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Undergraduate Handbook

The Faculty of Science's Undergraduate Handbook is your guide to obtaining a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts & Science degree at McGill University. Read the Handbook in conjunction with the eCalendar, which is the definitive authority on all courses and programs at McGill.

Don't hesitate to ask for advice!

Neither the Handbook nor the eCalendar is a substitute for speaking with an academic adviser. See your SOUSA advisor's Same-Day advising schedule and come in for a visit.


Table of contents

1. Applying

› 1.1 Applying to the Bachelor of Science degree

› 1.2 Applying to the Bachelor of Arts & Science degree

› 1.3 Applying to the Bachelor of Arts degree

› 1.4 Second Bachelor degree

2. New Students

› 2.1 Welcome to the Faculty (Link to New Student website)

3. Later years

› 3.1 Finishing your first year

› 3.2 Bachelor of Science students

> 3.2.1 Restrictions on courses outside the Faculty of Science

› 3.3 Bachelor of Arts & Science students

4. Study Abroad Options

› 4.1 McGill Student Exchange Programs

› 4.2 Study at a Quebec university (IUT)

› 4.3 Independent study away

› 4.4 Summer studies at a university outside Quebec

› 4.5 Transfer credits

5. Degree transfers

› 5.1 Limits on eligibility to apply for a degree transfer

› 5.2 Transfer requirements and instructions

› 5.3 Appeals

› 5.4 Next steps

› 5.5 Advice

6. Readmission

7. Special, visiting and incoming exchange students

› 7.1 Getting started at McGill

› 7.2 Advising appointments

› 7.3 Selecting courses as a special, visiting or exchange student

› 7.4 What to do if you experience difficulties

› 7.5 Extending your time at McGill

8. Academic advice

› 8.1 Making academic decisions

› 8.2 Self-assessment

› 8.3 Study skills

› 8.4 Failing a course

9. Choosing courses

› 9.1 Credit load

› 9.2 English and French second language courses

› 9.3 Language courses

› 9.4 600-level courses

10. Course and program registration

› 10.1 Online registration system

› 10.2 Registering for programs

› 10.3 Registering for courses

› 10.4 Registering for Freshman courses

› 10.5 Courses offered by faculties other than Arts and Science

› 10.6 Tips on handling registration problems

› 10.7 Add/Drop period

› 10.8 Verifying your student record

› 10.9 Registration errors

› 10.10 Cancelling your registration

› 10.11 Proof of enrolment

11. Exams and assessment

› 11.1 Academic integrity

› 11.2 Course evaluation and grading procedures

› 11.3 Final examinations

› 11.4 University examination regulations

› 11.5 Reassessment and rereads

› 11.6 Deferred examinations

› 11.7 Supplemental examinations

› 11.8 Illness

12. Internships and field studies

› 12.1 Credit for internship courses for B.A. & Sc. students

13. Withdrawals

› 13.1 Course withdrawals

› 13.2 University withdrawals

14. Graduating

› 14.1 Graduation checklists

› 14.2 Frequently asked questions about graduation


1. Applying

If you are interested in pursuing undergraduate science studies at McGill, you should consider applying to any one of the following degrees:

› Bachelor of Science
› Bachelor of Arts & Science
› Bachelor of Arts

Admission to these programs is handled by the Admissions Office in Enrolment Services. The Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) cannot answer questions related to admissions.  Visit mcgill.ca/applying to find out more about the application process, including application deadlines, admissions criteria, special requirements for specific programs, language proficiency requirements, visa requirements, transcript requirements, and more.

If you are already a McGill undergraduate student and wish to return to your studies after an absence of part of an academic year or longer, or you wish to transfer to the Faculty of Science from another McGill faculty, you will need to apply through the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA), not Enrolment Services. For more information, please see:

› Readmission
› Inter-faculty transfers

1.1 Applying to the Bachelor of Science degree

When you apply for admission to the Bachelor of Science degree, you will be asked to nominate one of the following program groups and a major/subject within that group:

  • Biological, Biomedical and Life Sciences Group
  • Bio-Physical-Computational Sciences Group
  • Neuroscience Group
  • Physical, Earth, Math and Computer Science Group

It is important to apply for the group that interests you most because, if you are admitted, your choice of a major or honours program will be limited to the options available in that group.

If you later decide you wish to pursue a program in a different program group, you will need to apply for an intra-faculty transfer, subject to academic performance, availability and other conditions.

1.1.2 Bachelor of Science program groups

The options available within each program group are as follows:

Biological, Biomedical and Life Sciences Group

Biological, Biomedical & Life Sciences Group

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Bio-Physical-Computational Sciences Group

Neuroscience Group

Neuroscience Group

Major Program

Honours Program

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Physical, Earth, Math and Computer Science Group

Physical, Earth, Math & Computer Science Group

Major Programs

Honours Programs

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Only applicants with a Quebec CEGEP diploma may select the Neuroscience group. All other applicants may seek entry to the neuroscience program once they have completed a year at McGill and have satisfied the transfer requirements for Neuroscience. Note that admission to Neuroscience is competetive and meeting the minimum entrance/transfer requirements does not guarantee admission.

If you are likely to be granted exemptions from some or all of the freshman science requirements based on advanced standing or transfer credits, you can select a major/subject from your chosen group at the time of your application. Alternatively, you can select the option ‘Undeclared’ if you wish to make this decision at a later time.

If you are not likely to be granted exemptions from any of the freshman science requirements, select ‘Freshman Science’ as your major/subject.

The online application form allows you to make two program choices for a single application fee. You may choose two different Science program groups, or choose one Science group and a program from another faculty. Applicants are encouraged to use both choices, putting their preferred choice first. Both choices will be considered and you will receive an admission decision on both. If you wish to apply for more than two programs, you will need to submit another application and pay an additional application fee.

1.2 Applying to the Bachelor of Arts & Science degree

The B.A. & Sc. degree, jointly offered through the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science, is designed for students who have clearly-defined interests in both Arts and Science. While the degree provides a broad education that includes in-depth study of disciplines in both Faculties, the number of elective courses a student can take is limited. Students entering the B.A. & Sc. program therefore must know in precisely which disciplines they wish to focus. Note that students who intend to pursue graduate studies in science or to attend medical school may have to complete additional courses as electives or beyond the basic degree requirements.

1.3 Applying to the Bachelor of Arts degree

There are four units within the Faculty of Science that offer B.A. degrees through the Faculty of Arts as well as B.Sc. degrees through the Faculty of Science. They are the School of Computer Science, the Department of Geography, the Department of Mathematics & Statistics, and the Department of Psychology.

One reason to consider a B.A. over a B.Sc. is if you have the prerequisites for computer science, geography, mathematics and statistics, or psychology, but do not have all the basic science prerequisites needed for admission to a B.Sc. In the case of computer science, bear in mind that computer science programs have a strong mathematics component regardless of whether you choose the B.A. or B.Sc. stream.

You might also choose to apply for admission to a Bachelor of Arts because you wish to pursue a particular program combination only available in a B.A. – e.g. Joint Honours in English and Mathematics.

1.4 Second Bachelor degree

Information on how to apply to either the B.Sc. or the B.A. & Sc. as a second bachelor degree after the completion of a first bachelor degree can be found on the Admissions website.

For information on taking a B.Sc. or B.A. & Sc. as a second degree concurrently with a first degree, please contact pete.barry [at] mcgill.ca (Pete Barry), Chief Academic Adviser in Science.


2. New Students

2.1 Welcome to the Faculty of Science

The Faculty of Science's New Students Website is a must-read for all new Science and Arts & Science students.

The Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) team would like to help you begin your McGill career successfully. We have prepared the New Student Website to help you organize your priorities as you begin your university studies.  On the site, you will find informaiton on the following topics:

  • Checklist to help you organize your academic priorities
  • Orientation information
  • Preparing for registration by planning your first year course selection (includes information on transfer credits and exemptions, Freshaman (U0) requirements and degree requirements)
  • Important registration information and tips
  • Academic advising for new students

For information on other aspects of your first year university experience (finances, housing, legal documents and more), please consult Enrolment Services' “Next Steps” website.

 


3. Later years

3.1 Finishing your first year

As you approach the end of your first year as a Science or Arts & Science student, it's time to start thinking about the next stage of your degree. Here are a couple of things you need to do to make sure the transition is a smooth one:

1. Get advice

All currently registered students who expect to return to McGill are strongly encouraged to see their adviser(s) and to register for courses before leaving for the summer. As all courses are limited by enrolment, you may not be able to register for the courses of your choice if you postpone registration until August. Make sure you register in at least one course prior to the date when late registration fees are charged.

Freshman advising appointments
If at the end of the current term you will have 97 or more credits left to complete your degree requirements, you will be continuing in the freshman program. You should arrange for an advising appointment with a Faculty adviser by contacting SOUSA or by coming to the information counter in Dawson Hall.

Departmental appointments
If at the end of the current term you will have 96 or fewer credits left to complete your degree requirements, you should be registered in a departmental program or preparing to choose one for the upcoming year. Please contact the department(s) for information about your program requirements.

For freshman students who are not certain of which program(s) they wish to select, you may contact your Faculty advisor.

Science departmental office hours, locations, and phone numbers should be available on their websites, and also in the Arts and Science sections of the eCalendar.

2. Register for the next term

For more information on what to do next, refer to the sections in this handbook on Choosing courses and Registration.

3.2 Bachelor of Science students

The eCalendar is the definitive authority on the course and program requirements you need to meet in order to obtain a Bachelor of Science degree at McGill. Here are a few sections from the eCalendar frequently sought by B.Sc. students.

Advanced standing

Advanced Standing

Advanced Standing of up to 30 credits may be granted to students who obtain satisfactory results in International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, Advanced Placement tests, or the Diploma of Collegial Studies (DCS). Quebec students with a DCS in Science are granted 30 credits Advanced Standing and will have normally completed the equivalent of, and are therefore exempt from, the basic science courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Students with satisfactory results in International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, and Advanced Placement tests may be exempt from some or all of the basic science courses. You will not be given additional credit toward your degree for any McGill course where the content overlaps substantially with any other course for which you have already received credit, such as for Advanced Standing results.

AP Examination results with a score of 4 or 5 must be declared by you at the time of initial registration at the University.

For more information about Advanced Standing, consult: mcgill.ca/students/transfercredit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Course requirements

Course Requirements for Bachelor of Science

All required and complementary courses used to fulfil program requirements, including the basic Science requirements, must be completed with a grade of C or better. If you fail to obtain a Satisfactory grade in a required course, you must either pass the supplemental examination in the course or do additional work for a supplemental grade, if these options are available, or repeat the course. Course substitution will be allowed only in special cases; you should consult your academic adviser.

Normally, you are permitted to repeat a failed course only once. (Failure is considered to be a grade of less than C or the administrative failures of J and KF.) If a required course is failed a second time, you must appeal to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, Faculty of Science for permission to take the course a third time. If permission is denied by the Associate Dean and/or by the Committee on Student Standing on appeal, you must withdraw from the program. If the failed course is a complementary course required by the program, you may choose to replace it with another appropriate complementary course. If you choose to substitute another complementary course for a complementary course in which a D was received, credit for the first course will still be given, but as an elective. If you repeat a required course in which a D was received, credit will be given only once.

Full details of the course requirements for all programs offered are given in each unit’s section together with the locations of departmental advisory offices, program directors, and telephone numbers should further information be required.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Course Overlap Policy

You will not receive additional credit towards your degree for any course that overlaps in content with a course for which you have already received credit at McGill, CEGEP, at another university, or Advanced Placement exams, Advanced Level results, International Baccalaureate Diploma, or French Baccalaureate. It is your responsibility to consult with a Faculty Adviser in Arts OASIS, the Science Office for Undergraduate Advising (SOUSA), or the department offering the course as to whether or not credit can be obtained and to be aware of exclusion clauses specified in the course description in this publication. Please refer to the following website for specific information about Advanced Standing credits and McGill course exemptions: mcgill.ca/transfercredit.

Sometimes the same course is offered by two different departments. Such courses are called "double-prefix" courses. When such courses are offered simultaneously, you should take the course offered by the department in which you are obtaining your degree. For example, in the case of double-prefix courses CHEM XYZ and PHYS XYZ, Chemistry students take CHEM XYZ and the Physics students take PHYS XYZ. If a double-prefix course is offered by different departments in alternate years, you may take whichever course best fits your schedule.

Note for Arts Students: Credit for computer courses offered by the School of Computer Science is governed by rules specified in each individual course description.
Note for Science and Bachelor of Arts and Science students:

Credit for statistics courses offered by faculties other than Arts and Science requires the permission of the Associate Dean (Student Affairs), Science, except for students in the B.Sc. Major in Environment, who may take required statistics courses in the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences necessary to satisfy their program requirements.

Credit for computer courses offered by faculties other than Science requires the permission of the Director of Advising Services and will be granted only under exceptional circumstances.

For Arts, Science, and Bachelor of Arts and Science students

Credit for statistics courses will be given with the following stipulations:

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Courses Outside the Faculties of Arts and Science

As a student in the Faculty of Science, you should consult the statement of regulations for taking courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science (see below). A list of approved/not-approved courses in other faculties is posted on the SOUSA website (mcgill.ca/science/undergraduate/handbook). You may take courses on the approved list and may not, under any circumstances, take courses on the not-approved list for credit. Requests for permission to take courses that are not on either list should be addressed to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs for Science.

The regulations are as follows:

  • You may take only 6 credits per year, up to 18 credits in all, of courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science.
  • Courses offered “in the Faculty of Science” or “in the Faculty of Arts” are found in the eCalendar All Courses search, when filtered by “Faculty of Science” or by “Faculty of Arts.”
  • Courses in other faculties that are considered as taught by Science (e.g., BIOT, EXMD, and PHAR) are so designated as offered by the “Faculty of Science” in the eCalendar All Courses search.
  • Courses in Music are considered as outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science, except MUAR courses, which are considered Arts courses.
  • All courses listed in the Religious Studies (RELG) section are considered courses in Arts and Science except for courses restricted to B.Th. or S.T.M. students and courses that require permission from the Chair of the B.Th. Committee.
  • Students should consult the list of restricted courses outside of the Faculties of Arts and of Science on the SOUSA website (mcgill.ca/science/undergraduate/handbook).
  • You must have the necessary prerequisites and permission of the instructor for such courses.
  • Credit for computer and statistics courses offered by faculties other than Arts and Science require the permission of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs for Science and will be granted only under exceptional circumstances.
  • If you use Minerva to register for a course, and it exceeds the specified limitations or it is not approved, the course will be flagged for no credit after the course change period.
  • Credit will not be given for any “how to” courses offered by other faculties that are intended to provide you with only practical or professional training in specific applied areas. Examples include courses that teach the use of certain computer packages (databases, spreadsheets, etc.) or computer languages (SQL, COBOL, FORTRAN, etc.); machine shop or electronic shop courses; technical drawing courses; and professional practice courses.
  • As a student in the Bieler School of Environment, you may exceed the 18-credit limit for courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science, provided that all such courses are necessary to complete your program of study.
  • As a student in the Major in Software Engineering, you may exceed the 18-credit limit for courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science, provided that all such courses are necessary to complete your program of study.
  • As a student in the B.Sc. Liberal Program taking a Major Concentration in Music, you may exceed the 18-credit limit for courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science, provided that all such courses are necessary to complete your program of study, up to a maximum of 36 Music credits.
  • The 18-credit limit applies to students taking the Minor in Nutrition; equivalent courses in Science should be taken instead of courses in the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 1, 2021).

