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Cancer

4-week prehabilitation prepares cancer patients for surgery

Positive results for colorectal cancer patients from pre-operative program that combines nutritional supplements, relaxation techniques and exercise
Thu, 2016-12-01 09:28

Just four weeks of prehabilitation (pre-surgery preparation) may be enough to help some cancer patients get in shape for surgery. That’s according to a recent study of close to 120 colorectal cancer patients in Montreal. This potentially means that, barring unforeseen circumstances that stem from the surgery itself, their recovery is likely to be speedier too, according to earlier research from the same McGill-led team.

Contact Information

Contact: Celena Scheede-Bergdahl
Organization: Dept. of Kinesiology and Physical Education, McGill University
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Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations, McGill University
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Source Site: /newsroom

Medication against schizophrenia inhibits pancreatic cancer

Study in mice shows slowing of tumor growth and spread
Wed, 2016-09-07 09:14

A receptor for the dopamine neurotransmitter promotes growth and spread of pancreatic cancer -- and schizophrenia drugs, which block the function of this receptor, slowed tumor growth and metastatic spread in mice, according to researchers at McGill University and the German Cancer Research Center.

Contact Information

Contact: Yasser Riazalhosseini
Organization: Dept of Human Genetics
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Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Chris Chipello
Organization: Media Relations Office
Office Phone: 514-398-4201
Source Site: /newsroom

The impact of night work on our immune system

Tue, 2016-06-14 10:15

McGill Newsroom

Study reveals the impact of night work

You cross paths with him at the break of dawn in the corridors of the Metro. He looks bleary-eyed and pallid. This worker’s night shift just ended. His body clocks are out of sync with one another, and, imperceptibly, they’re also out of sync with his environment. In the long run, this night owl could be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular, autoimmune diseases or certain types of cancer.

Contact Information

Contact: Bruno Geoffroy
Organization: Information officer - Public relations services - Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux de l’Ouest-de-l’Île-de-Montréal
Email:
Office Phone: 514 630-2225 ext. 5257
Source Site: /newsroom

New name for McGill Department of Oncology

Mon, 2016-06-13 11:26

McGill Newsroom

Newly named Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology recognizes family’s enduring support

In recognition of the Bronfman family’s enduring support for oncology programs and research at McGill University, the Faculty of Medicine’s Department of Oncology has been named the Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology, in honour of one of the family’s major benefactors.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6754
Source Site: /newsroom

Goodman Cancer Research Gala raises $2.1 million

Mon, 2016-06-06 14:33

McGill Newsroom

Pioneering research at McGill’s Goodman Cancer Research Centre gets boost

The 4th Goodman Cancer Research Gala has raised more than $2.1 million to fund foundational research, more effective diagnostic tools and the development of new treatments and therapies for cancer patients.  The Gala was held on Sunday, June 5 in Montreal, bringing together more than 800 guests in support of McGill University’s Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations Office - McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6754
Source Site: /newsroom

Diabetes drug found not to cause pancreatic cancer

Canada’s national drug safety network conducted the largest study ever to determine whether incretin-based drugs are associated with pancreatic cancer. Researchers concluded that no such association exists.
Mon, 2016-02-22 14:03

By Tod Hoffman, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research

The use of incretin-based drugs is not associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the latest issue of the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

The research was conducted by the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies (CNODES), which used the health records of almost 1 million patients with types 2 diabetes.

Contact Information

Contact: Tod Hoffman
Organization: Research Communications Officer - Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research
Email:
Office Phone: 514-340-8222 x 8661
Mobile Phone: 514-433-3500
Source Site: /newsroom

Simultaneous PET/MR Imaging for Brain, Cardiac and Cancer Research

Wed, 2016-01-20 13:30 - 15:30
Montreal Neurological Institute : DeGrandpré Communication Centre, 3801 rue University Montreal Quebec Canada , H3A 2B4

The future of in vivo imaging is not only in new and improved scanner technology – with constantly augmenting sensitivity, spatial and temporal resolution – but also in our capacity, in health and disease, to target the largest choice of metabolic

Contact Information

Contact: Sylvain Baillet
Organization: McConnell Brain Imaging Centre
Email:
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Source Site: /bic

A new way to starve lung cancer?

Tue, 2015-10-20 09:34

Preventing cancer cells from growing by understanding what they 'eat'.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6754

Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Dmitry Malkov
Organization: ITMO University
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Source Site: /newsroom

Innate immunity may help limit cancer growth

Cancer immunotherapy, a relatively new frontier in cancer treatment, works by enhancing the capacity of one's immune system to attack cancer cells. To date, this field has focused on developing cancer vaccines or engineering specialized cells called lymphocytes capable of binding specific proteins produced by cancer cells but not by normal cells
Wed, 2015-09-16 12:53

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email:
Office Phone: 514 398-6754
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

Breakthrough in fight against muscle wasting diseases

MUHC/McGill research team identifies new drug target considered a potential game-changer for cancer patients
Tue, 2015-09-15 09:51

It is estimated that half of all cancer patients suffer from a muscle wasting syndrome called cachexia. Cancer cachexia impairs quality of life and response to therapy, which increases morbidity and mortality of cancer patients. Currently, there is no approved treatment for muscle wasting but a new study from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and University of Alberta could be a game changer for patients, improving both quality of life and longevity. The research team discovered a new gene involved in muscle wasting that could be a good target for drug development.

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Source Site: /newsroom