Doctoral & Post-Doctoral Fellows

aimee.castro2 [at] mail.mcgill.ca (Aimee Castro)

Aimee Castro is a graduate of McGill University’s direct-entry Master of Science (Applied) in Nursing program. Aimee will begin her doctoral studies at McGill’s Ingram School of Nursing in September 2018. She has a Master of Arts in Health and Aging from McMaster University where her research explored nurses’ uses of social media. Aimee has a Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacology with a Management minor from McGill University. Aimee has worked as a home health care provider and as an entrepreneur. Her research interests lie at the intersections of nursing, caregiving, and technology. She hopes to contribute to the research and development of technologies that support informal and formal caregivers.

Areas of interest

  • Caregiving
  • Informal caregiving
  • Technologies in healthcare
  • Health care administration
  • Qualitative research methodologies

Supervisor(s)

  • Dr. Argerie Tsimicalis, RN, PhD: Dr. Tsimicalis is an Assistant Professor in the Ingram School of Nursing with an Associate Member Status in the Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University. Dr. Tsimicalis has an appointment as a Nurse Scientist at Shriners Hospitals for Children-Canada
  • Dr. Antonia Arnaert, RN, PhD: Dr. Arnaert is an Associate Professor at the Ingram School of Nursing. She is also an Associate Member of the Department of Oncology, and a Faculty Member of the McGill Programs in Whole-Person Care. She is an Associate Member of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Community Studies at St. Mary's Hospital Centre and a Nurse Researcher at the Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital. Dr. Arnaert is also a Chercheur Régulier, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation Greater Montreal. She is also a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium.
 

lydia.ouldbrahim [at] mail.mcgill.ca (Lydia Ould Brahim) 

Lydia Ould Brahim a PhD student in Nursing and registered nurse with a BASc in Environmental and Political Science (McGill University) and MSc in Nursing (McGill University). Her research interests lie primarily in the domain of mental health with a focus on caregivers and self-management. Her current research centers on adapting and pilot testing a self-management depression intervention for people with chronic illness and their caregivers. She has contributed to a number of research projects related to self-management of depression and addressing the needs of caregivers. She has also conducted research aiming to improve mental health care for inpatients with dual diagnoses.

Areas of interest

  • Mental health
  • Chronic illness support
  • Self-management
  • Caregiver support

Supervisor(s)

  • Dr. Sylvie Lambert, PhD, RN, Canada Research Chair, Assistant Professor McGill University

monica.parmar [at] mail.mcgill.ca (Monica Parmar)

Monica P. Parmar is a doctoral candidate in the Ingram School of Nursing and a Nursing Counsellor in the Cancer Nutrition Rehabilitation Program in the Segal Cancer Centre at the Jewish General Hospital. She is also a part-time Adjunct Faculty Member in the Ingram School of Nursing and an adult palliative care researcher for Palliative Care McGill.
Monica is specialized in cancer care nursing with a focus on rehabilitation and palliative care for patients with advanced cancer and cachexia. Her doctoral research focuses on how interprofessional health care professionals work as a team with patients and their families to provide evidence-based tailored interventions for patients with advanced cancer and cachexia in the context of standard oncology and palliative care. Her other research interests include interprofessional practice, program evaluation and the improvement of cancer and palliative care interventions and services.

Areas of interest

  • Cancer care/oncology
  • Cancer cachexia
  • Interprofessional practice
  • Palliative care
  • Program evaluation

Supervisor(s)

  • Dr. S. Robin Cohen, Research Director and Full Professor, Division of Palliative Care, Departments of Oncology and Medicine, McGill University; Investigator, Lady Davis Institute for Research, Jewish General Hospital; Associate Member of the Ingram School of Nursing; Associate Member of the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology​

marianne.sofronas [at] mcgill.ca (Marianne Sofronas)

Marianne is a faculty lecturer and doctoral student at McGill University’s Ingram School of Nursing. Her academic background is in medical anthropology and nursing. She graduated with an MA in anthropology from The New School for Social Research in New York, NY. Under the supervision of Drs. Rayna Rapp and Veena Das, she studied voice, silence, consent and agency among women institutionalized for mental illness. Since graduating with an MSc in Nursing from McGill in 2010, Marianne has practiced as a nurse clinician in the Intensive Care Unit of the Montreal Neurological Hospital, and has received Canadian Nurses’ Association specialty certifications in neuroscience and critical care nursing. Her research interests are in nursing ethics, neuroscience nursing, neuropalliative care, critical care, and qualitative methodologies. Supervised by Drs. Franco Carnevale and David Wright, Marianne’s doctoral research is an ethnography of end-of-life decision-making among patients with neurologic illness.

Areas of interest

  • Ethics
  • Neuroscience nursing
  • Neuropalliative care
  • Critical care nursing

Supervisor(s)

  • Dr. Franco Carnevale RN, PhD, Professor, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University
  • Dr. David Wright, Assistant Professor, Co-Director of the Nursing Palliative Care Research and Education Unit, University of Ottawa

jacqueline.vanwijlen [at] mail.mcgill.ca (Jacqueline van Wijlen) 

Jacqueline is a graduate of St. Francis Xavier University (BScN with Adv. Major, 2012), Dalhousie University (MN-NP: Family/All-Ages, 2016) and a current PhD student at McGill University in the Ingram School of Nursing. The focus of her PhD research will be a qualitative exploration of breastfeeding support in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) through the perspective of mothers and nurses using a feminist poststructural lens. 
Her nursing practice career began in Pediatric Intensive Care before transitioning into Neonatal Intensive Care where Jacqueline worked until completing her Masters in Nursing. In conjunction with her PhD studies, Jacqueline currently holds a tenure-track position in the Rankin School of Nursing at St. Francis Xavier University, teaching courses in research methods, pharmacology, maternal-child and family health and wellness.
Jacqueline has spent much of her time both as a student nurse as well as during her RN career involved in a leadership capacity with Nursing the Future and subsequently, the Nova Scotia Transition Facilitation Network, providing New Graduate nursing support.

Areas of interest

  • Pediatric, adolescent & maternal-newborn health
  • Family health & primary care
  • Transition to professional practice/new graduate nursing transition

Supervisor(s)

  • Dr. Sonia Semenic, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor; PhD Program Director, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University

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