sc. are required to take a full year of courses before embarking on the processes described above.

Students graduating from our Ph.D. program pursue careers in universities and government-funded research institutes, and in the mineral-exploration and petroleum industries.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Earth and Planetary Sciences: Environment

The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students that have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 16, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs in Earth and Planetary Sciences

Geography

Geography

Location

  • Department of Geography
  • Burnside Hall
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 705
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4111
  • Fax: 514-398-7437
  • Email: grad.geog [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/geography

About Geography

The Department of Geography offers research and thesis-based graduate programs leading to a Master of Arts (M.A.), a Master of Science (M.Sc.), or a doctorate (Ph.D.). In its scope, our program includes the opportunity to conduct field-based studies in both the natural (i.e., biophysical) and the social sciences. Thematic areas of study include:

  • Political, Urban, Economic, and Health Geography;
  • Environment and Development;
  • Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing;
  • Land Surface Processes, Ecosystem Biogeochemistry, and Ecohydrology;
  • Earth System Science and Global Change;
  • Sustainability Science and Environmental Management.

Geography houses McGill's Hitschfield Geographic Information Centre, maintains the McGill Arctic Research Station (Axel Heiburg Island, Nunavut Territory) and the McGill Sub-Arctic Research Station (Schefferville, Quebec), and has strong ties with McGill’s School of Environment. Faculty and students conduct research in fields as diverse as climate change impacts, periglacial geomorphology, and forest resource history in regions ranging from the Arctic to Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Being both a natural and a social science, geography provides a unique opportunity to obtain a broad interdisciplinary exposure to modes of analyzing the many environmental and situational problems of contemporary society. Because of this, a geography degree is a fantastic opportunity to obtain a career in one of a diverse range of fields. Our students have gone on to become United Nations field researchers in Laos, environmental consultants in Toronto, science teachers in the U.S., geography professors in many parts of the world, UNHCR volunteers in Malaysia, policy analysts, and physical scientists in government agencies and research councils, as well as health and social policy researchers in Montreal…the list goes on! If you're on Facebook, look for McGill Geography Alumni or visit our website to learn more about the advantages of having a geography degree from McGill!

Master’s degrees in both the physical (M.Sc.) and social (M.A.) sciences are offered by Geography. The core of both programs for all students is field-based research supervised by a faculty member, culminating in a thesis. The core program consists of the thesis component, required, and complementary graduate (500- or 600-level) courses.

Geography also offers in association with other McGill departments and programs a number of M.A. and M.Sc. options that students may choose to follow. Students must pass the courses specified for their program, attend such additional courses as the Chair and the student's thesis supervisor see fit, and submit a thesis in an appropriate area of geographical inquiry approved by the adviser.

McGill Northern Research Stations

The McGill Sub-Arctic Research Station is located in Schefferville, in the centre of Quebec-Labrador. Facilities exist for research in most areas of physical and some areas of human geography in the subarctic.

McGill University also operates a field station at Expedition Fiord on Axel Heiberg Island in the High Arctic. Facilities are limited to a small lab, dorm building, and cookhouse. Research activities focus on the glacial and geological. For additional information on these stations, contact the Scientific Director, Wayne Pollard, Department of Geography, at wayne.pollard [at] mcgill.ca.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Programs in Geography

Detailed program requirements for the following M.A. programs are found in Arts > Graduate > Browse Academic Units & Programs > Geography.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Geography (Thesis) (45 credits)

Master’s degrees in both the physical (M.Sc.) and social (M.A.) sciences are offered by Geography. The core of both programs for all students is field-based research, supervised by a faculty member, culminating in a thesis. The core program consists of the thesis component, required, and complementary graduate (500- or 600-level) courses. Geography also offers a number of M.A. and M.Sc. options in association with other McGill departments and programs that students may choose to follow.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Geography (Thesis): Development Studies (45 credits)

The Development Studies Option (DSO) is cross-disciplinary in scope within existing master’s programs in Geography, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Economics, and Sociology. Its components include the thesis; required International Development and Geography courses; and complementary courses from the participating departments. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Geography (Thesis): Environment (45 credits)

