Mars

 

Professor Lyle White, Natural Resource Sciences, is interviewed on his role in Mars exploration and the Exomars Space Probe.

Listen to the interview

 

 

 

Classified as: Mars, lyle whyte, Exomars Space Probe, Mars exploration, polar microbial life
Published on: 22 Mar 2016

 

"It doesn't mean there's no life on Mars, but what it does mean is it's going to be harder to find," said Jacqueline Goordial, the McGill University researcher who led the study, in an interview with Rachelle Solomon on CBC's Breakaway.

Classified as: Mars, Antarctic, Arctic, lyle whyte, Life on Mars, Jacqueline Goordial
Published on: 25 Jan 2016

Failure to find active microbes in coldest Antarctic soils has implications for search for life on Mars

Natural Resource Sciences professor Lyle Whyte and postdoctoral fellow Jackie Goordial talk about their research which suggests that it is unlikely that it is unlikely that there is any microbial life to be found on Mars.

Classified as: NASA, Mars, Antarctic, Arctic, lyle whyte, science and technology, microbial life, permafrost soil, Phoenix landing site, ecosystem
Published on: 19 Jan 2016

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

Failure to find active microbes in coldest Antarctic soils has implications for search for life on Mars

Classified as: NASA, Mars, Antarctic, Arctic, lyle whyte, science and technology, microbial life, permafrost soil, Phoenix landing site, ecosystem
Published on: 19 Jan 2016

Classified as: NASA, Mars, Arctic, microbes, lyle whyte
Category:
Published on: 28 Sep 2015

Weather, which changes day-to-day due to constant fluctuations in the atmosphere, and climate, which varies over decades, are familiar. More recently, a third regime, called “macroweather,” has been used to describe the relatively stable regime between weather and climate.

Classified as: physics, climate, lovejoy, macroweather, weather, Mars, Geophysical Research Letters, atmosphere, Muller
Published on: 13 Nov 2014

The temperature in the permafrost on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian high Arctic is nearly as cold as that of the surface of Mars. So the recent discovery by a McGill University led team of scientists of a bacterium that is able to thrive at –15ºC, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, is exciting.  The bacterium offers clues about some of the necessary preconditions for microbial life on both the Saturn moon Enceladus and Mars, where similar briny subzero conditions are thought to exist.

Classified as: Bacterium, Canada Research Chairs Program, Canadian Space Agency, High Arctic, Mars, Polar Continental Shelf Program, CFI, NSERC CREATE Canadian Astrobiology Training Program
Category:
Published on: 22 May 2013