Correspondence, Distance Education, or Web-based Courses

As a Science student, you may obtain transfer credit for correspondence, distance education, or web-based courses if you receive prior approval from the appropriate McGill department for the course content and prior approval from the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, Science, for the method of delivery and evaluation. Courses taught through distance education from institutions other than McGill will only be considered for transfer credits under the following conditions:

  • The course is given by a government-accredited, degree-granting institution acceptable to McGill.
  • The course counts for credit toward degrees granted at the institution giving the course.
  • The combined total of regular course credits and distance education course credits do not exceed the permitted maximum number of credits per term according to Faculty regulations.
  • Courses taught through distance education may not be used to complete program requirements, except on an individual basis when serious, documented circumstances warrant it.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Courses in English as a Second Language (ESL)

ESL courses are only open to students whose primary language is not English and who have studied for fewer than five years in English-language secondary institutions. As a student in the B.Sc., you may take a maximum of 12 credits, including academic writing courses for non-anglophones, from the list of ESL courses published in the Handbook under Course Restrictions mcgill.ca/science/undergraduate/handbook/.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Apr. 1, 2021).

Registration for First-Year Seminars in the Faculty of Science

Registration for First-Year Seminars is limited to students in their first year of study at McGill, i.e., newly admitted students in U0 or U1. These courses are designed to provide a closer interaction with professors and better working relations with peers than is available in large introductory courses. These seminars endeavour to teach the latest scholarly developments and expose participants to advanced research methods. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum number of students in any seminar is 25, although some are limited to fewer than that.

You may take only one First-Year Seminar. If you register for more than one, you will be obliged to withdraw from all but one of them. Please consult the departmental listings for course descriptions and availability.

First-Year Seminars
CHEM 199 FYS: Why Chemistry?
EPSC 199 FYS: Earth & Planetary Exploration
PSYC 199 FYS: Mind-Body Medicine
PSYT 199 FYS: Mental Illness and the Brain

The First-Year Seminars offered by the Faculty of Arts are also open to Science students. For a complete listing, please consult Faculty of Arts > Undergraduate > Browse Academic Units & Programs > First-Year Seminars.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Course Credit Weight

The credit assigned to a particular course should reflect the amount of effort it demands of you. Normally, one credit will represent three hours total work per week for one term—including a combination of lecture hours, other contact hours, such as laboratory periods, tutorials, and problem periods, as well as personal study time.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 1, 2021).

Grading and grade point averages (GPA)

Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA)

Note for Physical and Occupational Therapy: A grade of C+ is a minimum required passing grade for courses with the subject codes of OCC1, PHTH, and POTH. A grade of C is a minimum required passing grade for all other courses. For complete details, refer to the Rules and Regulations, available at mcgill.ca/spot/programs.

Instructors may submit final grades as either letter grades or in percentages, but the official grade in each course, which displays on the transcript is the letter grade. Where appropriate, a class average appears on transcripts expressed as the letter grade most representative of the class performance. In such cases, the class average is calculated for courses, where the total number of grades in all of its course sections is 25 or more, and the grades have a grade point (e.g. grades of S, U or P don’t have grade points).

Since Fall 2002, the University has only used letter grades on transcripts and verification forms.

Grades A through C represent satisfactory passes, D a conditional (non-continuation) pass, and F a failure. Certain courses have been approved for Pass/Fail (P/F) grading. Students may also designate elective courses to be graded under the S/U option. See Courses Taken under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option.

You must obtain a grade of C or better in courses that you take to fulfil program requirements. You may not register in a course unless you have passed all the prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better, except by written permission of the appropriate department chair.

Grades Grade Points Numerical Scale of Grades
A 4.0 85 – 100%
A- 3.7 80 – 84%
B+ 3.3 75 – 79%
B 3.0 70 – 74%
B- 2.7 65 – 69%
C+ 2.3 60 – 64%
C 2.0 55 – 59%
D 1.0 50 – 54%
F (Fail) 0 0 – 49%
Note for Engineering: The Faculty of Engineering does not use this numeric scale. See Note for Engineering below.
Note for Law: Faculty of Law does not use this numeric scale.

The University assigns grade points to letter grades according to the table above. Your Academic Standing (e.g. satisfactory, probationary), which is your academic status at the end of each term, is determined by a grade point average (GPA), which is calculated by multiplying the course credit by the grade points, and dividing the sum by the total course GPA credits. The GPA result is truncated by two decimal points and not rounded up to the nearest decimal point. For example, a GPA of 3.596 will display on the transcript as 3.59 and is NOT rounded up to 3.60.

GPA credits are the credits of courses with grades that are assigned grade points.

The term grade point average (TGPA) is the GPA for a given term calculated using all the applicable courses at the same level in that term. The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is the GPA calculated using your entire record of applicable courses at McGill at the same level; if you change levels, e.g., from undergraduate to graduate, the CGPA starts again.

This policy took effect in January 2003. Prior to January 2003, if your degree program had changed, e.g., from B.Sc. to B.A., the CGPA calculation restarted again. For students with academic information prior to Fall 2002, who are registered in a different program or in a different level post-Fall 2002, the transcript displays a special message regarding the CGPA restarting.

If you repeat courses, all final grades are included in the GPA calculation. Therefore, grades of D or F continue to be used in the CGPA calculation even after you repeat the course or if you take a supplemental examination. Note that credits are only granted once for a repeated course regardless of the passing grade.

You must obtain a minimum CGPA of 2.00 to be considered for graduation with a McGill degree.

Note: During the first week of lectures, each instructor will provide you with a written course outline. This information should include, where appropriate:
  • whether there will be a final examination in the course;
  • how term work will affect the final grade in the course;
  • how term work will be distributed through the term;
  • whether there will be a supplemental examination in the course, and if so, whether the supplemental exam will be worth 100% of the supplemental grade, or whether term work will be included in the supplemental grade (courses with formal final examinations must have supplementals);
  • whether students with grades of D, F, J, or U will have the option of submitting additional work, and, if so, how the supplemental grade will be calculated with the extra work (applicable only to students in Science and B.A. & Sc.).
Note for Engineering: In the Faculty of Engineering, letter grades are assigned according to the grading scheme adopted by the professor in charge of a particular course. This may not correspond to grades indicated in the “Numerical Scale of Grades” column in Grading and Grade Point Averages. A grade of D indicates marginal performance which is acceptable only for Complementary Studies courses (i.e., Group A Impact of Technology on Society and Group B Humanities and Social Sciences, Management Studies and Law), Natural Science Complementary Courses (for Computer Engineering and Software Engineering students from CEGEP), and Elective Courses (for Mechanical Engineering students from CEGEP and for Architecture students). A grade of D is not acceptable for required (core) courses (including Year 0 (Freshman) math and science courses), technical complementary courses, laboratory complementary courses, or courses in any other category of the Engineering programs. Individual departments/schools will decide if a student with a D in a prerequisite course(s) may take the subsequent course.
Grades have the following designations:
A, A- Very Good
B+, B, B- Good
C+, C Satisfactory
D Conditional Pass
F Fail
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 16, 2021).

Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA): Other Grades

Note: Not all grades listed below apply to every faculty, school or level. Faculty policy prevails when determining if a student may be eligible to receive one of these grades.
Other Grades

J

unexcused absence (failed); the student is registered for a course but does not write the final examination or do other required work; calculated as a failure in the TGPA and CGPA

K

incomplete; instructor has extended the deadline for submission of work in a course

KE or K*

further extension granted for submission of work in a course, approval from the Faculty SAO may be required

KF

failed to meet the extended deadline for submission of work in a course; calculated as a failure in TGPA and CGPA

KK

completion requirement waived; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA; Associate Dean approval is required.

L

approved to write a deferred examination in a course

LE or L*

permitted to defer examination for more than the normal period

NR

no grade reported by the instructor (recorded by the Registrar)

P

pass; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA

Q

course continued in next term (applicable only to courses taken pre-Fall 2002)

S

satisfactory; equivalent to C or better in an elective course; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA (See Courses Taken under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option)

U

unsatisfactory; equivalent to D or F in an elective course; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA (See Courses Taken under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option)

W

withdrew; a course dropped, with permission, after the Course Change deadline; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA

WF

withdrew failing; a course dropped, with special permission in an exceptional case, after faculty deadline for withdrawal from course, the student's performance in the course at that stage being on the level of an F; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA (Not used by Music.)

WL

faculty permission to withdraw from a deferred examination; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA

NA or &&

grade not yet available

W- - or - -

no grade; student withdrew from the University, not calculated in TGPA or CGPA (applicable only to courses taken pre-Fall 2002)

Note for Physical and Occupational Therapy: Grades of S/U are not applicable.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 16, 2021).

Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA): Unexcused Absences

All students who miss a final exam or do not complete other final work in a course are given a J grade. You then have the following options:

  1. Ask to be assigned a grade based only on the grades earned for your work submitted up to, but not including, the final exam or final course work.

    The grade earned is calculated by adding the grades obtained on the individual pieces of work and a grade of 0 for the portion of the final grade allocated to the final exam or final course work. This option is not available if the professor stipulated in the course outline that the final exam is a required part of the evaluation.

  2. Request a deferred exam, if you have the appropriate reasons and documentation.
  3. Apply for a supplemental exam if permitted by your faculty.
Note for Engineering: Option 1 is not available to students in the Faculty of Engineering.
Note for Law: Option 1 is not available to students in the Faculty of Law. Option 3 is by approval of the Associate Dean (Academic) or the Director (Student Life & Learning) only.
Note for Music: Option 1 is not available to students in the Schulich School of Music.

You must request option 1 no later than four months after the end of the examination period of the original course.

You must request option 2 by the faculty deadlines as indicated in University Regulations & Resources > Undergraduate > Examinations: General Information > Final Examinations > Final Examinations: Deferred Examinations.

You must request option 3 by the faculty deadlines as indicated at mcgill.ca/exams.

If you wish to appeal a J grade, you should write to your Associate Dean or Director.

Note for the Faculties of Arts and Science (including B.A. & Sc.): Requests are made at Service Point (3415 McTavish Street). However, it is important that you also see a Faculty adviser in Arts OASIS or SOUSA to talk about your options and the effects that your request may have on your studies. For more information, see mcgill.ca/students/advising.
Note for Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies: Only options 2 and 3 above are applicable to graduate students. Students wishing to appeal a J grade should write to the Associate Registrar, Management of Academic Records.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 16, 2021).

Equivalencies for non-basic Science courses

Equivalencies for Non-Basic Science Courses

Note that equivalencies for some non-basic science courses, such as CHEM 212 and CHEM 222 and PSYC 204, are granted on a per-CEGEP basis. In some cases, a grade greater than the minimum passing grade may be required. For more information about equivalences for non-basic Science courses, please consult: mcgill.ca/students/transfercredit/prospective/cegep.

If the CEGEP and/or course is not listed on this website, you should refer to your SOUSA adviser at mcgill.ca/science/undergraduate/advice/sousa.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Minimum credit requirement for the Bachelor of Science degree

Minimum Credit Requirement for Bachelor of Science Degree

The minimum credit requirement for your degree is determined at the time of acceptance and is specified in your letter of admission.

Students are normally admitted to a four-year degree requiring the completion of 120 credits.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Program requirements

Program Requirements for the Faculty of Science

The Faculty of Science offers a vast array of study and research opportunities at the undergraduate level, and it is very important that you familiarize yourself with all the alternatives open to you before deciding on a program of study. For an overview of programs offered in the B.Sc., see the Faculty of Science Programs of Study at mcgill.ca/science/programs.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 1, 2021).

Liberal, Major, and Honours Programs

As a Science student, if you need 96 or fewer credits to complete your degree requirements, you are required to select your courses in each term with a view to timely completion of your degree and program requirements. You must register in one of the following types of departmental programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science:

Liberal Programs

Liberal programs provide students with the opportunity to study the core of one science discipline along with a breadth component from another area of science or from many other disciplines. In a liberal program, you must complete a Core Science Component (CSC) (45–50 credits), plus a Breadth Component (at least 18 credits). The requirements for the Core Science Components are given under departmental sections of this publication whenever applicable.

For the Breadth Component, you must complete one of the following:

  • Minor Program (18–24 credits) – one of the programs listed in Minor Programs.
  • Arts Minor or Major Concentration (18 or 36 credits) – one of the programs listed in Arts Major and Minor Concentrations Open to Science Students.
  • A Core Science Component in a second area (45–50 credits) – at least 24 credits must be distinct from the courses used to satisfy the primary Core Science Component. Note that a second Core Science Component can be selected from any of the Science groups.

Major Programs

Major programs are more specialized than liberal programs and are usually centred on a specific discipline or department.

Honours Programs

Honours programs typically involve an even higher degree of specialization, often include supervised research, and require students to maintain a high academic standard. Although honours programs are specially designed to prepare you for graduate studies, graduates of the other degree programs may also be admissible to many graduate schools. If you intend to pursue graduate studies in your discipline, you should consult a departmental adviser regarding the appropriate selection of courses in your field.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Minor and Minor Concentration Programs for the Faculty of Science

In addition to the liberal, major, and honours degree programs, as a student in the Faculty of Science, you may select a minor or approved minor concentration program. These are coherent sequences of courses in a given discipline or interdisciplinary area that may be taken in addition to the courses required for the degree program.

Science minors consist of up to 24 credits.

Arts minor concentrations consist of 18 credits.

A minimum of 18 new credits must be completed in the Minor or Minor concentration.

