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Gene discovered to cause rare, severe neurological disease

Epileptic encephalopathy linked to protein trafficking gene
Mon, 2016-11-28 13:10

Researchers have linked a debilitating neurological disease in children to mutations in a gene that regulates neuronal development through control of protein movement within neuronal cells. 

Contact Information

Contact: Shawn Hayward
Organization: Communications Officer - Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-3376
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Source Site: /newsroom

Same gene can encode proteins with divergent functions

Research may help explain why humans have fewer genes than expected
Thu, 2016-02-11 12:07

By Cynthia Lee, McGill Newsroom

It’s not unusual for siblings to seem more dissimilar than similar: one becoming a florist, for example, another becoming a flutist, and another becoming a physicist.

Contact Information

Contact: Anne Doerr
Organization: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Email:
Office Phone: (617) 632-4090

Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations - McGill University
Office Phone: (514) 398-6754
Source Site: /newsroom

Common gene variant influences food choices

The same gene variant may lead girls to make healthy or unhealthy food choices- depending on their early socio-economic environment
Tue, 2016-02-09 15:17

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

If you’re fat, can you blame it on your genes? The answer is a qualified yes. Maybe. Under certain circumstances. Researchers are moving towards a better understanding of some of the roots of obesity.

Contact Information

Contact: Laurette Dube
Organization: McGill Centre for the Convergence of Health and Economics
Email:

Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations - McGill University
Office Phone: 514-398-2189
Source Site: /newsroom

How embryos scale vertebrae

Researchers take a step closer to decoding how cells coordinate embryonic growth
Fri, 2012-12-21 15:24

As embryos develop and grow, from a single-cell egg to a fully functional body, they must form organs that are in proportion to the overall size of the embryo. The exact mechanism underlying this fundamental characteristic, called scaling, is still unclear. But researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany, and McGill University in Montreal are one step closer to understanding it.

Contact Information

Contact: Chris Chipello
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-4201
Mobile Phone: 514-717-4201
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom