Dernières mises à jour en lien avec la COVID-19 disponibles ici.
Latest information about COVID-19 available here.

Mathematics and Statistics

Mathematics and Statistics

Location

Location

  • Department of Mathematics and Statistics
  • Burnside Hall, Room 1005
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3800
  • Fax: 514-398-3899
  • Email: grad.mathstat [at] mcgill.ca
  • Website: mcgill.ca/mathstat/

About Mathematics and Statistics

About Mathematics and Statistics

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs that can be focused on applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to master’s degrees (M.A. or M.Sc.), with program options in Bioinformatics. The research groups are:

  • Algebra;
  • Algebraic Geometry;
  • Analysis;
  • Applied Mathematics;
  • Differential Equations;
  • Differential Geometry;
  • Discrete Mathematics;
  • Geometric Group Theory;
  • Logic;
  • Mathematical Biology;
  • Mathematical Physics;
  • Number Theory;
  • Probability;
  • Statistics.

In the basic master’s programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option which requires a project. The Bioinformatics option requires a thesis. In addition to the Ph.D. program in Mathematics and Statistics, there is a Ph.D. option in Bioinformatics.

The Department's website provides extensive information on the Department and its facilities, including the research activities and research interests of individual faculty members. It also provides detailed supplementary information concerning our programs, admissions, funding of graduate students, thesis requirements, advice concerning the choice of courses, etc.

Students are urged to consult the Institut des Sciences Mathématiques (ISM) website, which coordinates intermediate and advanced-level graduate courses among Montreal and Quebec universities. A list of courses available under the ISM auspices can be obtained from the ISM website. The ISM also offers fellowships and promotes a variety of joint academic activities greatly enhancing the mathematical environment in Montreal and in the province of Quebec.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.A. programs are found in Arts > Graduate > Browse Academic Units & Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.A.). The thesis option requires a thesis and six approved courses.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.A.). The non-thesis option requires a project and eight approved courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.Sc. programs are found in Science > Graduate > Browse Academic Units & Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.). The thesis option requires a thesis and six approved courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis): Bioinformatics (48 credits)

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.).The non-thesis option requires a project and eight approved courses.

Ph.D. Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Mathematics and Statistics

The Department offers a course of studies leading to the Ph.D. degree. It differs substantially from the master’s programs in that the student must write a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge. The thesis topic is chosen by the student in consultation with the research supervisor. The thesis must be examined and approved by an internal examiner (normally the research supervisor), an external examiner, and the Oral Examination Committee. The student must present an oral defence of the thesis before that Committee. To submit a thesis for examination, the student must first pass comprehensive examinations.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Mathematics and Statistics: Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.

Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 9, 2021) (disclaimer)

Mathematics and Statistics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Mathematics and Statistics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements, the Department requirements are as follows:

Master's Degree

The normal entrance requirement for the master's programs is a Canadian honours degree or its equivalent, with high standing, in mathematics or a closely related discipline in the case of applicants intending to concentrate in statistics or applied mathematics.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in pure mathematics should have a strong background in linear algebra, abstract algebra, and real and complex analysis.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in statistics should have a strong background in linear algebra and basic real analysis. A calculus-based course in probability and one in statistics are required, as well as some knowledge of computer programming. Some knowledge of numerical analysis and optimization is desirable.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in applied mathematics should have a strong background in most of the areas of linear algebra, analysis, differential equations, discrete mathematics, and numerical analysis. Some knowledge of computer programming is also desirable.

Students whose preparation is insufficient for the program they wish to enter may, exceptionally, be admitted to a Qualifying year.

Ph.D. Degree

A master's degree with high standing is required, in addition to the requirements listed above for the master’s program. Students may transfer directly from the master’s program to the Ph.D. program under certain conditions. Students without a master's degree, but with exceptionally strong undergraduate training, may be admitted directly to Ph.D. 1.

Application Procedures

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See University Regulations & Resources > Graduate > Graduate Admissions and Application Procedures > Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Personal Statement – In the personal statement, the applicants should clearly explain their choice of preferred research group(s) and preferred area(s) of research, as well as providing relevant information that will not be reflected on their transcripts
  • Research Proposal (optional) – If applicants have a specific research problem of interest that they want to pursue, they may discuss the details in the research proposal
  • Applicants in pure and applied mathematics should provide a GRE score report, if available

For more details, please consult mcgill.ca/mathstat/postgraduate/prospective-students/admissions.