For a list of "Minor Programs," see Minor Programs; for minor concentrations that are approved for Science students, see Arts Major and Minor Concentrations Open to Science Students.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Other Second Programs

In addition to a major or honours program, you may pursue a second major or honours program, or an Arts major concentration program. Each major or honours program must contain a minimum of 36 credits that are distinct from the courses used to satisfy the other program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Special Designations for Bachelor of Science Students

The Faculty of Science recognizes Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) students who have gone beyond a typical B.Sc. experience by awarding certain special designations to their student record and degree at graduation.

B.Sc. Global Designation

For details on the B.Sc. Global Designation, students should refer to mcgill.ca/science/undergraduate/programs/bsc-global.

Internship Program Designation

All B.Sc. programs can include an internship component. For more details, students should refer to Science Internships and Field Studies and mcgill.ca/science/undergraduate/internships-field/internships.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Bieler School of Environment

The Faculty of Science is one of the four faculties in partnership with the Bieler School of Environment. For more information, see Bieler School of Environment.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 1, 2021).

Readmission after interruption of studies for a period of five consecutive years or more

Readmission after Interruption of Studies for a Period of Five Consecutive Years or More

If you are readmitted after interrupting your studies for a period of five consecutive years or more, you may be required to complete a minimum of 60 credits and satisfy the requirements of a program. In this case, a new CGPA will be calculated. The Associate Dean, Student Affairs for Science, in consultation with the appropriate department, may approve a lower minimum for students who had completed 60 credits or more before interrupting their studies.

If you are readmitted after a period of absence, you are subject to the program and degree requirements in effect at the time of readmission. The Associate Dean, Student Affairs for Science, in consultation with the department, may approve exemption from any new requirements.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Residency requirement

Residency Requirements for Faculty of Science Degrees

To obtain a B.Sc. degree, you must satisfy the following residency requirements: a minimum of 60 credits of courses used to satisfy the B.Sc. degree requirements must be taken and passed at McGill, exclusive of any courses completed as part of the Science Freshman program; see B.Sc. Freshman Program. At least two-thirds of all departmental program requirements (Honours, Major, Core Science Components, or Minor) must normally be completed at McGill not including courses completed in a prior McGill degree. Exceptionally, students in major concentrations or interfaculty or honours programs who pursue an approved Study Away or Exchange program may, with prior approval from both their department and the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, Faculty of Science, be exempted from the two-thirds rule. In addition, some departments may require that their students complete specific components of their program at McGill.

The residency requirement for diploma programs is 30 credits completed at McGill.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Time and credit limit for the completion of the Bachelor of Science degree

Time and Credit Limit for the Completion of the Degree for the Faculty of Science

If you need 96 or fewer credits to complete your degree requirements, you are expected to complete your degree in no more than eight terms after your initial registration for the degree.

If you are a student in the Freshman Program, you become subject to these regulations one year after your initial registration. If you want to exceed this time limit, you must seek permission of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, of the Faculty of Science.

If you are registered in the B.Sc., you are expected to complete the requirements of your program and your degree within 120 credits. You will receive credit for all courses (subject to degree regulations) taken up to and including the semester in which you obtain 120 credits. If you want to remain at McGill beyond that semester, you must also seek permission of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, Faculty of Science. Permission for exceeding the time and/or credit limits will normally be granted only for valid academic reasons, such as a change of program (subject to departmental approval) and part-time status. If permission is granted, you will receive credit only for required and complementary courses necessary to complete your program requirements.

Students who have been granted Advanced Standing for the International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement examinations, GCE A-Levels, French Baccalaureate, and other qualifications may complete 120 credits following admission, as per the university regulations described in University Regulations and Resources > Student Records > Advanced Standing Transfer Credits.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

3.2.1 Restrictions on courses outside the Faculty of Science

While all courses offered at McGill have academic merit, not all are appropriate for credit towards the B.Sc. degree.

Students in the Faculty of Science should consult the eCalendar regulations on taking courses outside the faculties of Arts and Science. These regulations may change from year to year. Any approval or disapproval of a course for credit towards the B.Sc. is valid for the current academic year only. No assumption should be made as to the past or future effect of a course's approval or disapproval for credit.

Click to see the eCalendar regulations on courses taken outside the Faculties of Arts and Science

As a student in the Faculty of Science, you should consult the statement of regulations for taking courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science (see below). A list of approved/not-approved courses in other faculties is posted on the SOUSA website (mcgill.ca/science/undergraduate/handbook). You may take courses on the approved list and may not, under any circumstances, take courses on the not-approved list for credit. Requests for permission to take courses that are not on either list should be addressed to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs for Science.

The regulations are as follows:

 
  • You may take only 6 credits per year, up to 18 credits in all, of courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science.
  • Courses offered “in the Faculty of Science” or “in the Faculty of Arts” are found in the eCalendar All Courses search, when filtered by “Faculty of Science” or by “Faculty of Arts.”
  • Courses in other faculties that are considered as taught by Science (e.g., BIOT, EXMD, and PHAR) are so designated as offered by the “Faculty of Science” in the eCalendar All Courses search.
  • Courses in Music are considered as outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science, except MUAR courses, which are considered Arts courses.
  • All courses listed in the Religious Studies (RELG) section are considered courses in Arts and Science except for courses restricted to B.Th. or S.T.M. students and courses that require permission from the Chair of the B.Th. Committee.
  •  Students should consult the list of restricted courses outside of the Faculties of Arts and of Science on the SOUSA website (see below - 3.2.2)
  • You must have the necessary prerequisites and permission of the instructor for such courses.
  • Credit for computer and statistics courses offered by faculties other than Arts and Science require the permission of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs for Science and will be granted only under exceptional circumstances.
  • If you use Minerva to register for a course, and it exceeds the specified limitations or it is not approved, the course will be flagged for no credit after the course change period.
  • Credit will not be given for any “how to” courses offered by other faculties that are intended to provide you with only practical or professional training in specific applied areas. Examples include courses that teach the use of certain computer packages (databases, spreadsheets, etc.) or computer languages (SQL, COBOL, FORTRAN, etc.); machine shop or electronic shop courses; technical drawing courses; and professional practice courses.
  • As a student in the Bieler School of Environment, you may exceed the 18-credit limit for courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science, provided that all such courses are necessary to complete your program of study.
  • As a student in the Major in Software Engineering, you may exceed the 18-credit limit for courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science, provided that all such courses are necessary to complete your program of study.
  • As a student in the B.Sc. Liberal Program taking a Major Concentration in Music, you may exceed the 18-credit limit for courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science, provided that all such courses are necessary to complete your program of study, up to a maximum of 36 Music credits.
  • The 18-credit limit applies to students taking the Minor in Nutrition; equivalent courses in Science should be taken instead of courses in the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
 

 

 

Unfortuntely, Minerva does not know about all the rules, so it is mechanically possible for a student to register for any number of courses that are not open to them. Eventually, these courses will be identified on students' records and flagged for no credit. In some cases, this may happen when records are verified just before graduation, which could delay graduation until appropriate courses are taken.

How can you tell which Faculty offers a course?

Copy the course number (or just the subject code) into the search window in the eCalendar. Make sure to select "Entire site" beside the search window, then hit Search. When the results come up, select the "Courses" tab and look for your course. Select it and look near the top of the page, just below the course title. There will be a line indicating who offers the course.

For example:

LSCI 211 Biochemistry 1 (3 credits)
Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

This course is offered by the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and is listed below on the Not Approved list.

3.2.2 List of approved and restricted courses outside the Faculty of Science

Students may take courses on the approved list below and may not, under any circumstances, take courses on the not-approved list for credit toward their BSc. Requests for permission to take courses that are not on either list should be addressed to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA),  Faculty of Science, well before the beginning of the term in question. A current, detailed course syllabus must be provided. Please contact your Faculty Adviser for further information.

Please note that credit for statistics courses offered by faculties other than Arts and Science requires the permission of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science. Rules regarding statistics courses are clearly indicated in the eCalendar.

Courses offered by the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

If a course does not appear on the following list(s), you must obtain permission from the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science before registering for it.

Approved

AEBI 421 Trop. Horticultural Ecology
AEBI 423 Sustainable Land Use
AEBI 425 Tropical Energy and Food
AEBI 427 Barbados Interdisc Project
AEHM 330 Academic & Scientific Writing
AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 (See note in Calendar about overlap with other stats courses.)
AEMA 305 Differential Equations (Students must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
AGEC 200 Principles of Microeconomics (note that credit will not be given for both ECON 208 and AGEC 200)
AGEC 201 Principles of Macroeconomics (note that credit will not be given for both ECON 209 and AGEC 201)
AGEC 231 Econ Systems of Agriculture
AGEC 330 Agriculture and Food Markets
AGEC 430 Agric, Food & Resource Policy
AGEC 442 Econ of Int\'l Agric Dvlpmnt
AGRI 210 Agro-Ecological History
AGRI 215 Agro-Ecosystems Field Course
AGRI 325 Sustainable Agr&Food Security
AGRI 330 Agricultural Legislation
AGRI 340 Princ of Ecological Agricult
AGRI 341 course description not available
AGRI 411 Global Issues on Dev, Food&Agr
AGRI 413 course description not available
AGRI 435 Soil & Water Quality Mgmt
AGRI 452 Water Resources in Barbados
AGRI 519 Sustainable Development Plans
AGRI 550 Sustained Tropical Agriculture
ANSC 234 Biochemistry 2 (Students must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
ANSC 251 Comparative Anatomy
ANSC 312 Animal Health and Disease
ANSC 330 course description not available
ANSC 433 Animal Nutrition & Metabolism
ANSC 552 Protein Metabolism&Nutrition
ANSC 560 Biology of Lactation
BREE 217 Hydrology and Water Resources
CELL 500 course description not available
CELL 501 course description not available
ENTO 350 Insect Biology and Control (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science. Students may not receive credit for both ENTO 350 and BIOL 350)
ENTO 352 Biocontrol of Pest Insects
ENTO 440 Insect Diversity
ENTO 520 Insect Physiology
ENTO 535 Aquatic Entomology
ENVB 222 St. Lawrence Ecosystems
ENVB 315 Science of Inland Waters (Credit will not be given for both ENVB 315 and BIOL 432)
ENVB 410 Ecosystem Ecology
ENVB 437 Assessing Environmental Impact
ENVB 500 Advanced Topics Ecotoxicology
ENVB 506 Quantitative Methods: Ecology
FDSC 200 Introduction to Food Science
FDSC 230 Organic Chemistry (Credit will not be given for both FDSC 230 and CHEM 212)
FDSC 251 Food Chemistry 1
MICR 450 Environmental Microbiology
NRSC 201 course description not available
NRSC 300 course description not available
NRSC 315 course description not available (Credit will not be given for both NRSC 315 and BIOL 432)
NRSC 333 Pollution and Bioremediation
NRSC 340 Global Perspectives on Food
NRSC 437 course description not available
NRSC 405 Natural History of East Africa
NRSC 451 Res in Ecol&Develop in Africa (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science, and is cross listed with BIOL 451)
NUTR 301 Psychology (Note: credit will not be given for both NUTR 301 and PSYC 100)
NUTR 307 Metabolism and Human Nutrition (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science.)
NUTR 337 Nutrition Through Life
NUTR 341 Global Food Security
NUTR 343 Financial Mgmt and Accounting (Note: credit will not be given for both NUTR 343 and MGCR 211)
NUTR 361 Environmental Toxicology
NUTR 403 course description not available
NUTR 404 Nutr. Field St. in East Africa
NUTR 406 Ecology of Human Nutrition
NUTR 420 course description not available
NUTR 436 course description not available
NUTR 450 Research Meth: Human Nutrition
NUTR 451 course description not available
NUTR 501 Nutrition in Dev Countries
NUTR 512 Herbs, Foods&Phytochemicals
PARA 515 Water, Health and Sanitation 
PARA 410 Environment and Infection
PLNT 300 Cropping Systems
PLNT 304 Biology of Fungi
PLNT 305 Plant Pathology
PLNT 310 Plant Propagation
PLNT 312 Urban Horticulture
PLNT 331 course description not available
PLNT 353 Plant Structure and Function
PLNT 358 Flowering Plant Diversity
PLNT 361 course description not available
PLNT 424 course description not available
PLNT 434 Weed Biology and Control
PLNT 458 course description not available
PLNT 460 Plant Ecology
PLNT 525 course description not available
PLNT 535 course description not available
SOIL 200 course description not available
SOIL 210 Principles of Soil Science
SOIL 300 Geosystems (Note: Credit will not be given for both SOIL 300 and GEOG 272.)
SOIL 315 Soil Nutrient Management
SOIL 331 Environmental Soil Physics
SOIL 335 course description not available
SOIL 535 Ecological Soil Management
WILD 200 course description not available
WILD 205 course description not available
WILD 212 course description not available
WILD 302 Fish Ecology
WILD 307 Natural History of Vertebrates
WILD 311 course description not available
WILD 313 course description not available
WILD 350 Mammalogy
WILD 375 Issues:Environmental Sciences
WILD 401 Fisheries&Wildlife Management
WILD 410 course description not available
WILD 415 course description not available
WILD 420 Ornithology
WILD 421 Wildlife Conservation
WILD 424 course description not available (Credit will not be given for both WILD 424 and MIMM 413)
WILD 429 Ornithology
WILD 475 Desert Ecology
WOOD 410 course description not available
WOOD 441 Integrated Forest Management

Not approved

Note: Professional practice and techniques courses are normally closed to science students.
Note: Many Agricultural and Environmental Sciences courses may have substantial overlap with science courses. See Course Overlap Restrictions.

