Research Areas

Biomaterials

Biomaterials are intended to be used as medical devices in contact with biological tissues and range from contact lenses to prosthetics for hip replacement. In our department we work on a broad range of biomaterials; from polymers and composites to ceramic to metals. Research on biomaterials is also strictly connected to tissue and regenerative engineering as well as drug delivery. We have expertise in these areas: we build different types of scaffolds and gels that not only accommodate cells inside but also influence their responses. We also build gels or nanoparticles that can deliver drugs at specific locations, on-demand.

     
Marta
Cerruti
Showan
Nazhat
Sidney
Omelon
Mihriban
Ozden
Pekguleryuz
Stephen
Yue
     

Computational Materials Engineering

Computational methods are becoming increasingly important in all areas of science and engineering. Recent advances in computational techniques, such as density-functional theory calculations and multiscale modeling, offer significant insights into material behaviors at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic scale. Using this computational approach, we understand the fundamental behavior of materials and provide novel solutions to improve the properties or processing of the materials for various applications, such as predicting electronic and structural properties and modeling the chemical kinetics and equilibria to optimize a material processing route. Similarly, at the macro-scale, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) allows us to design, model, and optimize all Mineral, Metals, & Materials Processes at the industrial scale.

   
Kirk H.
Bevan
Raynald
Gauvin
Roderick I L
Guthrie
Mainul
Hasan
Jinhyuk
Lee
Jun
Song
   

Energy, Electronic, and Environmental Materials

Energy, electronic, and environmental materials refer to the classes of materials that are used in energy conversion/storage/harvesting devices (e.g., batteries, solar cells, supercapacitors, photocatalysts), electronic devices (e.g., semiconductor-based computer chips, light-emitting diodes, lasers), and environmental applications (e.g., sustainable processing, wastewater treatment, recycling). Designing these materials or processing routes requires a fundamental understanding of materials structure-properties-performance relationship for relevant applications. In our department, we use both experimental and computational approaches to accelerate the discovery of these materials.

Kirk H.
Bevan
Marta
Cerruti
Richard
Chromik
George
Demopoulos
Raynald
Gauvin
Jinhyuk
Lee
Sidney
Omelon
             
Nathaniel
Quitoriano
Jun
Song
             

Materials Characterization

Materials characterization refers to the process by which a material’s structure and properties are probed and measured. It is a fundamental process in materials engineering, paramount to our scientific understanding of engineering materials. In our department we have expertise with many tools used to understand material composition, crystalline structure, microstructure, morphology, and electronic structure at different length scales, including scanning electron microscopes, X-ray diffractometers, X-ray tomography systems, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometers. The information gained with these tools is then used to design materials with improved properties and performance.

   
Marta
Cerruti
Richard
Chromik
Raynald
Gauvin
Jinhyuk
Lee
Sidney
Omelon
Nathaniel
Quitoriano
   

Materials Process Engineering and Design

Materials processing and design involves planning and performing a series of chemical, thermal, and physical steps that involve making a starting material, form it into a shape, and then refine the structure and shape as needed. The goal of materials processing and design is to develop the features needed for the product to perform well in its intended application at a profitable cost and minimal adverse effect on the environment and human health. Our department achieves this by combining various advanced techniques, such as additive manufacturing, cold spraying, coatings, pyro- and hydro-chemical methods, endowing novel shapes and properties to materials for diverse applications.

Mathieu
Brochu
Richard
Chromik
George
Demopoulos
Roderick I L
Guthrie
Mainul
Hasan
Sidney
Omelon
Philippe
Ouzilleau
             
Mihriban
Ozden
Pekguleryuz
Stephen
Yue
             

Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy

Mineral processing and extractive metallurgy form a nexus within the material value chain by channelling mineral resources into global markets, supplying vital raw materials for construction and manufacturing. Our department, including both the materials and the mining sections, has expertise in all aspects of mining, mineral processing and extractive metallurgy, including laboratory experiments, computational modelling and state-of-the-art approaches to process design, process control and system integration. Current challenges include energy utilization, waste stream treatment, process decarbonization, and the sustainable supplying of so-called critical materials (lithium, cobalt, graphite, rare earth elements, etc.).

George
Demopoulos
Roderick I L
Guthrie
Mainul
Hasan
Sidney
Omelon
Philippe
Ouzilleau
Kristian
Waters

Structural Materials

This area focuses on the relationship between the structure of materials and their mechanical and chemical properties to understand how different materials perform in various load-bearing applications, such as automotive, aerospace, and biological applications. Structural materials include steels, magnesium alloys, aluminum alloys, concretes, and composites designed to be strong, light, formable, and endure extreme temperature and harsh chemical environments. To achieve this, various strategies, including alloying, texture engineering, and surface engineering, are employed, tailoring the properties of materials’ bulk and surface structure.

Mathieu
Brochu
Richard
Chromik
Roderick I L
Guthrie
Mihriban
Ozden
Pekguleryuz
Jun
Song
Stephen
Yue
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