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Faculty of Science news

MS Office 365 ProPlus now available for faculty, staff, and students

McGill faculty and staff members now have FREE access to Office 365 ProPlus on personal devices, including computers (PCs and Macs),  tablets (iPad and Windows), and smartphones (iPhone, Android, and Windows). This includes the latest versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and other Office apps. For faculty and staff, this service replaces the Office portion of the Microsoft Work at Home program. Students already (and still!) have free access to Office 365 ProPlus.

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Published on : 23 Jan 2015

Register now for Mini-Science 2015: To infinity and beyond: From neutron stars to neuroengineering

Register now for Mini-Science, a unique 7-week public lecture series from McGill University’s Faculty of Science, designed to offer the public an insider's view of science. This year's theme is 'To infinity and beyond: From neutron stars to neuroengineering.' The series introduces how our scientists learn about space and explores new research in neuroengineering.

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Published on : 22 Jan 2015

Current nutrition labeling is hard to digest

Current government-mandated nutrition labeling is ineffective in improving nutrition, but there is a better system available, according to a study by McGill University researchers published in the December issue of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Published on : 20 Jan 2015

MS Office 365 ProPlus now available for faculty & staff

McGill faculty and staff members now have FREE access to Office 365 ProPlus, which includes the latest versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and other Office apps. The service allows you to install the Office suite on up to 5 personal devices*, including PCs, Macs, and 5 iPad and Windows tablets.

Published on : 19 Jan 2015

Social equity in urban transportation planning

During the 20th century, urban transportation planning in North America was mainly concerned with easing traffic congestion, improving safety and saving time for motorists. These days, most cities’ transportation plans evoke a more complex blend of environmental, economic, and social-equity goals – all aimed at promoting “sustainability.” Yet, many fail to include meaningful measurements of social-equity objectives, such as helping disadvantaged neighborhoods access essential services, according to researchers at McGill University.

Published on : 07 Jan 2015

Better dam planning strategies

When dams are built they have an impact not only on the flow of water in the river, but also on the people who live downstream and on the surrounding ecosystems. By placing data from close to 6,500 existing large dams on a highly precise map of the world’s rivers, an international team led by McGill University researchers has created a new method to estimate the global impacts of dams on river flow and fragmentation.

Published on : 06 Jan 2015

Tracking down the origins of the Ebola outbreak

To address these questions, Dr. Fabian Leendertz of the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin assembled a large international interdisciplinary team consisting of virologists, veterinarians, ecologists, epidemiologists and an anthropologist. One member was Jan Gogarten, a doctoral student in Biology and Vanier graduate scholar at McGill.  We spoke with Gogarten about the resulting study, published this week in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine, and his role in it.

Published on : 30 Dec 2014

Making the most of a shitty situation

The distinctive “fecal prints” of microbes potentially provide a record of how Earth and life have co-evolved over the past 3.5 billion years as the planet’s temperature, oxygen levels, and greenhouse gases have changed. But, despite more than 60 years of study, it has proved difficult, until now, to “read” much of the information contained in this record. Research from McGill University and Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), sheds light on the mysterious digestive processes of microbes, opening the way towards a better understanding of how life and the planet have changed over time.

Published on : 23 Dec 2014

Prof. Charles Gale, Humboldt Research Award

Congratulations to Dr. Charles Gale, James McGill Professor in the Department of Physics, for winning a Humboldt Research Award! Valued at 60,000 EUR, this award is granted by Germany's Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung/Foundation in recognition of a researcher's entire achievements to date. The award recognizes scholars whose fundamental discoveries, new theories, or insights have had a significant impact on their own discipline and who are expected to continue producing cutting-edge achievements in the future.

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Published on : 16 Dec 2014

Prof. Victoria Kaspi, Fellow of the American Physical Society

Congratulations to Professor Victoria Kaspi in the Department of Physics! She has been elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society for advancing our understanding of the astrophysics of neutron stars by elucidating the relationship between anomalous X-ray pulsars, soft gamma-ray repeaters, and magnetars.

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Published on : 16 Dec 2014

TV Broadcasts: Trottier Symposium and Mini-Science

Got an itch for knowledge? The Canal Savoir network will be broadcasting features from several McGill outreach and public lecture series, including the 2014 Lorne Trottier Public Science Symposium: Are we alone? Searching for life out there and Mini-Science 2014: The Science of Music. Refer to those schedules to find out when to tune in, and to find out more about each episode.

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Published on : 09 Dec 2014

Parasites and the evolution of primate culture

Learning from others and innovation have undoubtedly helped advance civilization. But these behaviours can carry costs as well as benefits. And a new study by an international team of evolutionary biologists sheds light on how one particular cost – increased exposure to parasites – may affect cultural evolution in non-human primates.

Published on : 03 Dec 2014