The Environment option is offered in association with the McGill School of Environment (MSE) and is composed of a thesis component, required, and complementary Geography and Environment courses. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. Students who have been admitted through their home department or Faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the MSE, in partnership with participating academic units.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Geography (Thesis): Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

This is an interdisciplinary program for Geography students wishing to focus on gender and women’s studies and issues in feminist research and methods. Included within it are a thesis on gender and women’s studies, required, and complementary courses from Geography and Women’s Studies.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Geography (Thesis): Neotropical Environment (45 credits)

The McGill-STRI Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based option for master's or Ph.D. students offered in association with several University departments, the McGill School of Environment, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI-Panama). The option includes a thesis; required courses in Geography, Environment, and Biology; and complementary courses chosen from Geography, Agriculture Sciences, Biology, Sociology, Environment, and Political Science. NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America and NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. NEO's educational approach seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Programs in Geography

Detailed program requirements for the following M.Sc. programs are found in Science > Graduate > Browse Academic Units & Programs > Geography.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Geography (Thesis) (45 credits)

Master’s degrees in both the physical (M.Sc.) and social (M.A.) sciences are offered by Geography. The core of both programs for all students is field-based research, supervised by a faculty member, culminating in a thesis. The core program consists of the thesis component, required, and complementary graduate (500- or 600-level) courses. Geography also offers a number of M.A. and M.Sc. options in association with other McGill departments and programs that students may choose to follow.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Geography (Thesis): Environment (45 credits)

The Environment option is offered in association with the McGill School of Environment (MSE) and is composed of a thesis component; required Geography and Environment courses; and complementary Geography and Environment courses. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. Students who have been admitted through their home department or Faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the MSE, in partnership with participating academic units.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Geography (Thesis): Neotropical Environment (45 credits)

The McGill-STRI Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based option for master's students offered in association with several university departments, the McGill School of Environment, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI-Panama). The option includes a thesis; required courses in Geography, Environment, and Biology; and complementary courses chosen from Geography, Agriculture Sciences, Biology, Sociology, Environment, and Political Science. NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America and NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. NEO's educational approach seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Ph.D. Programs in Geography

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Geography

The doctoral degree in Geography includes the successful completion of the comprehensive examination, a thesis based on original research, and coursework chosen in collaboration with the student’s supervisor and/or research committee. The main elements of the Ph.D. are the thesis and comprehensive examination, a required Methods of Geographical Research course, and a minimum of two complementary courses.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Geography: Environment

The Environment option consists of the thesis and comprehensive examination; required courses from Geography and Environment; and complementary courses in Environment or other fields recommended by the research committee and approved by the Environment Option Committee. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment, in partnership with participating academic units.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Geography: Gender and Women's Studies

This doctoral option is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Geography and who wish to earn 9 credits of approved coursework on gender and women’s studies and issues in feminist research and methods. It includes a thesis centrally related to gender and/or women’s studies; the comprehensive examination; required courses in Geography and Women’s Studies; and complementary courses, one of which must pertain to gender and/or women’s issues.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Geography: Neotropical Environment

The McGill-STRI Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based option for Ph.D. students offered in association with several university departments, the McGill School of Environment, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI-Panama) and includes the thesis; comprehensive examination; required courses in Geography, Environment, and Biology; and complementary courses chosen from Geography, Agriculture Sciences, Biology, Sociology, Environment, and Political Science. NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America and NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. NEO's educational approach seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 16, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs in Geography

Mathematics and Statistics

Mathematics and Statistics

Location

  • Department of Mathematics and Statistics
  • Burnside Hall, Room 1005
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3800
  • Fax: 514-398-3899
  • Email: grad.mathstat [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/mathstat/

About Mathematics and Statistics

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs that can be focused on applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to master’s degrees (M.A. or M.Sc.), with program options in Bioinformatics. The research groups are:

  • Algebra;
  • Algebraic Geometry;
  • Analysis;
  • Applied Mathematics;
  • Differential Equations;
  • Differential Geometry;
  • Discrete Mathematics;
  • Geometric Group Theory;
  • Logic;
  • Mathematical Biology;
  • Mathematical Physics;
  • Number Theory;
  • Probability;
  • Statistics.