Application Dates and Deadlines

Application Dates and Deadlines

Application opening dates are set by Enrolment Services in consultation with Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (GPS), while application deadlines are set by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

  Application Opening Dates Application Deadlines
  All Applicants Non-Canadian citizens (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Canadian citizens/Perm. residents of Canada (incl. Special, Visiting & Exchange) Current McGill Students (any citizenship)
Fall Term: Sept. 15 Jan. 15 Jan. 15 Jan. 15
Winter Term: Feb. 15 Sept. 10 Sept. 15 Sept. 15
Summer Term: N/A N/A N/A N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 9, 2021) (disclaimer)

Mathematics and Statistics Faculty

Mathematics and Statistics Faculty

Chair
Jacques C. Hurtubise
Graduate Program Director
Rustum Choksi
Undergraduate Program Director
Johanna Neslehova
Emeritus Professors
William J. Anderson; B.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Michael Barr; A.B., Ph.D.(Penn.) (Peter Redpath Emeritus Professor of Pure Mathematics)
William G. Brown; B.A.(Tor.), M.A.(Col.), Ph.D.(Tor.)
Marta Bunge; M.A., Ph.D.(Penn.)
Ian Connell; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Manit.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Stephen Drury; Ph.D (Camb.)
Kohur N. GowriSankaran; B.A., M.A.(Madr.), Ph.D.(Bom.)
Paul Koosis; B.A., Ph.D.(Calif., Berk.)
Michael Makkai; M.A., Ph.D.(ELTE) (Peter Redpath Professor of Pure Mathematics)
Sherwin Maslowe; B.Sc.(Wayne), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Calif.)
Arak M. Mathai; M.Sc.(Kerala), M.A., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Karl Peter Russell; Vor.Dip.(Hamburg), Ph.D.(Calif.)
Georg Schmidt; B.Sc.(Natal), M.Sc.(S. Af.), Ph.D.(Stan.)
George P.H. Styan; M.A., Ph.D.(Col.)
Kwok Kuen Tam; M.A., Ph.D.(Tor.)
John C. Taylor; B.Sc.(Acad.), M.A.(Qu.), Ph.D.(McM.)
Jian-Jun Xu; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Beijing), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Rensselaer Poly.)
Sanjo Zlobec; M.Sc.(Zagreb), Ph.D.(N'western)
Professors
Masoud Asgharian; B.Sc.(SBU, Iran), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Peter Bartello; B.Sc.(Tor.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appt. with Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences)
Rustum Choksi; B.Sc.(Tor.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Brown)
Henri Darmon; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Harv.), F.R.S.C. (Distinguished James McGill Professor)
Christian Genest; B.Sp.Sc.(UQAC), M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Br. Col.) (Canada Research Chair)
Eyal Z. Goren; B.A., M.S., Ph.D.(Hebrew)
Pengfei Guan; B.Sc.(Zhejiang), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Princ.) (Distinguished James McGill Professor)
Jacques C. Hurtubise; B.Sc.(Montr.), D.Phil.(Oxf.) F.R.S.C.
Dmitry Jakobson; B.Sc.(MIT), Ph.D.(Princ.) (Peter Redpath Professor)
Vojkan Jaksic; B.S.(Belgrade), Ph.D.(Caltech.)
Niky Kamran; B.Sc., M.Sc.(ULB), Ph.D.(Wat.), F.R.S.C. (James McGill Professor)
Johanna Neslehova; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Hamburg), Ph.D.(Oldenburg)
Adam Oberman; B.S.(Tor.), M.S., Ph.D.(Chic.)
Charles Roth; M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Hebrew)
David A. Stephens; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Nott.)
Valentino Tosatti; M.A., Ph.D. (Harv.)
John A. Toth; B.Sc., M.Sc.(McM.), Ph.D.(MIT)
Adrian Vetta; B.Sc., M.Sc.(LSE), Ph.D.(MIT) (joint appt. with Computer Science)
Daniel T. Wise; B.A.(Yeshiva), Ph.D.(Princ.) (James McGill Professor)
David Wolfson; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Natal), Ph.D.(Purd.)
Associate Professors
Louigi Addario-Berry; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Antony R. Humphries; B.A., M.A.(Camb.), Ph.D.(Bath)
Abbas Khalili; B.S., M.S.(IUT, Iran), Ph.D.(Wat.)
Jean-Philippe Lessard; B.Sc.(Sher.), M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Georgia Tech.)
Jean-Christophe Nave; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Calif., Santa Barbara)
Sergey Norin; M.S.(SPbU), Ph.D.(Georgia Tech.)
Mikael Pichot; B.Sc.(Lyon), M.S., Ph.D.(ENS Lyon)
Piotr Przytycki; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Warsaw)
Marcin Sabok; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Warsaw)
Russell Steele; B.S., M.S.(Carn. Mell), Ph.D.(Wash.)
Gantumur Tsogtgerel; B.Sc.(NUM), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Utrecht)
Jérôme Vétois; Ph.D.(Cergy-Pontoise)
Assistant Professors
Patrick Allen; BMath (Wat.), MMath (Wat.), Ph.D.(Calif., Los Angeles)
Linan Chen; B.S.(Tsinghua), Ph.D.(MIT)
Sarah Harrison; B.Sc.(MIT), Ph.D.(Stan.) (joint appt. with Physics) (Canada Research Chair)
Tim Hoheisel; Dipl., Ph.D.(Wurzburg)
Jessica Lin; B.A.(NYU), Ph.D.(Chic.)(Canada Research Chair)
Michael Lipnowski; B.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(Stan.)
Courtney Paquette; Ph.D (Wash.)
Elliot Paquette; Ph.D (Wash.)
Brent Pym; B.Sc.E.(Qu.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Anush Tserunyan; B.S., M.S. (YSMU), Ph.D (Calif., Los Angeles)
Yi Yang; B.S.(Sichuan), M.S., Ph.D.(Minn.)
Associate Members
Xiao-Wen Chang (Computer Science)
Pierre R.L. Dutilleul (Plant Science)
Leon Glass (Physiology)
James A. Hanley (Epidemiology and Biostatistics)
Hamed Hatami (Computer Science)
Anmar Khadra (Physiology)
Xue Liu (Computer Science)
Michael Mackey (Physiology)
Erica E.M. Moodie (Epidemiology and Biostatistics)
Prakash Panangaden (Computer Science)
Robert W. Platt (Epidemiology and Biostatistics)
James O. Ramsay (Psychology)
Alexandra Schmidt (Epidemiology and Biostatistics)
Kaleem Siddiqi (Computer Science)
Christina Wolfson (Epidemiology and Biostatistics)
Adjunct Professors
Renato C. Calleja; B.S.(ITAM), Ph.D.(Texas-Austin)
Eliot Freid; B.S.(Cal Poly), M.S., Ph.D.(Calif. Tech.)
Andrew Granville; B.A., CASM(Camb.), Ph.D.(Qu.)
Adrian Iovita; B.S.(Bucharest), Ph.D.(Boston)
Dimitris Koukoulopoulos; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Ill.-Chic.)
Xin Yang Lu; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Pisa)
Etienne Marceau; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Laval); Ph.D.(Louvain)
Ming Mei; B.Sc., M.Sc.(JXNU), Ph.D.(Kanazawa)
M. Ram Murty; B.Sc.(Car.), Ph.D.(MIT), F.R.S.C.
Claude-Alain Pillet; M.Sc., Ph.D.(ETH Zurich)
Iosif Polterovich; M.Sc.(Moscow St.), Ph.D.(Weizmann Inst.)
Maksym Radziwill; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Stan.)
Robert A.G. Seely; B,Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Camb.)
F. Bruce Shepherd; B.Sc.(Vic., Tor.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Wat.)
Armen Shirikyan; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Moscow St.); Habilitation(Paris-Sud XI)
Pedro A. Valdes-Sosa; B.Sc.(Havana), Ph.D.(National Center for Scientific Research, Cuba)
Johannes Walcher; Dip., Ph.D.(ETH Zurich) (joint appt. with Physics)
Senior Faculty Lecturer
Axel Hundemer; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Munich)
Armel Djivede Kelome; M.Sc.(Benin), M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Georgia Tech.)
Faculty Lecturers
Rosalie Bélanger-Rioux; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(MIT)
José A. Correa; M.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(Car.)
Jérôme Fortier; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Laval), Ph.D.(UQAM)
Jeremy Macdonald; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Alta.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Sidney Trudeau; Ph.D.(McG.)
Alia Sajjad; Ph.D. (QAU)
Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 9, 2021) (disclaimer)

