Instructor Activities

Thursday, November 8th, 2018

4:30-6pm

McLennan Library Building, rm MS-10 (Basement)

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

Incorporating Student-Produced Videos in Foreign Language Teaching: A Pilot Application of YouSeeU

Alejandra Barriales-Bouche and Sun-Young Kim, Faculty Lecturers

Videos have gained an increasingly dominant presence in everyday life, especially because of the widespread accessibility to technology. How can we use student-produced videos efficiently in foreign language education? What instructional tools are available to incorporate videos in the classroom easily? This workshop highlights the use of the application YouSeeU that allows students to create and share their own videos with their classmates and instructor(s) through myCourses (McGill’s Learning Management System). Based on a one-year pilot application of YouSeeU in McGill German and Spanish elementary-to-advanced language courses, this workshop will 1) explore the pedagogical benefits of using simple student-produced videos in the foreign language classroom, 2) present a sample of activities that demonstrate different uses of the application in language teaching, 3) address evaluation methods, and 4) discuss student feedback on the use of this program. In the second half of this workshop, participants will get a hands-on introduction to YouSeeU. Computers and demo accounts will be available during the workshop. No advanced registration required.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Alejandra Barriales-Bouche received her Ph.D. in Hispanic Literatures and Linguistics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 2003. She was Associate Professor of Spanish at Suffolk University (Boston, USA). She also taught at Mount Holyoke College and Concordia University. She has been a Faculty Lecturer in Spanish in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at McGill since 2012. In the field of language teaching methodology, her interests include the use of technology in language courses and the integration of culture and literature in language classes. 

Dr. Sun-Young Kim earned her Ph.D. in German Studies at the University of Michigan. Before joining the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at McGill in 2012, she taught German at the University of Toronto, York, University of Michigan and Kalamazoo College. Her interests in the field of language pedagogy include teaching literature in language courses and integrating technology in language classes.  


 

Thursday, April 5th, 2018

4:30-6pm

McLennan Library Building, rm MS-10 (Basement)

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

The potential of Thinglink virtual reality tool for second language learning

Kevin Papin, Faculty Lecturer

Information and communication technologies (ICT) have been the focus of extensive research in the field of second language (L2) acquisition (Chapelle, 2007). However, in the recent years, the emergence of virtual reality (VR) as a technology accessible to the general public has provided researchers with a new field of study and experimentation. VR can be defined as an immersive digital environment similar to the real world, giving the user the feeling of being there (Schroeder, 2008). We usually distinguish between two types of VR (Schwienhorst, 1998): hard VR (using head-mounted displays) and desktop VR (relying on 360 photos or videos displayed on a computer, tablet or phone screen). Recently, online platforms like RoundMe or Thinglink have started to offer user-friendly VR creation tools.

 

This workshop explores the potential of Thinglink (more specifically Thinglink 360) for the creation of engaging tasks for Montreal-based classrooms. Participants will also take part in a hands-on activity and will be encouraged to reflect on the potential use of Thinglink for their classroom activities. 

BIOGRAPHY

Kevin Papin received his Master’s degree in Linguistics and Second Language Teaching in 2011. He has taught French as a second language in several universities in Quebec and Ontario. He joined the French Language Centre of McGill University in 2016. His research interests include the impact of ICT on willingness to communicate and raising awareness of sexual diversity in an educational context.


 

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

4:30-5:30pm

McLennan Library Building, rm MS-10 (Basement)

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

Using media in second language advanced course

Dr. Pouneh Shabani-Jadidi, Senior Lecturer

The aim of this paper is threefold: 1) to discuss the acquisition particularities of the advanced level students, 2) to study the use of content-based - in this case media material - in teaching advanced level students, and 3) to investigate the impact of teaching such material on the students’ writing ability and overall proficiency. The content-based material that has been studied in this paper is media, in general and newspapers, in particular. I will begin by discussing various relevant topics, including the analysis of advanced level students’ language acquisition as far as language processing is concerned. In addition, I will discuss how the use of media, and in particular newspapers, as the main material in an advanced course will impact students’ writing skill and overall proficiency level.