In the basic master’s programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option which requires a project. The Bioinformatics option requires a thesis. In addition to the Ph.D. program in Mathematics and Statistics, there is a Ph.D. option in Bioinformatics.

The Department's website provides extensive information on the Department and its facilities, including the research activities and research interests of individual faculty members. It also provides detailed supplementary information concerning our programs, admissions, funding of graduate students, thesis requirements, advice concerning the choice of courses, etc.

Students are urged to consult the Institut des Sciences Mathématiques (ISM) website, which coordinates intermediate and advanced-level graduate courses among Montreal and Quebec universities. A list of courses available under the ISM auspices can be obtained from the ISM website. The ISM also offers fellowships and promotes a variety of joint academic activities greatly enhancing the mathematical environment in Montreal and in the province of Quebec.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.A. programs are found in Arts > Graduate > Browse Academic Units & Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.A.). The thesis option requires a thesis and six approved courses.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.A.). The non-thesis option requires a project and eight approved courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.Sc. programs are found in Science > Graduate > Browse Academic Units & Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.). The thesis option requires a thesis and six approved courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis): Bioinformatics (48 credits)

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.).The non-thesis option requires a project and eight approved courses.

Ph.D. Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Mathematics and Statistics

The Department offers a course of studies leading to the Ph.D. degree. It differs substantially from the master’s programs in that the student must write a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge. The thesis topic is chosen by the student in consultation with the research supervisor. The thesis must be examined and approved by an internal examiner (normally the research supervisor), an external examiner, and the Oral Examination Committee. The student must present an oral defence of the thesis before that Committee. To submit a thesis for examination, the student must first pass comprehensive examinations.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Mathematics and Statistics: Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 16, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Physics

Physics

Location

  • Department of Physics
  • Ernest Rutherford Physics Building
  • 3600 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6485 (Graduate Information)
  • Fax: 514-398-8434
  • Email: graduate.physics [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: www.physics.mcgill.ca

About Physics

The Department of Physics currently has a faculty of approximately 40 members, including several holders of Canada Research Chairs and many other prestigious named Chairs. Additionally, we host an impressive number of postdoctoral fellows and research associates and run one of the largest and most vibrant graduate programs in North America. The graduate student enrolment is currently approximately 200.

Faculty members in the Department of Physics are recognized internationally for their excellence. Our members have received national and international prizes and fellowships including Les Prix Du Québec, Steacie Prize, Sloan Fellowships, NSERC, and many others. They are also in constant demand as reviewers and referees. Students who earn advanced degrees from the Department of Physics will not only get an excellent education, they will also receive valuable guidance and network contacts to help with subsequent career steps.

The Department offers full M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree programs in a wide range of disciplines, including:

  • astrophysics;
  • atmospheric physics;
  • bio-physics;
  • condensed-matter physics;
  • high-energy physics;
  • laser spectroscopy;
  • material physics;
  • non-linear dynamics and atmospheric physics;
  • nuclear physics;
  • statistical physics;
  • medical-radiation physics.

Although most of the teaching and research facilities are located in the Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, the Department has space and research facilities in the Wong Materials Science Centre, adjacent to the Rutherford Building. Our groups also conduct research at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Jewish General Hospital, the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) and laboratories around the world, including Argonne, CERN, FermiLab, SLAC, TRIUMF, and KEK.

Departmental researchers enjoy technical support in the areas of engineering, electronics, and precision machining. The Department maintains an excellent conventional machine shop as well as the McGill Nanotools-Microfab facility. Most of the scientific computing is done with an extensive in-house network of powerful workstations and several Beowulf clusters.

Remote access to supercomputing sites in Canada and the United States is also possible including the McGill HPC super-computing facility which is a part of the nationwide network of high performance computing installations in Quebec.

The Department of Physics offers a competitive funding package for both local and international students. For more information about financial support, please www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/finance.html.

