News

Annual Liver Metastasis Research Network Meeting

June 10-11, 2013

Group photo from the Liver Metastasis Research Network meeting at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal QC, CanadaThis year's Annual Liver Metastasis Research Network Meeting took place June 10-11, 2013 at McGill University Health Centre, in the beautiful city of Montréal, Canada. Representatives of all members of the network and several new members were present. It became an enthusiastic, inspiring and productive meeting with an overview of the status of research projects in the different labs and several very lively and open round table discussions on the future of our network.

The network adopted a new mission statement: Multidisciplinary International Network with shared expertise, resources and projects to uncover the molecular mechanisms of cancer liver metastases for the benefit of patients.

[View the program]








AmorChem invests in a potential therapy for late-stage breast cancer

December 10, 2013 

AmorChem gladly announces a new investment in a project focused on the work of Dr. Pnina Brodt, professor in the Departments of Surgery, Medicine and Oncology at McGill University and a researcher of the Cancer Axis at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). The project will be conducted in collaboration with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and builds on past collaborative efforts. [Read press release]

January 14, 2014

AmorChem is investing in a project focused on the work of Dr. Pnina Brodt, professor in the Departments of Surgery, Medicine and Oncology at McGill University and a researcher of the Cancer Axis at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC).

Dr. Brodt’s work centers on the use of the TRAP technology to inhibit the activity of the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), by preventing its binding to its natural ligands, IGF-1 and IGF-2.

The project will be conducted in collaboration with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and builds on past collaborative efforts.

Dr. Brodt has been a leader in identifying the important role of the IGF axis in cancer development, invasion and metastasis, and her team’s work in this field is internationally recognized. Her work has led to the development of several strategies for blocking the IGF axis including, most recently, the bio-engineering of a soluble IGF-Trap that is currently being developed as an anti-cancer drug candidate.

Design of the IGF-Trap was refined through collaborative work with NRC, whose protein engineering and production expertise delivered through its biologics program will continue to play an important role in the project.

“Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is recognized today as a validated anti-cancer target, but no satisfactory targeting agent has been developed to date,” says Elizabeth Douville, general partner at AmorChem. “Dr. Brodt’s technology will have clear advantages over existing strategies because it targets the ligands of the IGF-1R without binding insulin. Moreover, Dr. Brodt has generated very compelling data in animal models of lung, colon and breast cancer.”

The IGFs are involved in mammalian growth and development. IGF-1 is essential for many of the growth promoting effects of growth hormone and is involved in the development of normal breast tissue. IGF-1 has been implicated in breast carcinogenesis and was shown to be both anti-apoptotic and pro-mitogenic. It is expected that a decoy receptor (the IGF-Trap) would greatly impact the levels of bio available IGF-1 and IGF-2 at tumour sites, thereby blocking the ir proliferative/anti-apoptotic effects on the cancer cells. [Source: Biotechnology Focus]