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drugs

Unleashing the watchdog protein

Thu, 2013-05-09 14:38

Research opens door to new drug therapies for Parkinson’s disease

McGill University researchers have unlocked a new door to developing drugs to slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Collaborating teams led by Dr. Edward A. Fon at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, and  Dr. Kalle Gehring  in the Department of Biochemistry at the Faculty of Medicine, have discovered the three-dimensional structure of the protein Parkin.

Contact Information

Contact: Anita Kar
Organization: The Neuro
Email:
Office Phone: 514 398 3376
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Freaky Friday: Bugs, Drugs and the Amazing Race

Fri, 2013-03-08 17:00 - 20:00
Redpath Museum : auditorium, 859 rue Sherbrooke Ouest Montreal Quebec Canada , H3A 0C4
Price: Free, everyone welcome, no reservation necessary.

By   Richard Silverman and Erin Lafferty 

(Faculty of Medicine, McGill)

Wonder why you keep hearing about so many new infectious diseases? How do we manage them? Come explore the perpetual arms race between humans and microbes as we both battle for survival in our modern world.  This talk will be followed by a screening of the movie    Contagion.

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Source Site: /redpath

Addiction: abnormal communication in the brain

Tue, 2013-02-05 17:09

January 29, 2013 - Addiction to cigarettes, drugs and other stimulants has been linked in the past to the brain’s frontal lobes, but now there is scientific evidence that indicates where in the frontal cortex addiction takes hold and how.  Addiction could be a result of abnormal communication between two areas of the frontal lobes linked to decision-making.  The discovery will undoubtedly stimulate clinical work on new therapies for millions of people who suffer from addiction.

The research by lead authors Dr.

Contact Information

Contact: Anita Kar
Organization: The Neuro
Email:
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Lupus drugs carry no significant cancer risk

Montreal, January 24, 2013 – People who take immunosuppressive drugs to treat lupus do not necessarily increase their cancer risk according to new research led by scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). This landmark study, which was published in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases this month, addresses long-standing fears of a link between lupus medication and cancer.
Fri, 2013-01-25 12:42

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), commonly known as lupus, is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks healthy tissue such as the skin, joints, kidneys and the brain, leading to inflammation and lesions. The disease affects about 1 in 2000 Canadians, particularly women. Previous research has suggested that lupus patients have an increased risk of developing cancer, particularly lymphoma.  Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that occurs when cells called lymphocytes, which usually help protect the body from infection and disease, begin growing and multiplying uncontrollably leading to tumor growth.

Contact Information

Contact: Julie Robert
Organization: Communications – Research, Public Affairs & Strategic Planning, McGill University Health Centre
Email:
Office Phone: 514-934-1934 (ext. 71381)
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Source Site: /newsroom