BIOGRAPHY

Pouneh Shabani-Jadidi is Senior Lecturer in Persian Language and Linguistics and Head of Persian Language Program at the Institute of Islamic Studies, McGill University. She holds a PhD in Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2012) and a PhD in Applied Linguistics from Tehran Azad University (2004). She has taught Persian language and linguistics as well as Persian literature and translation at McGill University, the University of Oxford, the University of Chicago, and Tehran Azad University since 1997. 

 

 


 

Learning Branch Workshop Poster

Friday, October 27th, 2017

12:30-2:30pm

McLennan Library Building, rm MS-37 (Basement)

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

Task-based language teaching: the added-value of Learning Branch

Kevin Papin and Alida Soucé, Faculty Lecturers

Since the 90s, task-based language teaching (e.g. Ellis, 2003) has become the central paradigm in second language acquisition. Revolving around the notion of communicative task (Nunan, 1991), this approach aims at fostering L2 communication by placing the learner in authentic communicative situations relevant to real-life needs. Research findings feature a wide range of means to reach that goal. Those include the use of ICT, which help to create authentic simulations in which each learner can progress at his/her own pace.

Learning Branch is an online platform that has the potential to enhance language learning, due to its ability to easily adapt to task-based approach. This workshop will explore the technical functionalities of this new tool and suggest practical applications to teach second languages in McGill university’s context. We will also engage in a group discussion on the creation of meaningful activities within the task-based framework. 

BIOGRAPHIES

K. Papin

Kevin Papin received his Master’s degree in Linguistics and Second Language Teaching in 2011. He has taught French as a second language in several universities in Quebec and Ontario. He joined the French Language Centre of McGill University in 2016. His research interests include the impact of ICT on willingness to communicate and raising awareness of sexual diversity in an educational context.

Read more about Kevin.

A. Soucé

Since 2013, Alida Soucé coordinates and teaches the “Near Beginners” and “Elementary” levels at the French Language Centre at McGill University. She received a Master’s degree in Second and Foreign Languages Pedagogy” from University of Strasbourg, France. Her major focused on “Multimedia pedagogical creation for languages” and ICT. She coded “Carte d’affaires”, a pedagogical and intercultural website for Simon Fraser University students seeking a job in France or in Quebec. Her main research interests are second and foreign languages acquisition, the creative uses of ICT and the exploration of task-based and intercultural approaches in languages teaching.

 

 

 


Thursday, March 16th, 2017

4-5:30pm

McLennan Library Building, rm MS-37 (Basement)

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

Making Your Class Click: Exploring the Use of Student Response Systems in Foreign Language Teaching

Dr. Alejandra Barriales Bouche

Student response systems (SRS, previously known as clickers) are increasingly common in higher-education institutions. Despite their growing popularity, the use of SRS in language classes is still scarce. This workshop will explore the pedagogical benefits of using SRS in the foreign language classroom. It will present a sample of activities that show how SRS can be used for a variety of purposes in language teaching and it will discuss student feedback on the use of Polling @ McGill in Spanish courses. Participants in this workshop will get a hands-on introduction to web-based polling systems, such as TurningPoint Cloud. McGill participants interested in designing their own polls can register their TurningPoint account in advance.* Computers will be available during the workshop.

* To register your TurningPoint account, go to http://kb.mcgill.ca/it/easylink/article.html?id=1557 and follow the instructions on “Step 1” under “How to request/access” (heading “Instructors”).

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Alejandra Barriales-Bouche received her Ph.D. in Hispanic Literatures and Linguistics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 2003. She was Associate Professor of Spanish at Suffolk University (Boston, USA). She also taught at Mount Holyoke College and Concordia University. She has been a Faculty Lecturer in Spanish in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at McGill since 2012.

Read more about Alejandra.