Graduate students in the Department of Physics come from many different countries and cultural backgrounds, providing a stimulating cosmopolitan atmosphere in the Department. This, coupled with the unique opportunities afforded by the city of Montreal, guarantees a quality of life that is second to none among Canadian universities. For graduate admission and application information, please visit www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/application.html.

Fields of Research:

High-Energy Physics

Theoretical: The McGill high energy theorists have interests in a wide range of areas within quantum field theory, string theory, quantum gravity, and cosmology. Research areas of the high-energy theory faculty include applications of quantum field theory techniques to relativistic heavy ion collisions, baryogenesis, superstring cosmology, theory of cosmological perturbations, black hole physics, supergravity, three dimensional gravity, and various topics related to the physics and mathematics of superstring theory. The high-energy theorists have close connections to the nuclear theory group, the astrophysics group, the high-energy experimentalists, and to members of the Mathematics Department.

Experimental: The experimental high-energy physics group is engaged in a number of experiments at the research frontiers of the field, both in subatomic physics and in high-energy astrophysics. These include:

  • Electron-positron collisions: a group works on the BaBar experiment at SLAC and the Belle-2 experiment at the KEK laboratory in Japan, with specific interest in CKM matrix elements and physics beyond the Standard Model through studies of rare decays, and on R&D for a future International Linear Collider, with interest in calorimeter development.
  • Hadron-hadron collisions: A group is involved in major contributions to the energy frontier at CERN's LHC, with work on the High Level Trigger for the ATLAS experiment. Work also focuses on searches for new physics phenomena, precision physics of known Standard Model processes, development of the ATLAS experiment's trigger system, and direct contribution to the upgrade of the ATLAS detector.
  • High-energy particle astrophysics: ground-based gamma-ray astronomy using the VERITAS telescope array and development of the next-generation detector.
  • Underground physics: A group carries out experimental R&D with the aim of measuring, for the first time, the neutrinoless double-beta decay process with the EXO experiment.

Students at the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels are offered a strong program of research in a challenging and rapidly advancing field. Short term master's projects are based mainly on instrumentation or data analysis conducted on campus, while Ph.D. research may involve an extended stay at one of the world's major research laboratories.

Nuclear Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs include transport equations for heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy; nuclear equation of state from heavy ion collisions; fragmentation at intermediate energy; electromagnetic probes in relativistic heavy ion collisions; effective Lagrangians for hadronic systems at finite temperature; and Quark-Gluon Plasma, QCD.

Experimental: Current research programs in experimental nuclear physics at McGill are focused on two main axes:

  • The study of heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies to determine the properties of nuclear matter at high temperatures and density. This program is being performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Large Hadron Collider facility at CERN.
  • The study of ground state properties of unstable nuclei using laser spectroscopy techniques and ion traps. This work is being carried out using the Canadian Penning trap facility at the Argonne National Laboratory, at the accelerator ISOLDE (CERN), and the ISAC facility at TRIUMF.

Furthermore, the Nuclear Physics Group has an active in-house research program that applies the ion trap and laser techniques to the detection of trace quantities of material and contaminants, and to ion spectroscopy.

Condensed Matter Physics and Biophysics

Theoretical: Current research programs involve the nonequilibrium, ab-initio modelling of molecular and nanoelectronic systems and devices; the study of quantum effects in interacting mesoscopic electron systems; nonequilibrium phenomena in extended systems; and applications of statistical mechanics to problems in biophysics.

Experimental: Current research programs involve:

  • the study of the time evolution of non-equilibrium systems via x-ray diffraction;
  • fundamental quantum properties of strongly correlated systems at temperatures very near absolute zero;
  • macromolecular interactions in living cells using single-photon and two-photon imaging;
  • molecular electronics and nanoelectronic systems by scanning probe microscopy;
  • dynamics and mechanical properties of soft matter systems and spatial organization and dynamics in living cells;
  • mechanical behaviour of very small systems by high-resolution force microscopy;
  • electronic properties that emerge at the limits of miniaturization and quantum computing;
  • nuclear methods to study interactions in magnetic materials that lead to exotic magnetic ordering behaviour. This includes studies of novel materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, unconventional superconductors, quantum dots, heterostructures, amorphous systems, and spin glasses.

