BSc(NutrSc) Dietetics Major

The BSc (Nutr Sc) Dietetics Major leads to eligibility to join a regulatory body in one of the provinces in Canada, and to be “registered” or “licensed” to practice as a dietitian.  The purpose of each provincial regulatory body is to protect the public. In Quebec, the name of the regulatory body is the Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec (OPDQ).  The Dietetics Major is recognized by OPDQ to meet the academic and internship requirements to be a registered dietitian/nutritionist in Quebec. The 3.5 year (115 credit) program includes 40 weeks of internship called "Stage”. These weeks of Stage are sequenced throughout the program starting with the first term of year 1.

This dietetic education program is accredited under the Partnership for Dietetic Education and Practice (PDEP) and prepares students for eligibility for registration with a provincial dietetics regulatory body.  All courses, including Stage, are “mapped” to ensure that the entry-to-practice standards known as the Integrated Competencies for Dietetic Education and Practice (ICDEP) are met. The ICDEP Framework consists of an interrelated set of Practice Competencies (PCs), Performance Indicators (PIs) and Foundational Knowledge statements. 

Program Vision and Mission

To improve human health and promote healthier societies by training future professional dietitian-nutritionists.

In Quebec, the two titles, dietitian and nutritionist, are protected and equivalent with respect to training background.  Dietitian-nutritionists promote health through food and nutrition in various domains including clinical nutrition care, foodservice management, and/or population and public health roles.  In Quebec, the regulatory body is the Ordre professionnels des diététistes du Québec.

Program Goals and Values

We are committed to excellence, education, collaboration and professionalism.  We meet both provincial requirements and national accreditation standards.  We strive to continuously improve our programs.  We strive to enhance dietetic practice in Canada through excellence in teaching and training of the dietitians of tomorrow.


 

Getting Started

Is the Dietetics Major for you?

If you are passionate about food, cooking, and healthy eating, then this profession may be for you!  You should have a strong science background, and enjoy communicating with others about food. You should be curious about food and nutrition, like reading scientific references, and enjoy sorting out fact from fiction.  Most dietitians enjoy trying new foods, experimenting with a new recipe or cooking, shopping for foods, growing vegetables, reading nutrition labels, uncovering facts….   these are all clues towards an interest in the field of nutrition.

What does a dietitian do?

Many dietitians work in hospitals or clinics providing nutritional advice/care for persons who have acute or chronic disease conditions.  Dietitians can also work in community agencies to help prevent disease and promote healthy eating.  Dietitians can also work in foodservice management, providing the guidance and supervision which is necessary to link safe and nutritious meals with nutritional needs.  Some dietitians work in media, marketing or communications with the food industry or other food-related businesses.  Some dietitians run their own consulting business.  The selection of opportunities for dietitians is very wide since food and nutrition touches us all in so many ways.

Language Requirements for Professional Practice (Stage)

All placement sites within the McGill network require students to have a working knowledge of both English and French.  To be eligible for most varied fieldwork experiences, students are encouraged to prepare themselves to work in both languages.  Students are expected to have a working knowledge of the French language (comprehension, spoken and basic written) by the start of clinical placements in bilingual settings (Spring of Year 2).

More information can be found in the Health Sciences calendar (PDF version) at  https://mcgill.ca/study/2017-2018/

In particular see the following sections:

Language Requirements for Professions

Language Requirements for Professions

Quebec law requires that candidates seeking admission to provincially recognized professional corporations* must be able to communicate verbally and in writing in French. To demonstrate a working knowledge of French, the professional corporation requires one of the following:

  • Evidence that you have completed three years of full-time instruction in a French post-primary school
  • A certificate that shows you completed your secondary education in Quebec in 1986 or later
  • Successful completion of a written examination set by Quebec's Office québécois de la langue française (OQLF). See below for more information.

If you are a registered student and are within two years of graduating with a degree that will give you access to a professional corporation, you can write the OQLF examination. You should contact Enrolment Services for an application form. Examinations take place every three months and may be attempted an unlimited number of times. Priority is given to students closest to graduation.

More information may be obtained from the Office québécois de la langue française, 125 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec, H2X 1X4. Telephone: 514-873-6565. Website: www.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca.

If you need to acquire a functional level of proficiency in French, you can take courses from either the French Language Centre (Faculty of Arts www.mcgill.ca/flc) or the School of Continuing Studies, 688 Sherbrooke Street West, telephone: 514-398-6200 (www.mcgill.ca/continuingstudies/area-of-study/languages).