ABEN 251 Microcomputer Applications
ABEN 252 Structured Computer Programming
AEBI 210 Organisms 1
AEBI 211 Organisms 2
AEBI 212 Evolution and Phylogeny Approved for students in the Major or Honours Environment program
AEBI 306 Experiments in Biotechnology (not open to students in Biological Sciences, write for permission)
AEFR 306 Français Fonctionnel - Aliment et Nutrition
AEFR 307 Français Fonctionnel - Agriculture
AEHM 205 Science Literacy
AGEC 242 Management Theories and Practices
AGRI 195 Freshman Seminar 1
AGRI 196 Freshman Seminar 2
AGRI 482 Special Topics 3
ANSC 250 Principles of Animal Science
ANSC 565 Applied Information Systems
BREE 301 Biothermodynamics
BREE 314 Agricultural Structures
BREE 453 UG Seminar 3-ScientificWriting
BTEC 555 Structural Bioinformatics
ENVB 210 The Biophysical Environment (Science students should take GEOG 305 instead)
ENVB 301 Meteorology
ENVB 305 Population & Community Ecology
ENVB 415 Ecosystem Management
ENVB 530 Adv GIS for Natural Res Mgmt
EXTM 300 Communication - extension methods
LSCI 204 Genetics (was CELL 204) (not open to students in Biological Sciences, write for permission)
LSCI 211 Biochemistry 1 (was FDSC 211)
LSCI 230 Introductory Microbiology
NRSC 350 Biological Illustration I - approved only for students in Biology department programs AND in McGill School of Environment (MSE) (Biodiversity and Conservation Domain)
NRSC 351 Biological Illustration II
NUTR 200 Contemporary Nutrition
NUTR 207 Nutrition and Health (closed to students in biology and biomedical programs)
NUTR 214 Food Fundamentals
NUTR 217 Application of Food Fundamentals
NUTR 322 Applied Sciences Communication
NUTR 430 Directed Studies in Dietetics/Nutrition I (write for permission)
NUTR 431 Directed Studies in Dietetics/Nutrition II (write for permission)
PLNT 201 Comparative Plant Biology (not open to students in Biological Sciences, write for permission)
PLNT 211 Principles of Plant Science (not open to students in Biological Sciences, write for permission)
PLNT 221 Introduction to Fungi
PLNT 321 Fruit Production
PLNT 322 Greenhouse Management
PLNT 341 Horticulture - the Alliums
PLNT 342 Horticulture - Cole Crops
PLNT 343 Horticulture - Root Crops
PLNT 344 Horticulture - Salad Crops
PLNT 345 Horticulture: Solanaceous Crops
PLNT 348 The Brassicas
PLNT 421 Landscape Plant Materials
PLNT 450 Special Topics: Plant Science
PLNT 451 Special Topics: Plant Science 2
SOIL 342 course description not available

Courses offered by the School of Continuing Studies

Only Continuing Studies courses listed as Approved may be taken for credit. All others are not approved for credit.

CCE McGill Writing Centre (MWC) - approved

  • CEAP 150 Critical Analysis&Composition (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science)
  • CEAP 250 Research Essay & Rhetoric (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science)
  • CESL 150 English as a Second Language (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science)
  • CESL 200 ESL: Academic English 1 (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science)
  • CESL 299 ESL: Academic English Seminar (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science)
  • CESL 300 ESL: Academic English 2 (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science)
  • CESL 400 ESL: Essay & Critical Thinking (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science)
  • CESL 500 ESL: Research Essay & Rhetoric (Note: It is NOT considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science)
  • CCOM 314 Communicating Science (Note: This IS considered to be a course outside of Arts and Science)

Courses offered by the Faculty of Education

If a course does not appear on the following list(s), you must obtain permission from the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science before registering for it.

Approved

EDEC 233 Indigenous Education
EDEC 247 Policy Issues:QC&Indigenous Ed
EDEC 248 Equity and Education
EDEC 249 Global Ed. and Social Justice
EDEC 260 Philosophical Foundations
EDEC 261 course description not available
EDEC 262 Media, Tech. and Education
EDEC 300 Special Topics 1 (Students must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
EDEC 301 Special Topics 2 (Students must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
EDEM 220 Contemporary Issues in Ed.
EDER 209 Search for Authenticity
EDER 250 L. and T. the J Way of Life
EDER 309 The Religious Quest
EDER 324 course description not available
EDER 394 Philosophy of God
EDER 396 course description not available
EDER 406 course description not available
EDER 409 course description not available
EDER 410 Women in Higher Education
EDER 461 Society and Change
EDER 464 course description not available
EDER 491 course description not available
EDER 494 HumanRights&Ethics in Practice
EDER 499 Seminar on Women's Studies II
EDES 201 course description not available (requires permission from Faculty of Education)
EDES 335 Teaching Secondary Science 1 (approved only for students who complete the Minor in Education for Science students)
EDES 353 Teaching Sec. Mathematics 1 (approved only for students who complete the Minor in Education for Science students)
EDES 365 Experiences in Communications
EDES 366 Literature for Young Adults
EDKP 206 Biomechanics of Human Movement
EDKP 261 Motor Development
EDKP 303 course description not available (ANAT 214 is prerequisite)
EDKP 330 Physical Act & Public Health
EDKP 393 Skill Learning and Expertise (approved for Minor in Kinesiology)
EDKP 394 Historical Perspectives
EDKP 395 Exercise Physiology
EDKP 405 Sport in Society
EDKP 444 Ergonomics (ANAT 214 is prerequisite)
EDKP 445 Exercise Metabolism
EDKP 446 Physical Activity and Ageing
EDKP 447 Motor Control (ANAT 214 is prerequisite)
EDKP 448 Exercise and Health Psychology
EDKP 449 Neuromusc & Inflamm Pathophys
EDKP 485 Cardiopulmonary Ex Pathophys
EDKP 492 course description not available
EDKP 498 Sport Psychology
EDKP 505 course description not available
EDKP 542 Environmental Exercise Physiol
EDKP 566 Advanced Biomechanics Theory
EDPC 510 course description not available
EDPC 540 Socl Respblty&Relshps: Dig Age
EDPC 562 Career as a Lifelong Process
EDPE 300 Educational Psychology
EDPE 304 Measurement and Evaluation (approved only for students who complete the Minor in Education for Science students)
EDPE 335 Instructional Psychology
EDPE 355 Cognition and Education
EDPE 377 Adolescence and Education
EDPE 515 Gender Identity Development
EDPE 555 Socio-Cultural Fndns of LS
EDPE 560 course description not available
EDPI 309 Diverse Learners
EDPI 526 Supp. Stud. Strengths &Talent (provided students do a term paper for the major project)

Not approved

EDEA XXX None allowed
EDEC must write; see APPROVED list
EDEC 202: Effective Communication Faculty of Education
EDEC 203: Effective Communication Faculty of Education
EDEC 204: Communication in Social Work
EDEC 205: Communication in Management
EDEC 206: Communication in Engineering
EDEC 302 Language and Learning - Curriculum
EDEC 305 Communications for Management II
EDEC 310 Kindergarten/Elementary Curriculum
EDEC 402 Media, Technology and Education (closed to students except in certain programs)
EDEC 410 Multicultured/Multiracial Class (closed to students except in certain programs)
EDEC 500 Tutoring Writing: Theory and Practice
EDEE XXX None allowed
EDEM 405 Policy Issues in Quebec Education (closed to students except in certain programs)
EDEM 450 Curriculum Alternatives: Great Teaching in an Alternative Education Setting
EDER 208 Philosophy of Human Nature
EDER 252 Understanding and Teaching Jewish Living
EDER 332 Guiding the Religious Response - Elem.
EDER 473 Living with Insight
EDES XXX None allowed
EDET XXX None allowed
EDFE XXX None allowed
EDKP XXX ANY Physical Education course, such as Basketball, Wrestling, Rugby, Weight Training, etc.
EDKP 201 Fitness Leadership
EDKP 205 Structural Anatomy 
EDKP 211 First Aid
EDKP 225 Golf
EDKP 231 Martial Arts
EDKP 292 Nutrition and Wellness (students should take NUTR 307 instead; students with little background in Biology and Chemistry must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
EDKP 293 Anatomy and Physiology
EDKP 311 Athletic Injuries
EDKP 312 Aquatics
EDKP 331 Homeostatic Physiology
EDKP 391 Ergo-physiology (approved for students in Minor in Kinesiology)
EDKP 393 Skill Learning and Expertise (approved for students who are registered in the Minor in Kinesiology)
EDKP 396 Adapted Physical Activity (approved for students who are registered in the Minor in Kinesiology)
EDKP 485 Exercise in Chronic Health Conditions (approved for students in Minor in Kinesiology)
EDKP 492 Psychology of Motor Performance (replaced by EDKP 393 - approved for Minor in Kinesiology)
EDKP 495 Scientific Principles of Training (approved for students in Minor in Kinesiology)
EDKP 496 Adapted Physical Activity (approved for students in Minor in Kinesiology)
EDKP 550 Analyzing Instructional Behaviors
EDKP 553 Physiological Assessment in Sport
EDKP 568 Biomechanics Instruments
EDPC 501 Principles of Helping Rel.
EDPC 502 Group Processes and Individuals
EDPC 503 Human Sexuality: Professionals
EDPC 504 Practicum in Interviewing Skills
EDPC 505 Crisis/Trauma Intervention Processes
EDPC 508 Special Topics: Foundations of Family Life Education
EDPC 608 Group Counselling: Theory
EDPC 624 Group Counselling: Practice
EDPE 208 Personality and Social Development
EDPE 214 Child Development
EDPE 306 Values and Moral Education
EDPE 320 Adult Learning and Teaching
EDPE 394 Cognitive Development
EDPE 396 The Nature of Intelligence
EDPE 535 Instructional Design
EDPE 575 Educational Measurement
EDPE 596 Seminar in Special Topics
EDPI 211 Social & Emotional Development
EDPI 212 Perceptual Motor Development
EDPI 344 Assessment for Instruction
EDPI 440 Cog. & Psychomotor Prob. of Except. Chil.
EDPI 441 Behavioral Problems of Except. Chil.
EDPI 442 Psychology & Learning Problems
EDPI 527 Creativity and its Cultivation
EDPI 536 Practicum in Gifted Education I
EDPI 537 Practicum in the Gifted II
EDPI 539 Field Work I: Exceptional Students
EDPI 540 Field Work II: Exceptional Students
EDPI 543 Family, School and Community
EDPT XXX None allowed
EDSL XXX None allowed

Courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering

If a course does not appear on the following list(s), you must obtain permission from the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science before registering for it.

Approved

ARCH 250 Architectural History 1
ARCH 251 Architectural History 2
ARCH 252 course description not available
ARCH 253 course description not available
ARCH 355 Architectural History 4
ARCH 377 Energy, Environ, & Buildings 1
ARCH 385 course description not available
ARCH 515 Sustainable Design (Students must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
ARCH 522 course description not available
ARCH 523 Significant Texts & Buildings
ARCH 524 course description not available
ARCH 528 History of Housing
ARCH 529 Housing Theory
ARCH 536 Heritage Conservation
ARCH 541 Sel Topics in Architecture 2 (Must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
ARCH 551 Urban Design and Planning (Note this course is cross-listed as URBP 551)
CHEE 200 Chem Engineering Principles 1
CHEE 204 Chem Engineering Principles 2
CHEE 230 Envrnmntl Aspects of Technol
CHEE 291 Instrumentation&Measurement 1
CHEE 474 Biochemical Engineering 
CIVE 205 Statics
CIVE 323 Hydrology and Water Resources
CIVE 433 Urban Planning
CIVE 452 Water Resources in Barbados
CIVE 519 Sustainable Development Plans
CIVE 550 Water Resources Management
ECSE 200 Electric Circuits 1
ECSE 210 Electric Circuits 2
ECSE 221 course description not available (Credit will not be given for both ECSE 221 and COMP 273)
ECSE 321 Intro. to Software Engineering
ECSE 424 Human-Computer Interaction (Students must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
ECSE 427 Operating Systems
ECSE 429 Software Validation
ECSE 495 course description not available
ECSE 507 Optimization & Optimal Control
ECSE 526 Artificial Intelligence (Students must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
ECSE 539 Advanced Software Language Eng
MIME 260 Materials Science&Engineering
MIME 262 Prop.Materials in Elec. Eng.
MIME 308 Social Impact of Technology
MIME 310 course description not available
MIME 320 Extraction of Energy Resources
MIME 325 Mineral Industry Economics
MIME 329 Mining Geology
URBP 201 Planning the 21st Century City
URBP 506 Envrnmntl Policy and Planning
URBP 507 Planning and Infrastructure
URBP 506 Envrnmntl Policy and Planning
URBP 519 Sustainable Development Plans
URBP 520 Globaliz: Planning & Change
URBP 551 Urban Design and Planning (Note this course is cross-listed as ARCH 551)

Not approved

ARCH XXX generally not allowed with exceptions noted on APPROVED list.
CHEE 231 Data Anal & Design of Exp
CHEE 370 Elements of Biotechnology
CIVE 229 Surveying
ECSE 211 Design Principles and Methods
ECSE 291 Electrical Measurements Lab
ECSE 443 Introduction to Numerical Methods in Electrical Engineering
ECSE 508 Multi-Agent Systems (Students must write to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.)
FACC 100 Intro to the Eng. Profession
FACC 220 Law for Architects and Engineers
FACC 221 Engineering Professional Practice
MECH 201 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
MECH 220 Mechanics 2
MECH 260 Machine Tool Lab
MECH 261 Measurement Laboratory
MECH 262 Statistics and Measurement Laboratory
MECH 289 Design Graphics
MECH 553 Design and Manufacturing of Microdevices
MIME 221 Engineering Professional Practice
Note: Many Engineering courses may have substantial overlap with science courses. See Course Overlap Restrictions.

Courses offered by the Desautels Faculty of Management

All regular Management courses are approved with the exceptions listed below:

Not approved:

ORGB 423 Human Resource Management
ORGB 429 OB for Course Counsellors
ORGB 434 Topics in Organizational Behaviour 1

Statistics courses require the permission of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.

Computer and Information Systems courses are generally not approved for Science students; see list below.

INSY XXX None allowed

MGCR 331 Information Systems is approved for students enrolled in the course in Fall 2007 and in subsequent terms. It is not approved for students who were enrolled in the course before Fall 2007.

Courses offered by the Schulich School of Music

If a course does not appear on the following list(s), you must obtain permission from the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science before registering for it.

Approved

MUAR XXX (these are counted as Arts courses)
MUHL XXX
MUMT 201 Intro to Music Technologies
MUMT 202 Fundamentals of New Media
MUMT 203 Introduction to Digital Audio
MUMT 250 Music Perception and Cognition
MUMT 301 Music and the Internet
MUMT 302 New Media Production 1 (Approved only for students who complete the minor in Musical Applications of Technology)
MUMT 303 New Media Production 2 (Approved only for students who complete the minor in Musical Applications of Technology)
MUMT 306 Music & Audio Computing 1
MUMT 307 Music & Audio Computing 2
MUMT 402 Adv Multimedia Development
MUMT 501 Digital Aud. Signal Processing
MUMT 502 Senior Proj:Music Technology (Approved only for students who complete the minor in Musical Science and Technology)
MUPD 200 Intro to Music Marketing 
MUSP 240 Musicianship Training 3 (Approved only for students in the B.Sc. Liberal program who complete the B.A. Major Concentration in Music)
MUSP 241 Musicianship Training 4 (Approved only for students in the B.Sc. Liberal program who complete the B.A. Major Concentration in Music)
MUSR 200 Audio Recording Essentials (Approved only for students who complete the minor in Musical Applications of Technology)
MUSR 300D1 Intro to Music Recording (Approved only for students who complete the minor in Musical Applications of Technology)
MUSR 300D2 Intro to Music Recording (Approved only for students who complete the minor in Musical Applications of Technology)
MUTH XXX

Not approved

MUCT 235 Vocal Techniques

MUEN XXX None allowed
MUPD 201 Business Fundamentals for Musicians
MUPG XXX None allowed
MUJZ XXX None allowed
MUPP XXX None allowed (Science students in the BA Major Concentration Music should take MUHL courses as their complementary courses, instead of MUPP.)
MUSP XXX None allowed, (exceptions indicated in approved list)
MUSR 201 Audio Production Essentials

Students wishing to take Music courses that are not on either list above require permission from the Faculty of Music and from the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science.