 

 


Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

4-6pm

Room MS-74 of the McLennan Library Building

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

Strategies to Support Learning Language in Context

Dr. Carolyn Samuel

Have you ever wondered how to address vocabulary questions from students that have no simple explanation, such as when a certain preposition should be used? Have students ever expressed to you the frustration they feel when a dictionary or a thesaurus can’t help them with appropriate vocabulary use? These, and related questions, will be addressed in a two-hour workshop designed to raise participants’ awareness of how to support students of different proficiency levels with learning language in context.

You will be introduced to vocabulary building strategies by experiencing an abbreviated language “class” taught by the workshop facilitator. Then, you will work in pairs or small groups to design and discuss possible applications of the strategies for use with your students. Emphasis will be on teaching and learning collocations, and using a concordancer—a software tool that can support students in becoming independent and “critical thinking” language learners. Ideally, one person in each pair or small group will have a laptop or tablet with internet connection, but participants who are not online will still be able to actively engage with the workshop material. By the end of the workshop, you will be able to:

  • Describe the concept of “collocation” for your students.
  • Use a concordancer to search corpora (bodies of language) for collocation examples.
  • Interpret quantitative and qualitative search results.

The workshop will be held in Room MS-74 of the McLennan Library Building. From the Service Point entrance at 3415 McTavish, pass the reception desk and continue down the long hallway. Where the hallway comes to a “T”, turn right. MS-74 is the first room on the right.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Carolyn Samuel is an award-winning instructor who has taught ESL and EFL for over 20 years at universities abroad and in Canada, including McGill University, where she is now an Educational Developer with Teaching and Learning Services. Carolyn’s teaching interests are in pronunciation, corpus linguistics, and pedagogically sound uses of technology to support student learning; her research addresses university instructors’ perceptions of their ability to teach in their second or other language. Read more about Carolyn.

 

 


Thursday, November 10th, 2016

4pm

McLennan Library Building, rm MS-37 (Basement)

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

Task-Based Language Teaching: What Research Says About How It Can be Implemented in the Classroom

Gabriel Michaud

Task-based Language Teaching (TBLT) has been attracting a lot of attention in recent years, both from a research and a practical point of view. Briefly put, the goal of TBLT is learning through communicative tasks that are relevant to second language learners. This workshop aims to present the theoretical foundations of this approach while giving practical ways of implementing TBLT in the classroom.

BIOGRAPHY

Gabriel Michaud is a Faculty Lecturer at the French Language Centre where he teaches Advanced and Intermediate level courses. Prior to that, he taught French at l’Université de Montréal. His research interests include task-based language teaching, integrated focus on form, curriculum design and cross-cultural communication. He is currently working on a PhD on the integration of focus on form in a task-based language classroom.

 

 


Thursday, October 27th, 2016

2:30pm to 4pm

McLennan Library Building, rm MS-37 (Basement)

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

Processes and Products of Technology- Enhanced Project-Based Language Learning (TEPBLL)

Dr. Liudmila Klimanova

This talk will discuss the potential for Technology-Enhanced Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL) and Project-Based Telecollaboration (PBT) to transform foreign language education. PBLL's intersections with content-based instruction, task-based language learning, and performance assessment make it an ideal conduit to ground foreign language teaching on real life tasks and measurable learning outcomes.

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Liudmila Klimanova, a faculty lecturer in Russian Studies at the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. Her research program focusses on identity enactment in virtual social environments, project-based and task-based language teaching, and second language development through the use of social technology. Among her other areas of expertise are proficiency- oriented foreign language teaching and testing. Dr. Klimanova is co-director of LinguaExchange, a telecollaborative partnership program for learners of Russian based at Loyola University Chicago.

 

 


Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

4h30pm to 6pm

McLennan Library Building, rm MS-37 (Basement)

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

Les outils du Web 2.0 en classe de langues : pourquoi et comment les intégrer ?

Web 2.0 Tools in the Language Classroom: Why and How to Use Them?