If you are already strong in French and want to maintain or improve your proficiency, you may consider taking courses in the Department of French Language and Literature, Faculty of Arts or the School of Continuing Studies.

Note: You cannot apply non-credit language courses, and certain credit language courses, completed at the School of Continuing Studies to program/degree requirements. Consult your faculty for clarification.

* McGill degrees and diplomas currently give access to corporations regulating the activities of the following professional groups:

Professional Groups
Agrologists Lawyers
Architects Licensed General Accountants
Chartered Accountants Nurses
Chartered Appraisers Occupational Therapists
Chemists Physicians
Dentists Physiotherapists
Dietitians Psychologists
Engineers Social Workers
Geologists Speech Therapists and Audiologists
Industrial Administration Accountants Urbanists
Industrial Relations Counsellors Vocational Guidance Counsellors
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2018-2019 (last updated Aug. 16, 2018).

Language Policy

Language Policy

The main language of instruction at McGill is English. You have the right to write essays, examinations, and theses in English or in French except in courses where knowledge of a language is one of the objectives of the course.

If you need to improve your English skills, you should take an intensive course in English as a second language before or at the start of your studies. Information concerning second language course offerings can be found through the School of Continuing Studies at www.mcgill.ca/continuingstudies/area-of-study/languages and the French Language Centre at www.mcgill.ca/flc, and in Summer Studies and Continuing Studies. There are special language requirements for Faculty of Education students; see Faculty of Education.

Note for Continuing Studies: For English language programs, see Continuing Studies > Areas of Study > Languages > English Language Programs.
Note for the Faculty of Law: Due to the bilingual nature of the Law program, examinations, term papers, and essays may be written in either English or French. Participation in Moot Courts may also be in either language. While examination questions are set in the language in which a course is given, they may contain materials in either English or French.
Note for Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies: You should refer to University Regulations & Resources > Graduate > Regulations > Registration > Courses Taken as Extra to a Program.
Note for M.D.,C.M. and D.M.D. Programs:

The official language of instruction of McGill's undergraduate medical education and dental programs is English. The student is expected to have a working knowledge of the English language (comprehension, spoken, and written) from the outset of the M.D.,C.M. and D.M.D. programs. Due to early clinical exposure in bilingual settings, the student is also expected to have a working knowledge of the French language (comprehension, spoken, and basic written) from the outset of the M.D.,C.M. and D.M.D. programs.

Students are in contact with francophone patients in the teaching hospitals and may be assigned to francophone training sites for their clinical rotations. Additional language courses and workshop information is available: www.mcgill.ca/ugme/mdcm-curriculum-joint-programs/starting-our-program-what-you-need-know/language-requirements.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2018-2019 (last updated Aug. 16, 2018).

 

If I don’t currently meet the language requirements, will I be able to do so in a timely manner?

The official language of instruction at McGill is English. In accord with McGill University's Charter of Students' Rights, students have the right to submit in English or in French any written work that is graded.

Students should be aware that the official language of Quebec is French. Most of the clinical affiliation placements, including those in the greater Montreal, require proficiency in both English and French.

While French language testing is not required for entry to the Dietetics Major program, students who lack proficiency in French must avail themselves of the opportunity to take French as a second language courses and/or French immersion programs prior to or early in their program of studies.

Students who already have background of French at the elementary, high school and/or college level prior to admission to McGill, will be in a better position to be able to successfully “brush up” or improve their proficiency to a functional level in a timely manner.

Students with little or no previous background in French may need to consider adding intensive summer immersion programs and/or adding an additional year to their program in order to acquire the necessary language skills, since learning a new language can be a significant challenge while carrying a full course load in the Dietetics Major.

Immunization Requirements

A compulsory immunization program exists at McGill which is required for Dietetics students to practice. Students must complete their immunizations by the end of the first year of the Dietetics Major. The process should be initiated in the first fall semester of the first year with an appointment with our health nurse at Macdonald Campus; please be prepared to have your vaccination records available. More details will be provided in NUTR 208. See here for the McGill Health Science information site.

What do dietetic students do in their internship (Stage)?

Dietetics students participate in 3 main domains of activities:  1) Food service management, 2) Clinical Nutrition and 3) Population health or Community nutrition.  In our program there are 4 levels of Stage, and each Stage builds upon the other.  Competencies in professional practice, communication, clinical nutrition, population health and foodservice management must be successfully completed to complete the program.