3.2.3 Summer courses not approved for credit towards the B.Sc.

WARNING: THE COURSES LISTED BELOW HAVE BEEN ASSESSED, AND SCIENCE STUDENTS ARE NOT ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE CREDIT FOR THEM.

Courses offered by the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Food Science:

  • FDSC 480 Industrial Stage/Food

Nutrition and Dietetics:

  • NUTR xxx None allowed

Plant Science:

  • PLNT 450 Special Topics: Plant Science 1 (To be determined*)
  • PLNT 451 Special Topics: Plant Science 2 (To be determined*)

Courses offered by the Faculty of Education

Education: Arts Education:

  • EDEA xxx None allowed

Education: Curriculum and Instruction:

  • EDEC 201 First Year Professional Seminar
  • EDEC 215 English Language Requirement
  • EDEC 253 Second Professional Seminar (Kindergarten/Elementary)
  • EDEC 254 Second Professional Seminar (Secondary)

Education: Student Teaching:

  • EDFE xxx None allowed

Education: Kinesiology and Physical Education:

  • EDKP xxx None allowed

Education: Psychology and Counselling (Counselling):

  • EDPC xxx None allowed

Education: Psychology and Counselling (Psychology):

  • EDPE 575 Educational Measurement
  • EDPE 595 Seminar in Special Topics

Education: Psychology and Counselling (Inclusive):

  • EDPI 450 Computers and Special Needs
  • EDPI 543 Family, School and Community

Education: Psychology and Counselling (Media):

  • EDPT xxx None allowed

Education: Education in Second Languages:

  • EDSL xxx None allowed

Education: Education Teaching and Learning:

  • EDTL 508 Critical Influences on Educational Praxis (To be determined*)

Courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering

Civil Engineering:

  • CIVE xxx None allowed

FACC - Faculty Course:

  • FACC xxx None allowed

Mechanical Engineering:

  • MECH xxx None allowed

Mining, Metals, Materials Engr:

  • MIME 203 Mine Surveying
  • MIME 280 Industrial Training 1
  • MIME 290 Industrial Work Period 1
  • MIME 291 Industrial Work Period 2
  • MIME 317 Analytical and Characterization Techniques
  • MIME 350 Extractive Metallurgical Engineering
  • MIME 380 Industrial Training 2
  • MIME 392 Industrial Work Period 3
  • MIME 410 Research Project
  • MIME 419 Surface Mining
  • MIME 422 Mine Ventilation
  • MIME 480 Industrial Training 3
  • MIME 481 Industrial Training 4
  • MIME 494 Industrial Work Period 4

McGill/Poly Mining Coop:

  • MPMC xxx None allowed

Courses offered by the Desautels Faculty of Management

Business Admin:

  • BUSA 434 Topics in General Management

Management Core:

  • MGCR 271 Business Statistics

Marketing:

  • MRKT xxx None allowed

Courses offered by the Schulich School of Music

Musicianship:

  • MUSP xxx None allowed

Music Theory and Analysis

  • MUTH 151 Theory and Analysis 2 (To be determined*)
  • MUTH 475 Special Project

*For more information about courses listed as "To be determined", please contact Jane Hawes at: jane.hawes [at] mcgill.ca

3.3 Bachelor of Arts & Science students

The eCalendar is the definitive authority on the requirements you must meet in order to obtain a Bachelor of Arts & Science degree at McGill. Here are a few sections from the eCalendar frequently sought by B.A. & Sc. students.

Grading and grade point averages (GPA)

Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA)

Note for Physical and Occupational Therapy: A grade of C+ is a minimum required passing grade for courses with the subject codes of OCC1, PHTH, and POTH. A grade of C is a minimum required passing grade for all other courses. For complete details, refer to the Rules and Regulations, available at mcgill.ca/spot/programs.

Instructors may submit final grades as either letter grades or in percentages, but the official grade in each course, which displays on the transcript is the letter grade. Where appropriate, a class average appears on transcripts expressed as the letter grade most representative of the class performance. In such cases, the class average is calculated for courses, where the total number of grades in all of its course sections is 25 or more, and the grades have a grade point (e.g. grades of S, U or P don’t have grade points).

Since Fall 2002, the University has only used letter grades on transcripts and verification forms.

Grades A through C represent satisfactory passes, D a conditional (non-continuation) pass, and F a failure. Certain courses have been approved for Pass/Fail (P/F) grading. Students may also designate elective courses to be graded under the S/U option. See Courses Taken under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option.

You must obtain a grade of C or better in courses that you take to fulfil program requirements. You may not register in a course unless you have passed all the prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better, except by written permission of the appropriate department chair.

Grades Grade Points Numerical Scale of Grades
A 4.0 85 – 100%
A- 3.7 80 – 84%
B+ 3.3 75 – 79%
B 3.0 70 – 74%
B- 2.7 65 – 69%
C+ 2.3 60 – 64%
C 2.0 55 – 59%
D 1.0 50 – 54%
F (Fail) 0 0 – 49%
Note for Engineering: The Faculty of Engineering does not use this numeric scale. See Note for Engineering below.
Note for Law: Faculty of Law does not use this numeric scale.

The University assigns grade points to letter grades according to the table above. Your Academic Standing (e.g. satisfactory, probationary), which is your academic status at the end of each term, is determined by a grade point average (GPA), which is calculated by multiplying the course credit by the grade points, and dividing the sum by the total course GPA credits. The GPA result is truncated by two decimal points and not rounded up to the nearest decimal point. For example, a GPA of 3.596 will display on the transcript as 3.59 and is NOT rounded up to 3.60.

GPA credits are the credits of courses with grades that are assigned grade points.

The term grade point average (TGPA) is the GPA for a given term calculated using all the applicable courses at the same level in that term. The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is the GPA calculated using your entire record of applicable courses at McGill at the same level; if you change levels, e.g., from undergraduate to graduate, the CGPA starts again.

This policy took effect in January 2003. Prior to January 2003, if your degree program had changed, e.g., from B.Sc. to B.A., the CGPA calculation restarted again. For students with academic information prior to Fall 2002, who are registered in a different program or in a different level post-Fall 2002, the transcript displays a special message regarding the CGPA restarting.

If you repeat courses, all final grades are included in the GPA calculation. Therefore, grades of D or F continue to be used in the CGPA calculation even after you repeat the course or if you take a supplemental examination. Note that credits are only granted once for a repeated course regardless of the passing grade.

You must obtain a minimum CGPA of 2.00 to be considered for graduation with a McGill degree.

Note: During the first week of lectures, each instructor will provide you with a written course outline. This information should include, where appropriate:
  • whether there will be a final examination in the course;
  • how term work will affect the final grade in the course;
  • how term work will be distributed through the term;
  • whether there will be a supplemental examination in the course, and if so, whether the supplemental exam will be worth 100% of the supplemental grade, or whether term work will be included in the supplemental grade (courses with formal final examinations must have supplementals);
  • whether students with grades of D, F, J, or U will have the option of submitting additional work, and, if so, how the supplemental grade will be calculated with the extra work (applicable only to students in Science and B.A. & Sc.).
Note for Engineering: In the Faculty of Engineering, letter grades are assigned according to the grading scheme adopted by the professor in charge of a particular course. This may not correspond to grades indicated in the “Numerical Scale of Grades” column in Grading and Grade Point Averages. A grade of D indicates marginal performance which is acceptable only for Complementary Studies courses (i.e., Group A Impact of Technology on Society and Group B Humanities and Social Sciences, Management Studies and Law), Natural Science Complementary Courses (for Computer Engineering and Software Engineering students from CEGEP), and Elective Courses (for Mechanical Engineering students from CEGEP and for Architecture students). A grade of D is not acceptable for required (core) courses (including Year 0 (Freshman) math and science courses), technical complementary courses, laboratory complementary courses, or courses in any other category of the Engineering programs. Individual departments/schools will decide if a student with a D in a prerequisite course(s) may take the subsequent course.
Grades have the following designations:
A, A- Very Good
B+, B, B- Good
C+, C Satisfactory
D Conditional Pass
F Fail
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 16, 2021).

Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA): Other Grades

Note: Not all grades listed below apply to every faculty, school or level. Faculty policy prevails when determining if a student may be eligible to receive one of these grades.
Other Grades

J

unexcused absence (failed); the student is registered for a course but does not write the final examination or do other required work; calculated as a failure in the TGPA and CGPA

K

incomplete; instructor has extended the deadline for submission of work in a course

KE or K*

further extension granted for submission of work in a course, approval from the Faculty SAO may be required

KF

failed to meet the extended deadline for submission of work in a course; calculated as a failure in TGPA and CGPA

KK

completion requirement waived; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA; Associate Dean approval is required.

L

approved to write a deferred examination in a course

LE or L*

permitted to defer examination for more than the normal period

NR

no grade reported by the instructor (recorded by the Registrar)

P

pass; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA

Q

course continued in next term (applicable only to courses taken pre-Fall 2002)

S

satisfactory; equivalent to C or better in an elective course; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA (See Courses Taken under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option)

U

unsatisfactory; equivalent to D or F in an elective course; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA (See Courses Taken under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option)

W

withdrew; a course dropped, with permission, after the Course Change deadline; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA

WF

withdrew failing; a course dropped, with special permission in an exceptional case, after faculty deadline for withdrawal from course, the student's performance in the course at that stage being on the level of an F; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA (Not used by Music.)

WL

faculty permission to withdraw from a deferred examination; not calculated in TGPA or CGPA

NA or &&

grade not yet available

W- - or - -

no grade; student withdrew from the University, not calculated in TGPA or CGPA (applicable only to courses taken pre-Fall 2002)

Note for Physical and Occupational Therapy: Grades of S/U are not applicable.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 16, 2021).

Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA): Unexcused Absences

All students who miss a final exam or do not complete other final work in a course are given a J grade. You then have the following options:

  1. Ask to be assigned a grade based only on the grades earned for your work submitted up to, but not including, the final exam or final course work.

    The grade earned is calculated by adding the grades obtained on the individual pieces of work and a grade of 0 for the portion of the final grade allocated to the final exam or final course work. This option is not available if the professor stipulated in the course outline that the final exam is a required part of the evaluation.

  2. Request a deferred exam, if you have the appropriate reasons and documentation.
  3. Apply for a supplemental exam if permitted by your faculty.
Note for Engineering: Option 1 is not available to students in the Faculty of Engineering.
Note for Law: Option 1 is not available to students in the Faculty of Law. Option 3 is by approval of the Associate Dean (Academic) or the Director (Student Life & Learning) only.
Note for Music: Option 1 is not available to students in the Schulich School of Music.

You must request option 1 no later than four months after the end of the examination period of the original course.

You must request option 2 by the faculty deadlines as indicated in University Regulations & Resources > Undergraduate > Examinations: General Information > Final Examinations > Final Examinations: Deferred Examinations.

You must request option 3 by the faculty deadlines as indicated at mcgill.ca/exams.

If you wish to appeal a J grade, you should write to your Associate Dean or Director.

Note for the Faculties of Arts and Science (including B.A. & Sc.): Requests are made at Service Point (3415 McTavish Street). However, it is important that you also see a Faculty adviser in Arts OASIS or SOUSA to talk about your options and the effects that your request may have on your studies. For more information, see mcgill.ca/students/advising.
Note for Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies: Only options 2 and 3 above are applicable to graduate students. Students wishing to appeal a J grade should write to the Associate Registrar, Management of Academic Records.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Mar. 16, 2021).

Minimum credit requirement

Minimum Credit Requirement for Bachelor of Arts and Science

You must complete the minimum credit requirement for the degree as specified in your letter of admission.

Students are normally admitted to a four-year degree requiring the completion of 120 credits, but Advanced Standing of up to 30 credits may be granted if you obtain satisfactory results in the Diploma of Collegial Studies, International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, and Advanced Placement tests.

If you are readmitted after interrupting your studies for a period of five consecutive years or more, you may be required to complete a minimum of 60 credits and satisfy the requirements of a program. In this case, a new GPA will be calculated. The Director of Advising Services, Science, in consultation with the appropriate department, may approve a lower minimum for students who had completed 60 credits or more before interrupting their studies.

If you are readmitted after a period of absence, you are normally subject to the program and degree requirements in effect at the time of readmission.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Residency requirement

Residency Requirement for Bachelor of Arts and Science Degree

To obtain a B.A. & Sc., you must satisfy the following residency requirements: a minimum of 60 credits of courses used to satisfy the B.A. & Sc. requirements must be taken and passed at McGill, exclusive of any courses completed as part of the math and science requirements of the B.A. & Sc. Freshman program. At least two-thirds of all departmental program requirements (Multi-track, Honours, Interfaculty) must normally be completed at McGill, not including courses completed in a prior McGill degree. Exceptionally, students in major concentrations or interfaculty or honours programs who pursue an approved Study Away or Exchange program may, with prior approval from both their department and the Associate Dean, Student Affairs, Faculty of Science, be exempted from the two-thirds rule. In addition, some departments may require that their students complete specific components of their program at McGill.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Time and credit limit for the completion of the degree

Time and Credit Limit for Completion of the Degree for Bachelor of Arts and Science

If you need 96 or fewer credits to complete your degree requirements, you are expected to complete your degree in no more than eight terms after your initial registration. If you are a student in the Freshman program, you become subject to these regulations one year after your initial registration. If you need or want to exceed this time limit, you must receive permission from the Director of Advising Services, Science, to continue your studies.

If you are registered in the B.A. & Sc., you are expected to complete the requirements of your program and your degree within 120 credits. You will receive credit for all courses (subject to degree regulations) taken up to and including the semester in which you obtain 120 credits. If you want to remain at McGill beyond that semester, you must also seek permission of the Director of Advising Services, Science. Permission for exceeding the time and/or credit limits will normally be granted only for valid academic reasons, such as a change of program (subject to departmental approval) and part-time status. If permission is granted, you will receive credit only for required and complementary courses necessary to complete program requirements.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

Program requirements

Departmental Programs for Bachelor of Arts and Science Degree

If you are pursuing a B.A. & Sc., other than those registered in the Freshman program, you are required to have an approved program (multi-track, honours, joint honours, interfaculty), and to select your courses in each term with a view to timely completion of your degree and program requirements. You must complete one of the program streams described below.

