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Human sounds convey emotions better than words do

It takes just one-tenth of a second for our brains to begin to recognize emotions conveyed by vocalizations, according to researchers from McGill. It doesn’t matter whether the non-verbal sounds are growls of anger, the laughter of happiness or cries of sadness. More importantly, the researchers have also discovered that we pay more attention when an emotion (such as happiness, sadness or anger) is expressed through vocalizations than we do when the same emotion is expressed in speech.

Published on : 18 Jan 2016

What is your memory style?

Why is it that some people have richly detailed recollection of past experiences (episodic memory), while others tend to remember just the facts without details (semantic memory)? A research team from the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences has shown for the first time that these different ways of experiencing the past are associated with distinct brain connectivity patterns that may be inherent to the individual and suggest a life-long “memory trait”.   The study was recently published online in the journal Cortex.

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Published on : 15 Dec 2015

There’s More Than Meets the Eye When Making Choices

If you’re pondering whether to buy a Galaxy smartphone or an iPhone this holiday season, a part of the brain called the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (PFC) might ultimately determine your choice. Results of a new study by Avinash Vaidya and Dr. Lesley Fellows, researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro), suggest that this region of the brain plays a critical role in making choices.

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Published on : 14 Dec 2015

Breakthrough in "marriage-broker" protein

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre, have made a breakthrough in understanding an important protein that appears to act as a kind of cellular “marriage broker.” The protein called Netrin1 brings cells together and maintains their healthy relationships. Netrin1 plays an essential role in the growth of the human organism, directing cell migration and the formation of cell circuits both at the embryo stage and after birth.

Published on : 12 Aug 2015

Breakthrough in "marriage-broker" protein

Discovery provides new tool for understanding and treating neurodegenerative diseases

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Published on : 12 Aug 2015

Waiting for pleasure

Researchers at McGill have clearly identified, for the first time, the specific parts of the brain involved in decisions that call for delayed gratification.

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Published on : 04 Aug 2015

Neuro awarded over $15 M in CIHR funding

Researchers get inaugural Foundation grants for high-impact, long-term programs Researchers from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University have been awarded over $15 million in grants in the latest round of funding by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). The grants are part of over $600 million in national funding, announced July 28 by Minister of Health Rona Ambrose.

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Published on : 28 Jul 2015

Practice doesn’t always make perfect

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? New research on the brain’s capacity to learn suggests there’s more to it than the adage that “practise makes perfect.” A music-training study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and colleagues in Germany found evidence to distinguish the parts of the brain that account for individual talent from the parts that are activated through training.

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Published on : 28 Jul 2015

Practice doesn’t always make perfect (depending on your brain)

Study fuels nature versus nurture debate How do you get to Carnegie Hall? New research on the brain’s capacity to learn suggests there’s more to it than the adage that “practise makes perfect.” A music-training study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and colleagues in Germany found evidence to distinguish the parts of the brain that account for individual talent from the parts that are activated through training.

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Published on : 28 Jul 2015

How insulin calms brain activity

Insulin has long been known as the hormone which controls the body’s sugar levels: humans who lack or are insensitive to insulin develop diabetes. Although insulin is also made and released in the brain, its effects there have remained unclear.

Published on : 30 Jun 2015

Stroke month - June

Time is brain: for every minute a stroke is left untreated, 2 million brain cells are destroyed. The sooner patients are treated, the higher the chances of survival with fewer disabilities.  Patients with acute strokes and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are assessed and treated at the right place, the right time and by the right professionals thanks to ultra-specialized stroke centres at the Montreal General Hospital  and The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital.

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Published on : 22 Jun 2015

Neuro researchers awarded over $4.5 M from CQDM, Brain Canada and the Ontario Brain Institute

Researchers from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University and the MUHC, have received a total of over $4.5 M in funding, for innovative projects to accelerate diagnosis and drug discovery for diseases of the brain, including Alzheimer’s. CQDM, Brain Canada Foundation and the Ontario Brain Institute made the announcement at the annual conference of the Canadian Association for Neuroscience in Vancouver. Six Canadian research teams share a total investment of $ 10 million, through the strategic "Focus on Brain" initiative.

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Published on : 10 Jun 2015

ALS Awareness Month – June

As a major Canadian centre for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) research and treatment, the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro, invites the public and the media to learn more about the disease and current research and treatments, to donate money for ALS research and to wear the national emblem of ALS in Canada, the blue cornflower, during ALS Awareness Month in June.

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Published on : 02 Jun 2015