Am I a registered dietitian when I complete the program in the Dietetics major?

The profession of dietetics is regulated in each province in Canada.  When you complete the program, you are eligible to register in any province in Canada.  You need to apply to the province that you wish to work in, and then be registered for that province in order to practice.  Once you are a registered in one province, you are automatically able to be registered in any other province should you choose to relocate and wish to apply to a different province.  Registered dietitians need to be able to prove that they are working in the field and staying up to date with current knowledge.  Each province’s regulatory body inspects the dietitians to ensure that the public is safe and that a high standard of professionalism is maintained.  Dietitians have a responsibility to continue to work and learn in the field of dietetics after graduation, in order to maintain their credentials and registration.

Is there a national exam in Canada to be a dietitian?

If you are applying for the first time to be a registered dietitian in the province of Quebec, there is a language requirement (see below for more information).

If you are applying for the first time to be a registered dietitian in any province except Quebec, there is an exam to write (the CDRE).  Once the CDRE has been passed, it does not need to be re-wrritten even if the registered dietitian chooses to move and to be registered in another province.

If I have taken required courses at another University, will I be able to complete the program in less time than 3.5 years?

No, due to the sequencing of the Stages at the undergraduate level, 3.5 years is the minimum amount of time that the program will take, even if course equivalency or transfer credit is given for some courses.

Program Term by Term

Required Courses: 109 credits
Complementary Courses: 3 credits
Electives: 3 credits


Required courses and Professional Practice (Stage) courses are sequenced in a specific order over 9 terms (3 ½ year program).

Advising Notes for Professional Practice (Stage):
The School firmly applies prerequisite requirements for registration in all required courses in the Dietetics Major. All required and complementary courses must be passed with a minimum grade of C.  Undergraduate registration for Professional Practice (Stage) is restricted to students in the Dietetics Major with CGPA greater than or equal to 3.0. The CGPA requirement is firmly applied.  Students in the Dietetics major who have a CGPA below 3.0 for two consecutive years will not be allowed to continue in the program.  Successful completion of each rotation of each level of Stage (Professional Practice) is required to pass that level of Stage. Each level is a prerequisite for the next level and must be passed with a minimum grade of C. If a student fails one level of stage, certain conditions will apply to have the option to repeat the stage and this may include an interview to assess suitability for the profession and potential to sucessfully complete the program. Students are reminded that ethical conduct on Professional Practice (Stage) rotations is required. The Faculty reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any student if at any time the Faculty feels the student has displayed unprofessional conduct or demonstrates incompetence.

Visiting and Special students are advised that registration in Professional Practice (Stage) courses is restricted to Dietetics major students, and due to space limitations we do not have the capacity to accept students who are not in our degree program.

Dietetics Major Summary Sheet (Fall 2018)


 

TERM BY TERM PROGRAM OF STUDY

TERM 1

LSCI 211 Biochemistry 1 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 207 Nutrition and Health 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 208 Professional Practice Stage 1A 2 CreditsSuccessful completion of all component parts of each level is a prerequisite for the next level.
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 214 Food Fundamentals 4 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 341 Global Food Security 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

Plus one Elective or Complementary (see list below)

TERM 2

ANSC 234 Biochemistry 2 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


LSCI 230 Introductory Microbiology 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 217 Application: Food Fundamentals 4 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 322 Applied Sciences Communication 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 343 Accounting and Cost Control 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

SUMMER

NUTR 209 Professional Practice Stage 1B 2 CreditsSuccessful completion of all component parts of each level is a prerequisite for the next level.
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

*See Important Dates for actual dates

 

TERM 3

AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 446 Applied Human Resources 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


ANSC 323 Mammalian Physiology 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 345 Food Service Systems Mgmt 4 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 307 Metabolism and Human Nutrition 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

TERM 4

ANSC 424 Metabolic Endocrinology 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 310 Professional Practice Stage 2A 2 CreditsSuccessful completion of all component parts of each level is a prerequisite for the next level.
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 337 Nutrition Through Life 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 344 Clinical Nutrition 1 4 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 346 Quantity Food Production 2 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

 

 

SUMMER

NUTR 311 Professional Practice Stage 2B 5 CreditsSuccessful completion of all component parts of each level is a prerequisite for the next level.
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

*See Important Dates for actual dates (May and June)

 