The B.A. & Sc. degree includes a required integrative course (BASC 201, 3 credits), plus electives (10–15 credits).

Multi-Track System

To recognize the diversity of student backgrounds and interests, and the multiple routes to understanding provided by a modern university, the Faculties of Arts and of Science offer a 90-credit multi-track system that includes a major concentration in one faculty complemented by a major concentration in the other faculty (see below):

Option
  • Arts Major Concentration (36 credits) + Science Major Concentration (36–38 credits) (see Overview of Programs Offered for a list of programs open to students in the B.A. & Sc.)

    * Effective September 2013, the multi-track option to complete two minors or two minor concentrations is no longer available. Only one multi-track option remains.

Regulations
  • Programs offered by Computer Science, Mathematics and Statistics, and Psychology are considered Science programs for the purpose of the B.A. & Sc. Exceptionally, you may take a Geography program in both Arts and Science.
  • Students will include within the 36 credits of their major concentrations any university-level (200 or above) prerequisites to required courses within their programs.
  • No course may fulfil the requirements for more than one program.
Definitions
  • Units: academic departments or administrative equivalents
  • Programs: lists of required and complementary courses (including university-level prerequisites for required courses) prepared and maintained by units
  • Major Concentration: a program of 36–38 credits taken from a unit's course offerings

Honours Program

Honours programs demand a high degree of specialization, and require you to satisfy specific departmental and Faculty Honours requirements while maintaining good Academic Standing. They are designed to prepare you for graduate study. Students in the B.A. & Sc. who complete an approved honours program must also complete an approved minor concentration or a minor in the Faculties of Arts or of Science. You must complete at least 21 credits in the Faculty of Arts and at least 21 credits in the Faculty of Science as part of your honours program and your minor concentration or minor program. See Honours Programs for a list of available programs.

To choose the Honours option, you must meet the GPA/CGPA requirements set out in University Regulations and Resources > Undergraduate > Graduation > Graduation Honours > Honours and First-Class Honours for Faculties of Arts and Science (including B.A. & Sc.).

Joint Honours Program

If you want to study at the honours level in two disciplines, you can combine a joint honours program component from an Arts discipline with one from a Science discipline; see Joint Honours Programs for a list of available programs. Each joint honours component consists of a maximum of 36–38 required and complementary credits (not including program prerequisites). In cases where a minimum of 24 credits are in courses normally restricted to Honours students, the total of required and complementary credits may be as few as 30.

To choose the Joint Honours option, you must meet the GPA/CGPA requirements set out in University Regulations and Resources > Undergraduate > Graduation > Graduation Honours > Honours and First-Class Honours for Faculties of Arts and Science (including B.A. & Sc.).

Interfaculty Program

An interfaculty program is an approved selection of courses constituting a concentration in an intellectually coherent and interfaculty field of studies. These courses must include approved selections from the Faculties of Arts and of Science and possibly other faculties. See Interfaculty Programs for a list of approved programs. Students in the B.A. & Sc. who complete an approved interfaculty program must also complete an approved minor concentration or a minor in the Faculties of Arts or of Science. You must complete at least 21 credits in the Faculty of Arts and at least 21 credits in the Faculty of Science as part of your interfaculty program and your minor concentration or minor program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

3.3.1 Integrative course

The B.A. & Sc. degree includes a required integrative course (BASC 201, 3 credits).

The Integrative course may also be used to fulfill the requirements of one of the B.A. & Sc. programs or may be considered as elective credit.

3.3.2 Restrictions on courses outside the faculties of Arts and Science

There are limits on how many credits students in the B.A. & Sc. degree take outside of the faculties of Arts and Science. Refer to:

Click to see the eCalendar regulations on taking courses outside the faculties of Arts and Science

Courses Outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science

The following regulations apply to students in the B.A. & Sc. who want to take courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science:

  • Regardless of your minimum credit requirement toward your B.A. & Sc., you are allowed a maximum of 12 credits in ELECTIVE and/or COMPLEMENTARY courses taken in faculties other than the Faculties of Arts and of Science.
  • Students in certain designated programs that include a number of REQUIRED and COMPLEMENTARY courses in other faculties are permitted a maximum of 30 credits outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science. These programs are the Interfaculty and Honours programs in Environment, the Minor concentration in Environment, the Interfaculty and Honours programs in Sustainability, Science and Society, and the Major concentration in Geography (Urban Studies).
  • Any courses taught at McGill University may be used toward the maximum allowed, except for courses taught by the School of Continuing Studies, for which you receive credits only in Continuing Studies. Courses taught by the McGill Writing Centre are excluded from this rule and can count for credit in your degree (see the SOUSA website for a list of approved courses: mcgill.ca/science/undergraduate/handbook#basc-continuing).
  • For the purpose of this policy, courses taught in other faculties and specifically listed in Faculty of Arts > Undergraduate or Faculty of Science > Undergraduate are considered as courses taught in the Faculties of Arts and of Science.
  • The maximum number of credits allowed will be strictly enforced.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2021-2022 (last updated Feb. 12, 2021).

3.3.3 School of Continuing Studies courses within a B.A. & Sc. degree

Continuing Studies courses with subject numbers that do not start with a C can be taken for credit towards your B.A. & Sc. degree.

The exceptions to this rule are as follows. These courses can be taken for credit:

  • CHEM 18X World of Chemistry X
  • CEAP 250 Research Essay & Rhetoric
  • CESL 150 English as a Second Language
  • CESL 200 ESL: Academic English 1
  • CESL 299 ESL: Academic English Seminar
  • CESL 300 ESL: Academic English 2
  • CESL 400 ESL: Essay & Critical Thinking
  • CESL 500 ESL: Research Essay & Rhetoric

You may register for Continuing Studies courses for credit on Minerva according to the dates indicated on the Minerva web site for the summer, fall and winter terms.

Registering for a Continuing Studies course not for credit

  • Continuing Studies courses with subject numbers that start with C (except those listed above) are not for credit towards your B.A. & Sc. degree.
  • In order to register, you should go to the School of Continuing Studies at 688 Sherbrooke St. West.
  • Make the appropriate arrangements with the School, and their staff will add the course to your record.
  • You will not be able to request credit for these courses at a later date toward your B.A. & Sc. degree.

4. Study Abroad Options

 

Studying away from McGill is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity whose benefits can go far beyond academic learning. The opportunity to study at another university can add significant dimensions to your undergraduate education by enabling you to develop broader perspectives on your fields of study, to enhance skills in cross-cultural communication and critical thinking applicable to your everyday life and provide you with a chance for personal growth.

Graduating students

Students who are on any type of study away during their graduating term WILL NOT be able to graduate at the end of their final term; instead, these students must select a graduation term (on Minerva) for the term following their Study Away, Exchange, etc.

Note to American students regarding Federal Student Aid:

Students who are taking distance education (online courses), research abroad, Official McGill Exchange or a Study Abroad program, please review the rules and regulations on the Scholarships and Student Aid website or go to the Scholarships and Student Aid office, Brown Building.

Study-away advising sessions

Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts & Science students: If you have SPECIFIC questions concerning your Study Abroad options which are NOT answered on this website, please schedule an advising session with the relevant adviser mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier) if you are a B.Sc. student, or tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (Tania Raggo) if you are a B.A. & Sc. student. For Fall 2020 and Winter 2021 advising will be done via Zoom.

4.1 McGill Student Exchange Programs
 

FALL 2021 Term Exchanges are officially cancelled.

Winter 2022 Exchanges: More information will be available as soon as possible.

Exchange Applications:

  • Winter 2022 ONLY.
    Exchange application on Minerva application is currently closed.  More information will be available shortly.

Students will need to review a pre-recorded presentation on "How to apply for an exchange" before attending an Q & A session via zoom.  Sessions will begin in late March, 2021. You will need to register for the Q & A Session:

As of the Summer 2011 term, students who are on any type of study away during their graduating term WILL NOT be able to graduate at the end of their final term; instead, these students must select their graduation flag (on Minerva) for the term following their study away.

Note to American students regarding federal student aid: students who are taking distance education (online courses), research abroad, Official McGill Exchange or a Study Abroad program, please review the rules and regulations on the Scholarships and Student Aid website or go to the Scholarships and Student Aid office, Brown Building.

McGill Student Exchange Programs are established tuition agreements between McGill and various host universities whereby students exchange places for one or two terms (excluding summer term). For these programs you pay your tuition to McGill while studying abroad.

When embarking on an exchange program it is a good idea to have a well thought-out plan. Please read the following steps, including the related links concerning policies and regulations, to ensure your participation in a McGill Exchange program is rewarding and successful.

Step 1: What factors should I consider when planning my exchange program?

The best time to participate in an exchange program is during the year before your graduating year, your U2 year. This would give you the opportunity to complete at least one year in your program(s) of study at McGill prior to departure. You would return to McGill with an enriched educational perspective to complete your remaining degree and program requirements.

1. Consider the following before going on an exchange program:

Studying away can have a significant impact on your academic career. The following are some questions you should be asking:

  • What is the language of instruction at the host university?
  • Do you want to study away for a year or one term?
  • How many credits do you have to complete for your degree and for each of your declared programs?
  • When do you expect to graduate? Will you graduate within the degree time limit?
  • Will you exceed your minimum credit requirement?
  • If your course selection is unavailable at the host university will you be "out of step" with your program requirements upon returning to McGill?
  • Are you on a student visa; and if so, when does it expire?
  • Will you have to extend your degree at McGill if you don't receive as many transfer credits as expected, or as many direct course equivalences as expected?

2. Review Faculty policies:

Since your participation in an exchange program may be affected by certain faculty policies, use the following links to read and understand about Science or B.A. & Sc. course and degree requirements:

General degree requirements:

3. Review  Transfer credit policy.

4. Meet with your departmental academic adviser(s):

You are strongly encouraged to make an appointment with each of your departmental advisers to discuss your plans to participate in an exchange program. Consult the Program Adviser list for names and email addresses for each program and/or department.

With your adviser(s):

  • discuss your selected host university and courses;
  • discuss your required and complementary courses, and any alternatives, which will count toward your departmental programs at McGill. Discuss elective courses and possible exemptions from specific McGill courses as a result of your exchange program;
  • determine the status of your McGill program requirements. In other words, which courses have you completed and which remain to be completed? Can they be completed at another university? Are you abiding to the "1/3 credit rule"?

Step 2: How do I select an appropriate institution?

Step 3: What are the criteria to apply?

In order to be considered for an exchange program, at the time of your application, you must:

  • be currently registered in a full-time Bachelor of Science or Bachelor Arts and Science program at McGill (with your program(s) of study accurately reflected on Minerva);
  • have a CGPA of 3.0 or greater (and maintain it during all terms leading to the exchange term);
  • have completed a minimum of 12 graded McGill credits at the time of application; and
  • have completed a minimum of 24 graded McGill credits prior to the start of the exchange program.
  • Students wishing to go on Exchange for Winter 2022, will apply on the Exchange Minerva Module from April 15, 2021 to June 15, 2021.
  • It is also recommended to attend an information session.  The details are listed above.

Step 4: Is it possible to obtain funding?

Start thinking early about applying for funds to study abroad. There is a wide range of options available to you but you must be pro-active in your research and planning. For example, learn if you could tap into funds through federal or provincial-level government loans and bursary programs, foundations or private and public organizations. Inquire about the various application criteria and deadlines.

The following is a list of some organizations you could review for possible funding options.

Note to American students regarding federal student aid: While on official exchange from McGill you are considered to be a full-time McGill student for U.S. Direct Loan purposes. Please be aware that regulations by the U.S. Department of Education states that you can receive U.S. Direct Loans only if attending a school that participates in the U.S. Direct Loan program, and the school is located outside of the U.S. For more information, please visit the Scholarships and Student Aid website.

Step 5: How do I apply?

1. Consult the instructions from the McGill Abroad website.  There are 8 steps to review

2. Submit the Minerva Exchange Application form:

  • Winter 2022: Exchange application on Minerva application is currently closed. More information will be available shortly.

There is a non-refundable application fee of $150 chargeable to your Student Account upon submitting an application.

3. Submit additional information:

  • If you are currently in your  'Year U3', final year of studies (according to your transcript on Minerva) you must write a letter of appeal explaining why you are requesting to go on exchange at this time.

    You must also provide a term-by-term outline of program and elective courses you will be completing upon your return to McGill. The purpose of this list is to ensure that you will not be exceeding your minimum credit requirement and/or the degree time limit.

    If required, explain why your degree and/or program requirements could not be completed within the time normally allotted and why you require an extension. Send this information to mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier), (B.Sc.) and tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (Tania Raggo )(B.A.& Sc.)

Applications missing this additional information will not be processed.

4. Confirm your approval status:

In order to be considered for nomination to the host partner, you must first be granted Faculty Approval by SOUSA. Your application will be evaluated for the required academic criteria and will be granted a status of 'Approved' or 'Not Approved' in the 'Faculty Application Status' field of your Minerva Exchange Application. This is the first level of approval.

5. Nomination by the McGill Exchange Office at Service Point:

If your application was granted Faculty Approval, the McGill Exchange Office will review your application for nomination to the partner university. You must accept or decline the nomination on Minerva by the specified deadline.  This is a second level of approval. If your nomination is accepted by the partner university you will be contacted by email by the Exchange Office with details on how to apply to the host University.

Step 6: What should I do once my application has been accepted?

Only once you have been sent the offer of admission by the partner university (only a few months before you actual go on exchange), follow these steps:

Course Equivalency System

All courses taken abroad (outside of McGill) must be approved using the Course Equivalency System.

Search the database to determine if the course you want to take has already been approved. You may want to use the “External” course number and then “Country” or “Institution” to determine if the course has already been approved. Make sure you also tick off “Include Expired Decisions”. The course may have already been approved, but might be expired, which means you will have to request a “Reassessment”.

If the course is not on the course database, then you must login (using your McGill email address and password) and “Submit a Request”. For further information on using the system, please go to Frequently asked questions.

Once you have made an exchange application, you will then have access to the Minerva Transfer Credit Assessment Form” (replaces the Course Approval Form). Only courses that appear on the Course Equivalency System can be added to the Transfer Credit Assessment Form. For further information, please refer to the Help Field on Minerva.

You cannot assume that you will receive 3 credits for a course equivalency even if the course is 3 credits at McGill. The Faculty of Science has the right to request a course syllabus (even if the course is approved on the course equivalency system). The Faculty of Science has the final approval for all courses taken by a Faculty of Science (or B.A. & Sc.) student taken outside of McGill.