Astrophysics

Research in the astrophysics group covers a wide range of topics including cosmology, galaxy formation, high-energy astrophysics, and extrasolar planets. This involves observations at all wavelengths, from gamma rays and X-rays to sub-mm, infrared, and radio, using international observatories in space and on the ground. Experimental groups at McGill are involved in development and operation of ground-based high-energy gamma-ray observatories, and cosmic microwave background experiments. Theoretical work includes studies of how astrophysics and observational cosmology can experimentally determine the most important properties of dark matter and dark energy, studies of the diverse physics of neutron stars, and extrasolar planet formation.

Nonlinear Variability and Atmospheric Physics

This group studies nonlinear dynamical processes in the atmosphere and other geophysical systems, especially those associated with turbulent, chaotic, and extremely variable behaviour. Emphasis is placed on multifractal analysis and modelling as well as the development of new theories and techniques covering wide ranges of scale in time and space. Data from a variety of in situ and remotely sensed sources are used. This includes satellite data of the Earth's atmosphere and surface as well as high-quality precipitation data from the McGill Radar Weather Observatory.

Medical Radiation Physics

The Medical Physics Unit is a teaching and research unit concerned with the application of physics and related sciences in medicine, especially (but not exclusively) in radiation medicine; i.e., radiation oncology, medical imaging, and nuclear medicine. The Unit's facilities are available for students to undertake a Ph.D. in Physics administered through the Department of Physics with a research emphasis on medical physics supervised, funded, and hosted by Medical Physics Unit PIs (principal investigators).

The research interests of Unit members include various aspects of medical imaging, including:

  • 3D imaging;
  • the development of new imaging modalities;
  • applications of imaging in radiation therapy such as radiation dosimetry and solid state;
  • nuclear cardiology; and
  • applications of radiation biology to therapy.
Master of Science (M.Sc.) Physics (Thesis) (45 credits)

This program provides a comprehensive introduction to the academic, research, and practical aspects of physics. The primary goal of this program is to provide students with unique opportunities to learn fundamental research techniques in experimental and/or theoretical research, and objectively synthesize information from scientific literature. Each M.Sc. student chooses their preferred major research area and research supervisor. Thesis work is available in a broad range of sub-disciplines (see departmental website for details). Students wishing to continue to our doctoral program have the option, with supervisor approval, of transferring directly to the Ph.D., waiving the M.Sc. thesis submission.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Physics

The doctoral program provides all the tools required for a competitive career in academic settings, as well as in industry or other fields. The multidisciplinary nature of the Department exposes students to a vast array of research interests and experimental or theoretical approaches. Graduate research activities leading to the presentation of a Ph.D. thesis involve original work, with distinct contributions to knowledge. Our graduate program offers training in a unique and multidisciplinary environment in Canada's top university and may involve an extended stay at one of the world's major research laboratories.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 16, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs in Physics

Psychology

Psychology

Location

  • Department of Psychology
  • 2001 McGill College Avenue, 7th Floor
  • Montreal QC H3A 1G1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6127/514-398-6100
  • Fax: 514-398-4896
  • Email: chantale.bousquet [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/psychology

About Psychology

The aim of the Experimental program is to provide students with an environment in which they are free to develop skills and expertise that will serve during a professional career of teaching and research as a psychologist. Coursework and other requirements are at a minimum. Success in the program depends on the student's ability to organize unscheduled time for self education. Continuous involvement in research planning and execution is considered a very important component of the student's activities. Students are normally expected to do both master’s and doctoral study.

M.A. and M.Sc. degrees may be awarded in Experimental Psychology, but only as a step to the Ph.D.—students undergo formal evaluation beginning with the submission of their master's requirements (thesis or fast-track paper) to enter Ph.D. 2.