TERM 5

NUTR 450 Research Meth: Human Nutrition 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 505 Public Health Nutrition 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 545 Clinical Nutrition 2 4 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 546 Clinical Nutrition 3 4 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


 

Plus one Elective or Complementary (see list below)

TERM 6

NUTR 408 Professional Practice Stage 3A 1 CreditsSuccessful completion of all component parts of each level is a prerequisite for the next level.
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 409 Professional Practice Stage 3B 9 CreditsSuccessful completion of all component parts of each level is a prerequisite for the next level.
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 438 Interviewing and Counselling 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

**See Important Dates for actual dates (February to April)

 

TERM 7

NUTR 508 Professional Practice Stage 4A 7 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer


NUTR 509 Professional Practice Stage 4B 7 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

*See Important Dates for actual dates (end of August to December)

 

COMPLEMENTARY COURSES

OR a 3 credit course (200 level of higher) in human behavior social science from the following list, or another human behavior course approved by your advisor.

NUTR 301 Psychology 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

PSYC 215 Social Psychology 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

SOCI 210 Sociological Perspectives 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDPE 300 Educational Psychology 3 CreditsNot available as elective.
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

ELECTIVE COURSES

Students who need to improve their proficiency in either English or French are strongly encouraged to choose their electives for that purpose. Students who wish to take language courses should check with the English and French Language Centre, Faculty of Arts, as placement testing may be required. Students are encouraged to develop a working knowledge of French in order to optimize their participation and learning in Stage placement sites.

Elective courses need to be for credit and university level, and the content can not duplicate the content of any other course taken for the program (i.e. students will not receive credit if they take two similar courses that are considered equivalent to each other).

 



 

 

Professional Practice (Stage) Placement sites:

The School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition is responsible for organizing and securing placement sites and rotations for Stage. Students are exposed to a variety of learning environments in clinical nutrition, food service and community settings.  Students are not permitted to organize their own placement site or rotation. The specific dates for each Stage are published about one year in advance in the Important Dates on the McGill website. The School plans both undergraduate and graduate Stages at McGill teaching hospitals and other placement sites. A total of close to one thousand rotations are scheduled per year. While every effort is made to accommodate students’ preferences, the top priority lies in securing placements and rotations for all eligible students. Placement schedules are planned to meet the needs of the class as a whole, i.e. to match the learning needs of the students with the available resources, while also meeting the placement site requirements. Students will have a variety of locations throughout their four levels of Stage.  Placement schedules are subject to change. Students should expect that all or most placements/rotations will be in Quebec, with the majority in Montreal or surrounding areas.  Placements at a long distance and outside Quebec are restricted to Level 4 Stage only, if available, and some restrictions apply.

Time Commitment and Travel for Stage Level 2B NUTR 311, Level 3B NUTR 409 and Level 4 NUTR 508/509:

Students will be placed in a variety of locations.  Some locations may be convenient from a travel perspective, and some may require travel of approx. 1.5 hours for one way direction. Similarly, some locations may be easily accessed by public transport whereas some locations may have additional expenses related to travel.  The Stages are normally 8 hours per day, 5 days per week (with the exception of statutory holidays), during regular business hours (some exceptions may occasionally apply).  Students should expect approximately 1 to 3 hours homework each night. As Stage has a significant time commitment, students are advised not to engage in additional courses or part-time work (in excess of 8 hours per week) during the dates of the Stage.

Advising

Prerequisites for the first semester of Year 1:

The first Professional Practice (Stage) course, NUTR 208 Level 1a Stage, occurs in Fall of the first year.  In order to be eligible for this course, all entrance science pre-requisite or “freshman” courses must be complete prior to the Fall semester that you wish to take this course, NUTR 208. The Professional Practice (Stage) courses are carefully sequenced over the 3.5 years of the program starting with this course, and therefore if any science entrance pre-requisites are not complete it means that effectively the program will take at least one year longer, i.e. minimum 4.5 years. We therefore recommend that science entrance pre-requisites are completed in a freshman year or prior to first year.

Admission Information

Admission Information can be found in the Program Calendars, in the section that pertains to the Dietetics Major, found here.  Both the Health Sciences calendar and Undergraduate calendar contain information about the Dietetics major.