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier) if you are a B.Sc. student, or tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (Tania Raggo) if you are a B.A. & Sc. student.

Attend a mandatory Pre-departure Information Session:

Students will be invited by email to attend a Pre-departure Info Session.

Register on the mandatory Minerva International Travel Registry form

McGill requires all of its students who are studying away to fill out the Travel Registry form. This enables McGill to contact and possibly evacuate students in case of an emergency, either in Canada or in the host country. You will be notified by email once you have been coded as "Term Exchange" with the instructions on how to fill out this Minerva form.

Step 7: What should I do while I am at the partner university?

1. Keep all course materials:

You may need to refer to the course syllabus, exam questions, graded work, methods of evaluation, reading lists, etc. for final course approvals with your department adviser upon your return to McGill.

2. Regularly check your McGill email:

The SOUSA staff will email all correspondence including important notices and information about registration, fees, graduation, etc., to your McGill email account.

Step 8: How and when are my credits transferred to my McGill record?

Once your studies at the host university are completed, you must request an official transcript will be mailed to the McGill Exchange Office.

Please refer to the SOUSA Transfer Credit Policy for details about how transfer credits are approved and processed.

Step 9: If I decide not to go, should I cancel my application?

In order to cancel your exchange, you must fill out the appropriate webform Request to Cancel Exchange term (Note: The exchange application fee is non-refundable.)

4.2 Study at a Québec university: AEHE-Inter-University Transfer (IUT including online courses)

There are two options for studying at another university in Québec for credit towards your McGill Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts & Science degree:

  1. Registering for one or two courses per term at the host university in addition to your McGill courses in the same term using the AEHE-IUT (Autorisation d'études hors établissement) website.
  2. Registering for a full course load at the host university without taking any McGill courses in the same term using the AEHE-IUT website.

NOTE: U3 STUDENTS: If you are participating in any type of study away (including IUT) during your final U3 term, (even if you are taking only one course outside of McGill) you will not be able to graduate at the end of the term and must select the term of graduation (on Minerva) after your term away.

Step 1: What factors should I consider before applying for a course at another Quebec University?

1. Consider the following before applying:

Studying away can have a significant impact on your academic career. The following are some questions you should be asking:

  • What is the language of instruction at the host university?
  • How many credits do you have to complete for your degree and for each of your program(s)?
  • When do you expect to graduate? Will you graduate within the degree time limit?
  • Will you exceed your minimum credit requirement?
  • If your course selection is unavailable at the host university will you be "out of step" with your program requirements upon returning to McGill?
  • Will you have to extend your degree at McGill if you don't receive as many transfer credits as expected, or as many direct course equivalences as expected?

2. Review Faculty Policies:

It is your responsibility to read and understand Faculty policies and regulations. A lack of knowledge or understanding of these policies will not be grounds for an appeal later on. Since certain faculty policies may affect your course selection, read over the following information very carefully:

General course requirements

General degree requirements:

3. Meet with your Program Adviser(s):

You are strongly encouraged to make an appointment with each of your program advisers to discuss your plans to study at another university. Consult the Program Advisers for a list of adviser names and email addresses for each program and/or department.

With your adviser(s):

  • discuss your selected host university and courses you want to register for.
  • discuss your required and complementary courses, and any alternatives, which will count toward your departmental programs at McGill.
  • determine the status of your McGill program requirements. In other words, which courses have you completed and which remain to be completed? Can they be completed at another university? Are you abiding to the "1/3 credit rule"?

Step 2: What are the criteria for acceptance?

You must be a student in the Bachelor of Science, or the Bachelor of Arts and Science, and registered in a departmental program. You must have a CGPA of 2.00 or greater.

NOTE: Exchange, Special, Visiting or Freshman (U0) students are not eligible to apply.

Step 3: What about online courses? Can I use them towards my degree?

You are allowed a maximum of 6 online credits to be used towards the fulfillment of the elective requirements of your degree.

Before registering, however, you must seek prior approval of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs. Please submit your written request to the mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier) (B.Sc.) or tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (Tania Raggo) (B.A.&Sc.) In your email indicate your reasons for taking this online course and attach a current course syllabus which includes the method of evaluation.

You will also have to get the course approved using the Course equivalency System.

Step 4: How do I go about making an AEHE-IUT application?

Watch this short VIDEO on how to use the new AEHE-IUT form.

  • Get your courses assessed for equivalency on the McGill Course Equivalency System. All courses must be evaluated.
  • Complete the online AEHE-IUT form:  All courses entered on the AEHE-IUT application must be evaluated and approved on the McGill Course Equivalency System before submitting the form.

NOTE:  If the course is assessed as a level equivalency ex: BIOL 3XX or PSYC 2XX, please put this course in the comment section of your application.

  • Register at the host university.  Once the course you wish to take is approved by both the host university and McGill Enrollment Services, you will be required to register for the course(s) at the host university following the registration instructions provided by the host university.
     

Step 5: What are the deadlines to apply?

Your AEHE-IUT application must be submitted prior to the start of the term to allow enough time to meet the host university's registration deadlines. These are strict deadlines:

for the Summer term: by April 15th for May term
by May 15th for June term
by June 15th for July term
for the Fall term: by August 15th
for the Winter term: by December 15th

Step 6: What happens once my IUT application has been approved at McGill?

1. Await the host university's approval:

Once McGill has approved your application, the host university will inform you of their decision by email.

2. Register at the host university:

If your application is approved by the host university, you will receive instructions on how to register at the host university.

Step 7: How and to whom do I pay my tuition fees?

The tuition fees for the course(s) at the host university will be charged to your McGill account.

Step 8: What should I do while I am at the host university?

1. Keep all course materials:

You may need to refer to course syllabus, exam questions, graded work, methods of evaluation, reading lists, etc. for discussion about course approvals with your department adviser.

2. Regularly check your McGill email:

The SOUSA office will email all correspondence including important notices and information about registration, fees, graduation, etc., to your McGill email account.

3. Register for McGill courses for the upcoming term:

If you expect to return to McGill for the upcoming term, be sure to register for your McGill courses by appropriate deadlines to avoid any late registration fees.

Step 9: What should I do when I return to McGill (if applicable)?

1. Have you registered for your McGill courses?

Access Minerva to register for courses and to verify that your registration for your term back at McGill is accurate.

2. Have you updated your contact information?

If you have changed residence or telephone number, please ensure that you update your contact information on Minerva so that we can contact you about any issues regarding your study away or your McGill registration.

Step 10: How and when are my credits transferred to my McGill record?

1. Ensure that your grade(s) have been submitted to McGill:

For any course(s) you complete at the host university, the grade(s) will be automatically submitted to McGill. If you login to your AEHE-IUT application and read "Grade transmitted to Home University", this is your confirmation that McGill has received the grade(s). Should you have any questions about the submission of your grade, please contact the host university.

McGill's Enrolment Services, in coordination with our office, will process the transfer credits to your McGill transcript on a priority and volume-based system.

NOTE: U3 STUDENTS: As of the Summer 2011, if you are participating in any type of study away/exchange (including IUT) during your final U3 term, you will not be able to graduate at the end of the term and must select the term of graduation (on Minerva) after your term away.

2. Refer to the SOUSA Transfer Credit Policy:

Please refer to the SOUSA Transfer Credit Policy for details about how transfer credits are approved and processed.

Step 11: If I decide not to go after all, should I cancel my application?

If you wish to drop or withdraw from a course after registering at the host Québec university, you must follow the drop/withdrawal procedures at the host university and submit this change on the AEHE-IUT application. Otherwise, you will continue to be registered for the course, and you will receive failing grades at the end of term, as well as be charged fees.

4.3 Independent Study Away

Important Announcement:

Independent Study Away for Fall 2021 is Cancelled


Due to the ongoing barriers to international travel as well as the Canadian government’s current travel and health advisories, indicating that all non-essential travel outside of Canada should be avoided until further notice, McGill has made the difficult decision to cancel all outbound international exchanges and terms away for the Summer 2021 and Fall 2021 terms.

Minerva study away application is closed until further notice.  There is no decision for Winter 2022 study away.
 

U3 STUDENTS: If you are participating in any type of study away/exchange during your final U3 term, YOU WILL NOT be able to graduate at the end of your final term and must select the term of graduation (on Minerva) AFTER your term away.

Term Away Select Graduation term of
Fall Winter term (June Graduation/Convocation)
Winter Summer term (November Graduation/Convocation)

Note to American students regarding federal student aid: students who are taking distance education (online courses), research abroad, Official McGill Exchange or a Study Abroad program, please review the rules and regulations on the Scholarships and Student Aid website or go to the Scholarships and Student Aid office, Brown Building.

ALL STUDENTS: Please ensure that the host university mails your official transcript to: Enrolment Services, Student Records, McGill University, 3415 McTavish Street, Room MS 13, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3A 0C8.

The Independent Study Away (on your own) option allows you the flexibility to choose the country and institution where you wish to study. Before embarking on an Independent Study Away program it is a good idea to have a well thought-out plan. Please read the following steps, including the related links concerning policies and regulations, to ensure your experience is rewarding and successful.

Step 1: Planning process and regulations

The ideal time to pursue an independent study away program is during your U2 year, before your graduating year. This would give you the opportunity to complete at least one year in your program(s) of study at McGill prior to departure. You would return to McGill with an enriched educational perspective to complete your remaining degree requirements.

Although not recommended, you may study away during your final U3 year; refer below to "B. Consider the following before Studying Away".

A. Research Your Intended Destination: Extensively research the universities and countries you are considering. Review websites, university catalogues, talk to your professors and colleagues who are from or have studied in these countries/geographical areas. If host university representatives visit McGill campus, make it a point to attend their information sessions.

B. Consider the following before Studying Away: Studying away can have significant impact on your academic career. Some questions you should be asking:

  • What is the language of instruction at the host university?
  • Do you want to study away for a year or one term?
  • How many credits do you have to complete at the host university?
  • When do you expect to graduate? Will you graduate on time and within the degree time limit?
  • If your course selection is unavailable at the host university will you be "out of step" with your program requirements upon returning to McGill?
  • Will you have to extend your degree at McGill if you don't receive as many transfer credits as expected, or as many direct course equivalences as expected?
  • Are you are on a student visa; and if so, when does it expiry?

C. Funding your Study Away Program: Start thinking early about applying for funds to study abroad. There is a wide range of options available to you but you must be pro-active in your research and planning. For example, learn if you could tap into funds through federal or provincial-level government loans and bursary programs, foundations or private and public organizations. Inquire about the various application criteria and deadlines.

Note to American students regarding federal student aid: While on official exchange from McGill you are considered to be a full-time McGill student for U.S. Direct Loan purposes. Please be aware that regulations by the U.S. Department of Education states that you can receive U.S. Direct Loans only if attending a school that participates in the U.S. Direct Loan program, and the school is located outside of the U.S. For more information, please visit the Scholarships and Student Aid website.

D. Meet with your Program Adviser(s): You are strongly encouraged to make an appointment with each of your program advisers to discuss your plans to study away. Consult the list of Departmental Advisers for each program and/or department.

With your adviser(s):

  • Discuss your selected host university and the courses you may want to take.
  • Discuss your required and complementary courses, and any alternatives, which will count toward your departmental programs at McGill. Discuss elective courses and possible exemptions from specific McGill courses as a result of your study away program;
  • Determine the status of your McGill program requirements. In other words, which courses have you completed and which remain to be completed? Can they be completed at another university? Are you abiding to the "1/3 credit rule"?
  • NOTE: When choosing host university courses you must follow the criteria required to have the credits transfer toward your McGill degree; refer to TRANSFER CREDIT, B. COURSE CRITERIA

E. Review Faculty Policies: Since your participation in a Study Away program may be affected by certain faculty policies, use the following links to read and understand about Science or Arts courses and degree requirements:

General course requirements

General degree requirements:

Step 2: Where you can study

You can select any of the already approved universities from our listing of Host Universities.
Alternatively, you can choose to study at a different university and request that the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) consider it for approval. You must supply detailed information about the university with your application form as indicated on the Request Approval of a Host Institution. If the institution meets the faculty's criteria it will be approved as a suitable study away destination and added to our approved listing.

  • Only universities which confirm the following criteria to our office in writing may be approved:

a. you will be registered and attending an accredited, degree-granting university;

b. this SAME university will provide the official transcript of studies (third party "school of record" transcripts are not acceptable); and

c. the venue of studies is the principal campus of the accredited university or college, a language centre (which has been approved by the corresponding McGill University language department), or an academic program which is field-based.

Study Away requests involving study abroad (Intermediary) organizations are not approved. This includes, but is not limited to, the following organizations:

  • Abroadco Study Abroad, Academic Programs International (API), American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS), Arcadia University, Centers for Interamerican Studies (CEDEI), Council on International Educational Exchanges (CIEE), Cultural Experiences Abroad (CEA), Danish Institute for Study Abroad (DIS), Expanish, Greenpeace Organization, Institute for Study Abroad (ISA), Institute for the International Education of Students (IES), Institute of American Universities, Institute for Shipboard Education (ISE), International Partnership for Service Learning and Leadership (IPSL), International Studies Abroad (ISA), Living Routes, Mexico Solidarity Network (MSN), Road2Argentina, School of Field Studies (SFS), School of International Training (SIT), Woodenfish Project, World Bank Institute, Sotheby's Institute of Art, IAUSS (China).

Failure to have your host university/institution approved by SOUSA may result in NOT receiving transfer credits for courses taken elsewhere. Approval by a department or program adviser outside of SOUSA is a recommendation only and is NOT the final decision. Final decision is made by SOUSA.

Step 3: Requirements for a study away

You are permitted to study away for one semester or a full academic year at another university if you meet the following academic requirements:

  • are currently registered in a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts & Science degree at McGill University (with your program(s) of study accurately reflected on your Minerva transcript); and
  • have a CGPA of 2.70 or greater.

Step 4: McGill's application process

Apply online:

  • Log on to Minerva and navigate to: Student Menu > Student Records Menu > Exchange/Study Away Menu > NEW Request for Study Away. Follow the steps and refer to the provided information text and/or help keys.
  • Once you have been granted "Faculty Approval" status on your application, you can obtain an official "Letter of Permission" (LOP) by clicking on "Generate letter" link at the bottom of your Minerva Study Away application.

Course Equivalency System

All courses taken abroad must be approved using the Course Equivalency System.

Search the database to determine if the course you want to take has already been approved. You may want to use the “External” course number and then “Country” or “Institution” to determine if the course has already been approved. Make sure you also tick off “Include Expired Decisions”. The course may have already been approved, but might be expired, which means you will have to request a “Reassessment”.

