American Art

A number of artworks from the University’s Visual Arts Collection were created by renowned American artists, including Alex Katz, Frank Stella, George Gibbs, Gertrude Whitney Vanderbilt, Leonard Baskin, Roy Lichtenstein, Saul Steinberg, and the Walt Disney Studios.

 

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, The Friendship Fountain, 1913, marble

The Friendship Fountain is one of the most recognisable artworks in the Collection, and a true landmark of McGill University’s downtown campus. Created by the famed sculptor, feminist, and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875-1942), the work consists of a ten-foot marble statue and fountain featuring three nude men holding an earthen bowl. It is located in the green space in front of the Arts Building and next to the Redpath Museum.

Sculpted in 1913, as a commission for the New Arlington Hotel in Washington D.C. which ended up never being built, the work was donated to the University in 1931 at the suggestion of Ellen Ballon (1898-1969), an accomplished pianist, alumni of the McGill Schulich School of Music, and friend of Whitney (a bust of Ballon by Sir Jacob Epstein is on display in the Strathcona Music Building). The donation was intended as a symbol of amity between Canada and the United States. Though the sculpture was donated in 1931, the installation of the fountain component was not completed until 1933.

Today, the Friendship Fountain is sometimes referred to as the Good Will Fountain, the Caryatid Fountain, the Whitney Fountain, the Three Graces, and most popularly, The Three Bares. Every September, the work stands as a backdrop to Orientation Week as hundreds of students gather in the area adjacent to the fountain to enjoy live music, food, and events put on by the student-run Open Air Pub.


Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, The Friendship Fountain, 1913, marble. Gift of the artist.
 

Roy Lichtenstein, Modern Tapestry, c. 1968, wool pile. Donated by Mrs Regina Slatkin, B.A. '29 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein /SOCAN (2019)
Roy Lichtenstein, Modern Tapestry, c. 1968, wool pile. Donated by Mrs Regina Slatkin, B.A. '29 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein /SOCAN (2019)
Roy Lichtenstein, Modern Tapestry, c. 1968, wool pile

One of the numerous tapestries in the Visual Arts Collection, Modern Tapestry (c. 1968), is located on the first floor of the Arts Building, in the corridor leading to Leacock Building. Produced by Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997), the New York-born artist known for popularising pop art through his comic book style and use of Ben-Day Dots, Modern Tapestry is reflective of both modern life and industrial processes in the second half of the twentieth century. The work, through the artist’s attention to line and his distortion of space, explores the two and three-dimensional qualities of the medium.

Initially created for Modern Master Tapestries, a New York gallery which produced rugs designed by famous contemporary “masters”, the work was donated to the university by Regina Slatkin, a McGill graduate who became an important art dealer and scholar of drawings.
 

 

Leonard Baskin, Condor Bird, ca. 1960s-70s, wool pile. Donated by Mrs Regina Slatkin, B.A. '29 © The Estate of Leonard Baskin; Courtesy Galerie St. Etienne, New York.
Leonard Baskin, Condor Bird, ca. 1960s-70s, wool pile. Donated by Mrs Regina Slatkin, B.A. '29 © The Estate of Leonard Baskin; Courtesy Galerie St. Etienne, New York.
Leonard Baskin, Condor Bird, unknown date, wool pile

Leonard Baskin (1922-2000) was an American sculptor, printmaker, graphic designer, and teacher. He studied at the New York University School of Architecture and Applied Arts and at Yale University. Internationally known, he spent most of his career in the United States, with a brief period in Britain. In 1942, Baskin founded one of the first fine art presses in the United States, Gehenna Press, which ran until his death and printed over one hundred books.

This artwork, commissioned by Modern Masters Tapestries, is a wool pile tapestry based on a graphite and ink on paper drawing by the artist, also in the Collection. Birds of prey, like the condor, were amongst Baskin’s preferred subjects.

 

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