The admission requirements of science pre-requisite courses (mathematics, chemistry, biology, physics) that are required for admission to the first year of the Dietetics major for all applicants can be found at https://mcgill.ca/applying/requirements.  Students admitted from high school from other provinces or countries are usually admitted to a Freshman year (Nutrition Major) to complete these science pre-requisites or they may complete them at another university. Similarly, mature applicants who are missing science entrance prerequisites would be admitted to the Nutrition Major. If these students want to apply to year 1of the Dietetics Major, they would apply to transfer.

Freshman Year

For those who need to complete a “Freshman” year of pre-requisite science courses (mathematics, chemistry, biology and physics), consult here for more information.

Transferring to Year 1 of the Dietetics Major
Students who are already at McGill in a freshman program or another program, may apply to transfer to year 1 of the Dietetics major.  Transferring is competitive and based on the number of places available in the program. Generally speaking, a CGPA of at least 3.30 or higher is required to transfer.

Transfer/Readmission Information

For McGill students who wish to transfer to Dietetics, or students who wish to be readmitted to the Dietetics Major after a short absence, please see here for transfer and readmission guidelines and dates.

Note that senior clinical nutrition courses (Clinical Nutrition 2 and Clinical Nutrition 3) must have been completed at McGill University within 3 years prior to Level 4 Stage. Students who have had extended delays and exceed this 3 year maximum will be asked to repeat Clinical Nutrition 2 and/or 3 prior to Level 4 (NUTR 508 + NUTR 509).

Leave of Absence policy

Students registered in the Dietetics Major, who will be not registered for one or two terms should see their advisor and consult with the Student Affairs Office in Laird Hall.. These students will need to re-apply for readmission via Minerva. If any changes to the program have occurred during their absence, then a readmitted student is readmitted under the new program guidelines. 

Length of Time to complete the program

This is a professional program and therefore needs to be completed in a timely manner, in order for course content to be current and up-to-date.  Normally the program is expected to be completed in 3.5 years, and should be completed within a maximum of 5.5 years.  Any potential longer programs need to be discussed and reviewed with the University Coordinator (Stage), in order to ensure that the program meets accreditation standards.  It is not possible to complete the program in less than 3.5 years, even if transferring from another program or another university, due to the sequencing of the Stages.

Recognition of Prior Learning for Professional Practice (Stage) courses

The Stage courses are specifically sequenced to meet all competencies.  In general, it is not possible to have course equivalency exemption for any Stage courses since a variety of competencies are addressed at each level.  It may be possible to have exemption of certain weeks of Level 4 Stage, based on supervised non-paid learning/training experience that occurs after Level 3 Stage and prior to Level 4 Stage (during the Summer of U3). Confirmation needs to occur by the beginning of July for planning purposes. Consult with the University Coordinator (Stage) for more details.

Course Equivalencies

If you are in your first semester at McGill, and if you have previously done a course at another university (prior to your admission to McGill) and you wish it to be assessed for equivalency to a required or complementary course, then you need to complete an online request for course equivalency. This needs to be done before the end of the your first semester at McGill (based on Government guidelines) and includes courses for second or third year (not just first year courses). Click here for more information.

Dates for the Professional Practice (Stage)

The dates for each Stage are available/posted one year or more in advance. The Stages must be done in the scheduled dates, i.e. alternate dates are not available.  Each Stage is sequenced in a particular order and at particular dates.  It is not possible to have the Stages in a different sequence or “back-to-back”.  

Policies and procedures for Professional Practice (Stage)

Detailed policies and procedures that relate to each Level of Stage are available in each Stage manual.

Exam Deferral in a required course

Pre-requisites are firmly applied.  Courses must be successfully passed with C grade or higher.  If an exam is deferred in certain courses that directly precede a level of Stage, then the student will not be eligible to participate in Stage, and this could add one year to the program due to the sequencing of the Stages and courses.  Contact the University Coordinator (Stage) to know which courses or which semesters this would apply to.

Requests for Visiting/Special status in Professional Practice (Stage) courses

Due to limited capacity, it is not possible to provide internship, training, refreshing, upgrading or Stage to students who are not registered in the undergraduate Dietetics Major degree program or Graduate level degree.  Contact the University Coordinator (Stage) if further clarification is needed.

Professional Practice

What is Professional Practice (Stage) in Dietetics?

For students in the Dietetics Major, a 40 week internship is integrated in the program, to meet requirements for eligibility to register with provincial regulatory bodies as a registered dietitian. “Stage” is the French word for internship. The Stages are integrated and sequenced throughout the program, starting with fall of year 1. There are four Levels of Stage.

Is it possible to enter a freshman program in the Dietetics major?