Sarah Anthony et Prisca Fenoglio

La présentation se fera en français. We welcome questions and discussions in English.

Ni obligation ni évidence, encore assez peu incorporé dans la formation formelle mais sujet bien présent dans la littérature scientifique actuelle, l’utilisation des outils du Web 2.0 en classe de langues soulève des interrogations légitimes, telles que pourquoi et comment les intégrer ? On est ainsi en droit de se demander ce qu’ils apportent à l’enseignement et à l’apprentissage des langues. Inspirées par la notion qu’ « educational innovations that shape classroom practice [are linked] to heightened forms of engagement and, in turn, to student persistence » (Tinto,     « Research and Practice », p. 5), nous nous intéressons à évaluer l’impact de l’intégration des outils du Web 2.0 sur la motivation des enseignants et des apprenants et sur les apprentissages de ceux-ci.

Nous détaillerons lors de notre atelier plusieurs manières d’intégrer des outils du Web 2.0, et nous inviterons les participant(e)s à en utiliser certains. Ces propositions d’intégration ont pour objectifs, par exemple, de favoriser la créativité, la collaboration, le partage et l’ouverture à l’autre. Nous parlerons aussi des situations inattendues auxquelles peuvent être confrontés les enseignants dans leur utilisation de ces outils et donnerons quelques conseils pratiques.

BIOGRAPHIES

Depuis août 2013, Sarah Anthony enseigne au CEF à l’Université McGill. Ses domaines de recherche sont variés; elle s’intéresse notamment à la littérature française contemporaine et à la pédagogie du français langue seconde. Ses travaux les plus récents en pédagogie portent sur la créativité comme outil de motivation, sur l'apprentissage expérientiel et sur l'utilisation stratégique de nouvelles technologies en classe de FLS.

Professeure de FLS et conceptrice de ressources pédagogiques en ligne, Prisca Fenoglio travaille depuis 2001 à McGill et depuis 2008 au Centre d’enseignement du français. Par sa formation et sa pratique, elle s’intéresse en particulier à l’usage des TICE pour l’enseignement du FLS. Elle explore actuellement la place des émotions et de la créativité dans l’apprentissage médiatisé par les technologies et le potentiel du Web 2.0 comme outil de collaboration et de motivation.

 

 


Friday, March 11th, 2016

1:30pm to 3pm

McLennan Library Building, rm MS-37 (Basement)

3459 McTavish St.

For more information, please contact: natallia.liakina [at] mcgill.ca

The media and the message: what does the educational technology mean to us, the language teaching community?

Bill Wang

Half a century ago, when Marshall McLuhan formulated such concepts as “the medium is the message” and “media is the extension of human body,” he inspired many to think more critically and philosophically about the nature of media or technology in relation to human society and the impact of the then relatively new, electronic media such as radio and television on our living experience. Today, as computer-based and Internet supported educational technology continues to advance at an unprecedented speed, it is time for us, the language teachers, to think about the technological impact on our teaching and learning. In this talk I’d like to ask and discuss these questions: how have we been affected by educational technology in our teaching so far? Are the technological impacts or potentials merely manifested in the enhancements of specific pedagogical effectiveness? Will applications of the educational technology gradually or even inevitably change our conceptions of and approaches to language teaching and learning?  If so, how? It is impossible, of course, to answer all these questions fully, given the limited time and insufficient knowledge we have so far in understanding the media – the new educational technology. However, it is important to think about these questions so that we can be better prepared as teachers in the era of technological revolution. We shall not be left behind.

BIOGRAPHY

Bill Wang joined McGill to teach Chinese courses in 1997. As a Chinese professor he also taught at the University of Calgary for two years and the University of British Columbia for two years. He did his graduate studies in communication and media studies at the University of Calgary and pursued his doctoral studies at the University of British Columbia. His current research interests include e-learning Chinese, motivations for learning Chinese, and understanding Chinese culture through its lexicon and popular songs.

 

 

AMLF_LLMFA