cystic fibrosis

Half of all CF patients in Canada do not live to see the age of 34, and these are the best results in the world. Treatment is complex, requiring a daily routine that includes consuming many pills and physical therapy that can take up to two hours per day.

Robert’s case shows why it is high time we had newborn screening for CF in Quebec. - Montreal Gazette

 

You may read the entire article HERE.

Classified as: cystic fibrosis, screen, screening, Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre, cf
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Published on: 10 May 2017

Dr. Larry Lands, Professor and Division Director of Respiratory Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics, was recently awarded a grant from the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation of $192,000 over 2 years to continue his work on rhinovirus infection in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells. For more information on Dr. Lands research please visit Meakins-Christie Laboratories.

Dr. Lands was also appointed as Chair of Cystic Fibrosis Canada's Research Advisory Council in February 2017.

Classified as: pediatrics, cystic fibrosis, respiratory medicine
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Published on: 27 Mar 2017

Once again the Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre (CFTRc) team from McGill University participated in the annual Walk to Make Cystic Fibrosis History. As a nation, Canada raised $3 million dollars and counting for Cystic Fibrosis research and care. 

Classified as: Research, cystic fibrosis, Fundraiser, Team, Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre
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Published on: 31 May 2016

For McGill scientists specializing in protein-traffi cking diseases such as cystic fi brosis (CF), October 17, 2011 marked a monumental event with the opening of McGill’s Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre (CFTRc) in the McIntyre Medical Sciences Building. Celebrated by a one-day symposium highlighting McGill’s proven strengths in this research area, the Centre brings society one step closer to eradicating CF. 

 

Read the whole article HERE.

Classified as: Research, cystic fibrosis, physiology, presentation, talk, Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre
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Published on: 27 May 2016

Gergely Lukacs, from the Department of Physiology, talks about cystic fibrosis, a paradigm of conformational diseases. A "Soup and Science" presentation.

 

Watch the whole presentation on YouTube HERE.

Classified as: cystic fibrosis, presentation, talk, Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre
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Published on: 27 May 2016

David Thomas, professor and chair in the Department of Biochemistry at McGill University addresses progress in molecular biology and the latest strategies for tackling genetic disease. 

 

Watch the whole episode HERE.

Classified as: Research, cystic fibrosis, External, Research News, Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre
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Published on: 27 May 2016

Dr. John Hanrahan, of the Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre (CFTRc) from McGill University, appeared on CTV news to explain that a new treatment for the genetic disease is derived from sea sponges.

 

View the whole interview HERE.

Classified as: Research, cystic fibrosis, interview, Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre
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Published on: 27 May 2016

Cystic fibrosis is caused by a mutation in the gene that encodes a particular protein, known as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (or CFTR). Although this discovery was made 25 years ago and the lives of those with the disease have been extended, there is still no effective cure for the disease. Now new information about the nature of the most common form of mutation in the CFTR gene, gathered by a research team led by Dr. Gergely Lukacs of the Department of Physiology at McGill University, offers exciting new avenues for improving the treatment of the disease.

Classified as: genetics, cystic fibrosis
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Published on: 8 Jul 2013

A team of researchers at the Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre at McGill University and the University of British Columbia (UBC) have uncovered a new molecule for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common fatal genetic diseases. The researchers discovered the chemical from a remarkable source, a marine sponge from the South Pacific Ocean. The researchers found that the chemical corrects the localization and restores the function of the defective protein that causes CF. Their findings are published in the current issue of the journal Chemistry and Biology.

Classified as: cystic fibrosis
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Published on: 25 Oct 2012