Event

Human Trafficking: What You Need To Know

Tuesday, November 8, 2022 13:00to15:00

Human trafficking can happen to any person, regardless of age, culture, income, orientation, gender, or neighbourhood. Traffickers find their victims online, at schools, malls, parties, libraries, hotels, and bus stops. Studies have shown that although traffickers recruit from all areas and backgrounds, marginalized, lower-income young people are often more at risk. What many trafficking victims have in common is low self-esteem and other concerns that make them vulnerable. Traffickers promise their victims love, security, acceptance, money, shelter, and food.

To learn more, come join our anti- trafficking workshop on Tuesday, November 8,2022, from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm.

This workshop aims to promote awareness about what is human trafficking, recognizing red flags, and feeling empowered to help yourself, peers and your community to make choices and access appropriate resources.

Presented by Dr. Olivia Smith, Visiting Scholar, Max Bell School of Public Policy

Safety in Canada's "Human Trafficking- Isn't What You Think It Is"

 

Presenters

Jose Alfaro is a consultant and Lived Experience Expert on Domestic Child Sex Trafficking, Public Speaker, Author, Advocate, and Activist. He has worked with several anti-human trafficking organizations around the globe, to spread awareness of trafficking, specifically within the LGBTQ+ Community and among males. He has been featured in several publications including Rolling Stone and has worked with law enforcement, DHS, and the DOJ to name a few.


Julia Drydyk is the Executive Director of The Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking (“the Centre”), a national charity dedicated to ending all types of human trafficking in Canada. A skilled and insightful researcher with a background in community engagement, policy development, and advocacy, Julia is focused on addressing complex social issues.

Julia began her tenure at the Centre as the Manager of Research and Policy, studying human trafficking trends, including who is being trafficked and how, as well as what conditions make trafficking possible in Canada.


Sarah Tunstall is a Lived Experience specialist and case manager at Voice Found. Anti-human trafficking consultant and advocate. Honours degree in Child and Youth studies with a minor in Indigenous Studies. Program ambassador at Carleton University 2020 - 2021. Survivor of sex trafficking and gender-based violence.

Strong passion for transformative justice projects, anti-human trafficking advocacy, trauma informed program design, frontline education, mental health advocacy, and grassroots fundraising initiatives. Lived Experience specialist and case manager at Voice Found. Anti-human trafficking consultant and advocate. Honours degree in Child and Youth studies with a minor in Indigenous Studies. Program ambassador at Carleton University 2020 - 2021. Survivor of sex trafficking and gender-based violence. Strong passion for transformative justice projects, anti-human trafficking advocacy, trauma informed program design, frontline education, mental health advocacy, and grassroots fundraising initiatives.


Michael John Riopel has been working for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), as a civilian member, for over 26 years. Within those years, he has been providing operational support. His expertise is with various specialized departments such as the integrated Proceeds of Crime Unit and the Integrated National Security Enforcement Team.

Since 2018 he has been the Human Trafficking Awareness Coordinator, for the province of Quebec for the RCMP.


Corporal Eric Paradis has been an RCMP member in Quebec since 2008. He has investigated various tobacco and narcotic smuggling networks in the Greater Montreal Area, for which the majority of cases ended in successful convictions. He was an RCMP liaison for Missing Persons and Amber Alert files in Quebec from 2013 to 2019. Currently a team supervisor at the Airport and Federal Investigations Detachment, he has worked on different human trafficking investigations mostly involving the exploitation of temporary migrant workers.

Twitter

Back to top