Public outreach

13Aug202012:00
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13:00

Epidemiologist and Chief Innovation Officer at Boston Children’s Hospital Dr. John Brownstein has been working on a number of research projects with respect to COVID-19 surveillance. Among them, early detection and global tracking of COVID-19 with HealthMap, as well as crowdsourcing of illness in communities across the United States and Canada with COVID Near You, which encourages people to "submit" how they are feeling. We speak with Dr. Brownstein on this week's "COVID and More".

Classified as: OSS, Joe Schwarcz, alumni, mcgill alumni, hs-communications, Redpath Museum, Faculty of Science, covid19, coronavirus, Harvard
18Aug202012:00
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13:00

Are you ready to challenge yourself, learn from others, and make a positive impact?

Join the Max Bell School of Public Policy and McCall MacBain Scholars for a joint information session that will provide an overview of the Max Bell School's Master of Public Policy (MPP) Program, and the McCall MacBain Scholarship, a full scholarship for master's or professional studies at McGill.

Classified as: max bell school, max bell school of public policy
22Sep2020
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25Sep2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the world, pushing the global economy into recession and forcing countries to take on nearly unprecedented levels of public debt. Discussion and debate over the pathway to economic recovery are already underway. In this context, monetary policy is a crucial policy tool.

The Bank of Canada’s mandate is up for renewal next year, and it is time to start thinking about what monetary policy in the post-pandemic era should look like.

Classified as: max bell school, max bell school of public policy, economy, Bank of Canada, choosing the right target
19Oct202012:00
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14:00

This is the age of the pandemic. And that is truly terrifying. But it is also the age of the “infodemic,” and that too has some chilling features. We are relentlessly bombarded by a tsunami of information, the reliability of which is often questionable, especially when the source is social media. When it comes to controversial issues, be it in the area of medicine, nutrition, or environmental concerns, bloggers and politicians with sketchy relevant backgrounds are as likely to throw their hat into the ring as scientific experts.

Classified as: Office for Science and Society, OSS, Joe Schwarcz, hs-communications, Friends of the Library, alumni, mcgill alumni
26Oct202012:00
to
14:00

This is the age of the pandemic. And that is truly terrifying. But it is also the age of the “infodemic,” and that too has some chilling features. We are relentlessly bombarded by a tsunami of information, the reliability of which is often questionable, especially when the source is social media. When it comes to controversial issues, be it in the area of medicine, nutrition, or environmental concerns, bloggers and politicians with sketchy relevant backgrounds are as likely to throw their hat into the ring as scientific experts.

Classified as: Office for Science and Society, OSS, Joe Schwarcz, hs-communications, Friends of the Library, alumni, mcgill alumni
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