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Mathematics and Statistics

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Mathematics and Statistics: Bioinformatics

Thesis

A thesis for the doctoral degree must constitute original scholarship and must be a distinct contribution to knowledge. It must show familiarity with previous work in the field and must demonstrate ability to plan and carry out research, organize results, and defend the approach and conclusions in a scholarly manner. The research presented must meet current standards of the discipline; as well, the thesis must clearly demonstrate how the research advances knowledge in the field. Finally, the thesis must be written in compliance with norms for academic and scholarly expression and for publication in the public domain.

Required Courses (3 credits)

COMP 616D1 (1.5) Bioinformatics Seminar
COMP 616D2 (1.5) Bioinformatics Seminar
MATH 700 (0) Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination Part A
MATH 701 (0) Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination Part B

Complementary Courses (6 credits)

(3-6 credits)

The twelve one-semester complementary courses for the Ph.D. degree must include at least two from the list below, unless a student has completed the M.Sc.-level option in Bioinformatics, in which case only one course from the list below must be chosen:

BINF 621 (3) Bioinformatics: Molecular Biology
BMDE 652 (3) Bioinformatics: Proteomics
BTEC 555 (3) Structural Bioinformatics
COMP 618 (3) Bioinformatics: Functional Genomics
PHGY 603 (3) Systems Biology and Biophysics
Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2021-2022 (last updated Apr. 7, 2021) (disclaimer)
Faculty of Science—2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 9, 2021) (disclaimer)
Back to top