The Clinical program adheres to the scientist practitioner model and as such is designed to train students for careers in university teaching or clinical research, and for service careers (working with children or adults in hospital, clinical, or educational settings). Most of our clinical graduates combine service and research roles. While there are necessarily many more course requirements than in the Experimental program, the emphasis is again on research training. There is no master’s program in Clinical Psychology; the Department offers direct entry to a doctoral degree for holders of an undergraduate degree, and students are expected to complete the full program leading to a doctoral degree.

Research interests of members of the Psychology Department include:

  • behavioural neuroscience;
  • clinical psychology;
  • cognition & cognitive neuroscience;
  • developmental science;
  • health psychology;
  • quantitative psychology & modelling;
  • social & personality psychology.

Facilities for advanced research in a variety of fields are available within the Department itself. In addition, arrangements exist with the Departments of Psychology at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Allan Memorial Institute, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal Children's Hospital, and Montreal General Hospital to permit graduate students to undertake research in a hospital setting.

Note: Many MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are now located at the Glen site; further information is available on the MUHC website.

For inquiries about all programs and financial aid, and for application forms, contact the chantale.bousquet [at] mcgill.ca (Graduate Program Administrator)

Ph.D. Option in Behavioural Neuroscience

Information about this option is available from the Department and at www.mcgill.ca/psychology/graduate/program-tracks.

Ph.D. Option in Language Acquisition (LAP)

Information about this option is available from the Department and at www.psych.mcgill.ca/lap.html and www.mcgill.ca/psychology/graduate/program-tracks/experimental/additional-program-opportunities.

Ph.D. Option in Psychosocial Oncology (PSO)

A cross-disciplinary option in Psychosocial Oncology is offered within the existing Ph.D. program in Psychology. Information about this option is available from the Department and at www.medicine.mcgill.ca/oncology/programs/programs_psychosocialoncology.asp and www.mcgill.ca/psychology/graduate/program-tracks/clinical/additional-program-opportunities.

Arts > Graduate > Browse Academic Units & Programs > Psychology > Master of Arts (M.A.) Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)

Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.

Science > Graduate > Browse Academic Units & Programs > Psychology > Master of Science (M.Sc.) Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)

Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Psychology

Please contact the Department for more information about this program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Psychology: Behavioural Neuroscience

The Ph.D. in Psychology: Behavioural Neuroscience program emphasizes modern, advanced theory and methodology aimed at the neurological underpinnings of behaviour in human and non-human animals. This program is intended for graduate students in any area of Psychology who wish to obtain unique, intensive training at the intersection of psychology and neuroscience, thereby enhancing their expertise, the interdisciplinary potential of their dissertation research, and enabling them to compete successfully for academic or commercial positions in either field alone, or their intersection. It requires that students complete a dissertation that addresses Behavioural Neuroscience themes.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Psychology: Language Acquisition

This unique interdisciplinary program focuses on the scientific exploration of language acquisition by different kinds of learners in diverse contexts. Students in the Language Acquisition program are introduced to theoretical and methodological issues on language acquisition from the perspectives of cognitive neuroscience, theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics, education, communication sciences and disorders, and neuropsychology.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Psychology: Psychosocial Oncology

The Department of Oncology, in conjunction with the Ingram School of Nursing, the Department of Psychology, and the School of Social Work, has developed the cross-disciplinary Psychosocial Oncology Option (PSOO). This option is open to doctoral students in the Ingram School of Nursing and in the Department of Psychology who are interested in broadening their knowledge of psychosocial issues in oncology.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Mar. 3, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs in Psychology

Redpath Museum

Redpath Museum

Location

  • Redpath Museum
  • 859 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C4
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4086
  • Email: redpath.museum [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/redpath

About Redpath Museum

The Redpath Museum is a unique interdisciplinary unit within the Faculty of Science offering graduate training in research devoted to biodiversity, ecology, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology, leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. It is an institution with extensive collections of ancient and modern organisms, minerals, and cultural artifacts. Research and teaching are centred on collections-based study, object-oriented investigation, and fieldwork. The Museum has a unique public engagement mission with large exhibit galleries and a vibrant outreach program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 16, 2020).

› How to apply to graduate programs at the Redpath Museum


Interfaculty programs

› Integrated Program in Neuroscience

› Quantitative Life Sciences

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