No, the freshman courses, for students who need to do a freshman year, are only available in the Nutrition Major.  This is because the Dietetics major is a professional program and admission is based on marks achieved in the entrance science courses (or freshman science courses or equivalent Quebec CEGEP science courses),

What will I do in Level 1a (NUTR 208) and Level 1b (NUTR 209) Stage? When do these Stages occur?

The first Level of Stage occurs mainly on campus. Level 1a Stage occurs in the fall of first year. In this Stage, students are introduced to professional practice. The Stage includes field trips and visits to hospital sites.

Level 1b Stage occurs in May/June after first year. In this Stage, students have the opportunity to practice interviewing and teaching normal nutrition at the Arnold and Blema Steinberg McGill Medical Simulation center. They also participate in a variety of nutrition education activities.

What will I do in the other Levels of Stage?

Levels 2, 3 and 4 occur at a variety of placement sites in Quebec. The majority of the placements are on the Island of Montreal in hospital, geriatric or community centres. Placements provide exposure to Clinical Nutrition, Management and Community nutrition. Because the Stages are divided into 4 levels, students get to see a variety of placement sites, since normally they are placed in different sites for every level of Stage. In the clinical nutrition rotations, students are involved in individualized care for patients who require specialized therapeutic diets for their medical condition. In management rotations, students participate in projects and learn about practical applications of food and nutrition in both traditional (hospital) and non-traditional (community) settings. In community rotations, students are exposed to working with groups to promote healthy nutrition.

Are there opportunities for Stage in other provinces in Canada or other countries?

Yes, but this would only occur for a portion of the last Stage, Level 4, and further details are discussed once students are within about 6 months of the final Stage. Opportunities in other provinces are limited, and we cannot guarantee that a rotation in another province will be secured. We have some international opportunities in the Caribbean and Africa that are available for those students who are interested. Students need to pay certain costs for these international opportunities (such as travel and accommodation).

Can I find my own placement, or does the University arrange the placements for Stage?

The university arranges the placements, and students are not permitted to arrange placements themselves. Students complete their preferences prior to each Stage, and while it is not possible to meet all preference requests, the majority of students do get many of their preferences met at certain points over the course of the program.

FAQs

Where can I go with a Dietetics degree? Where do dietitians/nutritionists work?

  • As a clinical nutritionist/counsellor in health care settings (42%, OPDQ 2000)

    • in medical or surgical units
    • in nephrology, endocrinology and gastroenterology
    • in oncology and immunology
    • in geriatrics, etc.

    You will assess the nutritional health of individuals and plan, implement and evaluate nutrition interventions as a member of the health care team.

  • As a food service manager (9.6% , OPDQ 2000)

    • in residential centres, hospitals, seniors' homes, prisons and schools
    • in sports centres, cafeterias and companies

    Organizing and managing the food system, from planning food purchase standards and nutritionally adequate menus to staff education, budget management and marketing will challenge your time and personnel management skills.

  • As a community nutritionist (10.3%, OPDQ 2000)

    • in a CLSC, school board, health club
    • in community clinics
    • in international settings

    Teaching individuals and groups about meeting their specific nutrient needs and monitoring their nutrition wellness will be your main goal.

  • As researchers and teachers (6.2%, OPDQ 2000)

    Dietitian-nutritionists capitalize on an advanced degree and study all the varied aspects of nutrition from the level of the cell to nutritional status of populations.

  • As communications, public relations and marketing specialists (4%, OPDQ 2000)

    In food and nutrition with food companies and medical enterprises you will use your food and nutrition knowledge to promote specially formulated nutrition products, advocate on behalf of people with special nutrition needs, or develop educational materials for the public.

  • In combination food and nutrition positions (8.4%, OPDQ 2000)

    • in private practice
    • in government
    • in product development
    • in public education

    The dietitian-nutritionist is a food and nutrition consultant to physicians, food scientists, teachers, community workers and others, synthesizing nutrition science for application by the public.

Where do I find the list of courses to take?

Look under the Tab “Program term by term” on this page
 

I can’t register on Minerva for NUTR 208 (Professional Practice Stage 1a), what should I do?

For NUTR 208, which is the first Stage course in Fall of U1, instructor approval is required. You need to e-mail the instructor, sandy.phillips [at] mcgill.ca with your ID number and requesting permission to register. 
 

How will I be notified once I can register for NUTR 208?

We will always use your McGill e-mail to communicate with you, so be sure to check your McGill e-mail and use that e-mail for communication.
 

I’m having trouble registering for my courses, what should I do?

If you can't register for any courses, then call Ms. Fern Ship at the Student Affairs office at 514 398 7859 and she will help sort out the problem.  If you can’t register for one particular course, like Biochem 1, you may also need to call Fern Ship, see above number.
 

When will I get an advisor?

You will be assigned an advisor to help answer your questions, but sometimes at the beginning of the session the advisor has not been assigned yet. Your advisor may not be assigned until July.
 
 
 

How many credits do I need to be full-time?

Twelve (12) credits is full-time. You may take up to 18 credits in one semester. Most students take 15 or 17 credits per semester.
 

What happens if a required course is full when I want to register for it?

Contact your advisor who will verify that you need the course, and then most likely the capacity of the course will be increased to allow you to register.
 

What happens if there is a timetable conflict between courses or labs?

If the conflict is with a non-required course, or a course from a different year that you wish to take in advance, then you would drop the non –required course or the optional course that you don’t need yet. If the conflict is between required courses of the same year, then normally the conflict gets sorted out during the first week of class, since students must be able to take the required courses of that particular year.
 

If I follow the term-by-term plan of courses, do I need to take the electives and complementary as shown?

Some students delay taking electives in order to keep their schedule lighter or because they can’t find a course that easily fits their schedule. Since the electives are not required for Stage, it is possible to delay if you wish. The complementary NUTR 301 is currently a winter course, and fits best into U2 (or freshman year for freshman students).
 

What can I take for my elective courses?

Generally speaking, the choice for your elective is quite liberal. Elective courses are either courses of interest to you or they are language courses if you need to improve your English or French. Elective choice is flexible, and can depend on one fits your timetable best and when you wish to take the course. The topic should not duplicate another course you need to take in the program.

How can I find an elective?

If you want the course on the Macdonald campus, then select the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and select the term you wish, and scroll through the list of courses to see which ones you have the pre-requisites for and which would fit your timetable.
 

Can I take a 100 level elective course?

Yes, as long as it does not have too much overlap with any other required courses or entrance pre-requisites. Some students take some of the CHEM 18X courses in the downtown campus (these classes are also taped), ex World of Food/Chemistry/Medications.
 

Can I take a 500 level elective course?

500 level couress are for senior undergraduate students and graduate students and should be taken only in your final undergraduate year.
 

Can I take a 100 level complementary course?

No, it is not permitted to have 100 level complementary course. Most students take NUTR 301 Psychology, or some other type of human behaviour oriented course.
 

Can I take my electives or complementary course at another university or online or in the summer?

Yes. For courses at another Quebec university, check with the Student Affairs office about how to register.
 

Useful websites and contact info

The School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition is located in the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences on the Macdonald campus in Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec.

 

Student Affairs Office: 514 398 7925

My McGill : This website is for students enrolled at McGill and links you to many important sites. For the Main McGill homepage at www.mcgill.ca, scroll down to “Popular Tools” and click on My McGill. You will also see links to e-mail, Minerva, etc, but the My McGill site pulls all these tools together in one place. If you are a McGill student, always use your McGill e-mail for communication.

For prospective students thinking of coming to the Mac campus for one of our programs www.mcgill.ca/macdonald/prospective/applying

Essential info for new students www.mcgill.ca/macdonald/studentinfo

Admissions information and Guides https://mcgill.ca/applying/requirements/university.  Click on the section that would apply to you, for your background.

A table outlining some equivalent Math and Science pre-requisite courses from CEGEPS and Universities www.mcgill.ca/mathscitable

For students interested in the undergraduate degree in BSc (Nutr Sc) Dietetics Major. This is the professional program leading to eligibility to become a registered dietitian. A Term by Term outline of courses can be found. Also answers to some FAQs.

A graduate program, MSc Applied in Human Nutrition. Outlines the possibility of including credentialing to be a dietitian. This program is of interest to those who have a previous related undergraduate degree.

The program for Nutrition Major. This program has several options and many useful links and FAQs.

Useful forms, such as course equivalency form www.mcgill.ca/macdonald/studentinfo/undergrads/forms

Important dates for McGill students to know www.mcgill.ca/importantdates

Information about placement tests for French language courses www.mcgill.ca/flc/prospective-students/placement-tests

 

Photos


Class of 2017-2018


Class of 2016


Class of 2015


Class of 2014