If the course is not on the course database, then you must login (using your McGill email address and password) and “Submit a Request”. For further information on using the system, please go to Frequently asked questions

In addition to the required list of syllabus information, detailed on the Course Syllabus Checklist, you must also ensure that the syllabus contains the following information:
Institution's name
Course Number
Course description (content)
Date of course/syllabus (year/term).

Once you have made an independent study away application, you will then have access to the Minerva "Transfer Credit Assessment Form”. Only courses that appear on the Course Equivalency System can be added to the Transfer Credit Assessment Form. For further information, please refer to the Help Field on Minerva.

If you intend to use this course towards a program requirement you will need to email the departmental program adviser to get their approval on the Transfer Credit Assessment form once the course has been add to the form. Please consult with your program adviser.

You cannot assume that you will receive 3 credits for a course equivalency even if the course is 3 credits at McGill.

Online courses must be pre-approved by the Faculty of Science (even if the course has been approved on the course equivalency system). Send a detailed course syllabus to mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier). The Faculty of Science has the right to request a course syllabus (even if the course is approved on the course equivalency system).

The Faculty of Science has the final approval for all courses taken by a B.Sc. or B.A. & Sc. student outside of McGill.

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier) if you are a B.Sc. student, or tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (Tania Raggo) if you are a B.A. & Sc. student.

Submit your application according to the following period and deadlines:

For Fall term only
or Fall & Winter terms:
February 1st to August 15
For Winter term only: February 1st to December 1

C. Notification Procedure: If your request is approved, you will receive an email notification informing you that your Letter of Permission is available on Minerva.

Step 5: What about online courses? Can I use them towards my degree?

You are allowed a maximum of 6 online credits to be used towards the fulfillment of the elective requirements of your degree.

Before registering for an online course, however, you must seek prior approval of the Associate Dean, Student Affairs. Please submit your written request to mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier). In your email indicate your reasons for taking this online course and attach a detailed course syllabus which includes the method of evaluation as well as the information detailed in the Course Equivalency System section above.

If the Faculty of Science approves you to take the online course, it must then be evaluated using the course equivalency system. Once this has been done, the final approval from the Faculty will be given.

Step 6: Apply and enrol at host university

A. You apply directly to the host university as a visiting, special, independent, or non-degree student, according to their application process and deadlines. With your application, submit the Letter of Permission from McGill University.

B. Once offered admission, you enroll in course according to the registration dates made available to you.

Step 7: Before you leave

A. Get Course Approvals: using the Course Equivalency System.

B. Attend a Mandatory Pre-departure Information Session: Sessions are usually held once a term. For further information refer to: Pre-departure Info Session.

C. Register on the Mandatory Minerva International Travel Registry form. Once you have been coded as "Term Away" you will receive an email with instructions on how to complete the form.

Step 8: While at the host university

A. Keep all course materials: You may need to refer to exam questions, graded work, methods of evaluation, reading lists, for any transfer credit issues.

B. Regularly check your McGill email. SOUSA staff will email all correspondence, including important notices and information about registration, fees, graduation, etc., to your McGill email address only.

C. Official Transcript. Order an official final transcript from the host university to be sent directly to: Enrolment Services, Student Records, McGill University, 3415 McTavish Street, Room MS 13, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3A 0C8.

D. If you expect to return to McGill after your study away term, be sure to register for your McGill courses by appropriate deadlines to avoid any late registration fees.

Step 9: Cancelling your study away application

If you need to cancel your independent study away application, please fill out this form: Cancel your study away application.

4.4 Summer studies at a university outside Québec.

Important Announcement:

Summer 2021 study away has been cancelled.

McGill has made the difficult decision to cancel all in person or online study away for the Summer 2021 term. Therefore, students are not allowed to take in person or online courses in the summer term either internationally or in Canada (outside of Quebec). The Inter-University Transfer (IUT) program for courses at Quebec universities is still permitted.  Please check the McGill Coronavirus FAQ page for any updates.

Exemptions may be considered in cases where courses are time sensitive or critical for the student in order to graduate.  Failure to obtain an exemption for study abroad activities will result in not receiving transfer credits for courses taken in Summer 2021.

For questions or to request an exemption, please contact mcgillabroad [at] mcgill.ca, include your student ID number and cc the study away adviser in your Faculty.

If you would like to take a summer course at another Quebec University please see Study at another Quebec university (IUT).

Studying at another university during the summer months allows you the opportunity to take a few courses away from McGill while experiencing a new city or culture.

U3 STUDENTS:  If you are taking any courses outside of McGill during the Summer months and you are graduating, YOU WILL NOT be able to graduate at the end of the summer and must select the term of graduation (on Minerva) to the next Fall term (which is the next February graduation).

Note to American students regarding federal student aid: Students who taking distance education (online courses), research abroad, Official McGill Exchange or a Study Abroad program, please review the rules and regulations on the Scholarships and Student Aid website or go to the Scholarships and Student Aid office, Brown Building.

Requirements to study away at another university during the Summer:

Students in any year of studies, U0 to U3, are permitted to take summer courses at another university if you meet the following academic criteria:

  • You are currently registered in a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts & Science degree program at McGill and your program(s) of study are accurately reflected on your Minerva transcript.
  • You have a CGPA of 2.00 or greater.
  • You are permitted to take an overall maximum of 12 credits during the Summer session, including courses taken at McGill during the summer. 
  • All courses taken outside of McGill must be approved (using the Course Equivalency System) and all courses must be entered on the Minerva Transfer Credit Assessment form.

Where you can study:

Only universities which have confirmed, or will confirm, the following criteria to our office in writing are, or may be, approved:

Please review the website for Options for Studying Abroad.

A. You can select any of the already approved universities from our List of approved Host Universities

B. You can choose to study at a different university and request that the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) consider it for approval. You must supply detailed information about the university as indicated on the Request Approval Host Institution form. You must submit your request to mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthie)mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (r). If the institution meets the Science Faculty's criteria it may be approved as a suitable study away destination and may be added to the approved university listing.

C. You can learn French through the government-sponsored Explore Bursary Program. See specific information on this program below.

D. Another Option to consider is the summer program offered by McGill University

Important Information on applying for a study away: Summer 2021 study away requests are cancelled.

1. You MUST register and attend an accredited, degree-granting university;

2. This SAME university MUST provide the official transcript of studies (third party "school of record" transcripts are not acceptable); 

3. The venue of studies is the campus of the accredited university or college, a language centre (which has been approved by the corresponding McGill University language department), or an academic program which is field-based;

4. SOUSA WILL NOT approve study away requests involving any Study Abroad and/or Intermediary Organizations.

  • Abroadco Study Abroad, Academic Programs International (API), American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS), Arcadia University, Centers for Interamerican Studies (CEDEI), Council on International Educational Exchanges (CIEE), Cultural Experiences Abroad (CEA), Danish Institute for Study Abroad (DIS), Expanish, Greenpeace Organization, Institute for Study Abroad (ISA), Institute for the International Education of Students (IES), Institute of American Universities, Institute for Shipboard Education (ISE), International Partnership for Service Learning and Leadership (IPSL), International Studies Abroad (ISA), Living Routes, Mexico Solidarity Network (MSN), Road2Argentina, School of Field Studies (SFS), School of International Training (SIT), Woodenfish Project, World Bank Institute, Sotheby's Institute of Art, SIE International Summer School, IAUSS (China).

5. Unless otherwise indicated, universities are approved for "On campus studies" only.

Failure to have your host university/institution approved by SOUSA may result in NOT receiving transfer credits for courses taken elsewhere. Approval by a department or program adviser outside of SOUSA is a recommendation only and is NOT the final decision.

Explore Bursary Program:

You can learn French through the government-sponsored Explore Bursary Program.

  • You should consult the Explore Bursary Program website to determine the course you wish to take (see below for a list of institutions that are not acceptable for transfer credit).
  • You must submit a Minerva Summer Study Away application and you MUST indicate in the comment section that you wish to take a course through the "Explore Bursary Program" and the course must be pre-approved using the Course Equivalency System.
  • If you are accepted for the Explore Bursary Program you must confirm registration at the host institution, and then email: mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier) to indicate acceptance into the Explore Bursary Program.
  • Your Minerva Summer Study Away application will then be approved.
  • In early July, a notation of "Inter-University Explore Pgm" will be added to your Minerva transcript.
  • Upon completion of the program, you must request an official copy of the transcript be sent to the following address:

​McGill University
Enrolment Service, Student Records
3415 McTavish Street, Room MS 13
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
H3A 0C8

The following institutions are not acceptable for transfer credits:

CEGEP de Rivière-du-Loup
CEGEP de Trois-Rivières
Centre linguistique du Collège de Jonquière
Collège Boréal au Nipissing
Collège Saint-Charles
La Cité collégiale
University of Victoria (Division of Continuing Studies)
University of Saskatchewan

Study Away Application Process:

Important notice: Summer 2021 study away is cancelled.

Step 1:  Summer 2021 study away requests are cancelled, unless you have been given an exemption by the Faculty of Science.

Step 2: Have your course(s) approved using the Course Equivalency System

All courses taken outside of McGill must be approved using the Course Equivalency System. In order for your Summer Study Away application to be approved, all courses must also be entered on the Minerva Transfer Credit Assessment form.

  • Search the database to determine if the course has already been approved. You may want to use the “External” course number and then “Country” or “Institution” to determine if the course has already been approved. Make sure you also tick off “Include Expired Decisions”. The course may have already been approved, but might be expired, which means you will have to request a “Reassessment”.
  • If the course is not on the course database, then you must login (using your McGill email address and password) and “Submit a Request”. For further information on using the system, please go to Frequently asked questions. The name of the University must appear on the course syllabus, as well the year that the course syllabus was written must be indicated.

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier).

NOTE:  You will not be able to print a "Letter of Permission" without completing the steps listed above. 

Step 3: Apply and enrol at host university

  • Apply DIRECTLY to the host university as a visiting student (or their equivalent to a non-degree student status) according to their process and deadlines. 
  • Wait for "Faculty Approval" on BOTH your Minerva Study Away application and your Transfer Credit Assessment form.
  • With your application, submit the Letter of Permission and any other required documents. An official Letter of Permission can be printed from your Minerva Study Away application once "Faculty Approval" status has been granted. Click the "Generate letter" link on the form.
  • Once you are offered admission, register in courses according to the registration dates made available to you.

Before Studying Away:

A. Meet with your Program Adviser(s) and your SOUSA Adviser: If you are planning to take courses which you want to have count toward your program(s) requirements, you are required to meet with each of your program advisers. Consult the list of Departmental Advisers for each program and/or department.

  • Discuss your selected host university and the list of courses you plan to take.
  • Discuss your required and complementary courses, and any alternatives, which you want to count toward your departmental programs at McGill.
  • Discuss elective courses with your SOUSA adviser and possible exemptions from specific McGill courses as a result of your study away;
  • Determine the status of your McGill program requirements. In other words, which courses have you completed and which remain to be completed? Can they be completed at another university? Are you abiding to the "1/3rd credit rule"?
  • When choosing host university courses you must follow the criteria required to have the credits transfer toward your McGill degree; refer to TRANSFER CREDIT, A. COURSE CRITERIA

B. Review Faculty Policies: Since your participation in a Study Away program may be affected by certain faculty policies, use the following links to read and understand about Science or Arts courses and degree requirements:

General degree requirements:

NOTE: It is your responsibility to read and understand these policies and regulations. You cannot make any appeals resulting from a lack of knowledge or understanding of these policies.

At the host university

A. Keep all course materials; i.e., exam questions, graded work, methods of evaluation, reading lists, etc.

B. Official Transcript: Order an official final transcript from the host university to be sent directly to

McGill University
Enrolment Service
Student Records
3415 McTavish Street, Room MS 13
Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3A 0C8.

Transferring the credits - The Faculty is not transferring any credits for Summer 2021.

Once your studies at the host university are completed and you have arranged for an official transcript to be mailed to the Records Office (address above), the transfer credit process will begin. Please refer to TRANSFER CREDITS, C. Policies and Regulations, for details.

A. Transfer Credits: You must receive a passing grade of "C", or better, at the host university. Grades of C-, Pass (P) and Satisfactory (S) will not be accepted for transfer credits. Please refer to TRANSFER CREDITS, B. COURSE CRITERIA for the complete transfer credit policy.

B. You cannot assume that you will receive 3 credits for a course equivalency even if the course is 3 credits at McGill. The Faculty of Science has the final approval for all credits granted and courses taken by a B.Sc. or B.A. & Sc. student outside of McGill.

Cancelling your study away request?

A. McGill:

If you have been approved for summer courses at another university but end up NOT taking courses, you MUST cancel your request with the SOUSA Office, no later than August 1st. Please send an email to mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier)Failure to cancel your Summer Term Away will prevent you from making changes to your Minerva record for the Fall term.

B. Host university:

Make sure, that you have cancelled your registration at the host university; otherwise, you will be charged for the courses, and you will receive a failing grade at the end of the Summer term.

Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) Coordinates

All correspondence relating to STUDY AWAY:

McGill University
Faculty of Science (SOUSA)
Dawson Hall, Room 405
853 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC, H3A 0G5
CANADA

ATT: SOUSA STUDY AWAY/TRANSFER CREDIT COORDINATOR

Telephone number: 514-398-5442
FAX number: 514-398-8102
EMAIL: mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier)

 

4.5 Transfer credits

You are granted transfer credits for coursework satisfactorily completed at another University according to the regulations and procedures approved by the Faculty of Science as outlined below.

A. Which institutions are approved for transfer credits:

Transfer credits are accepted from institutions that meet the following criteria:

1. The host university is accredited by a college board, or a degree granting institution.

2. The host university offers a three or four year bachelor's degree or equivalent which is similar to a McGill Faculty of Science or Bachelor of Arts and Science degree.

3. Institutions such as Community Colleges, which offer associate two-year degrees, are acceptable for transfer credits if courses were completed PRE-McGILL ADMISSION. Once admitted to McGill, all courses MUST be taken at university-level institutions.

4. For a list of institutions already approved for transfer credit, please refer to: List of Approved Universities.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Failure to have your host university/institution pre-approved by SOUSA may result in NOT receiving transfer credits for courses taken elsewhere. Approval by a department or program adviser outside of Science should be considered as a recommendation only and not as the final decision. The final decision for approval is made only by SOUSA.

B. Which courses are acceptable/not acceptable for transfer credits:

Courses accepted for transfer credits must meet the following criteria:

1. Have academic content and be comparable in content and in method of evaluation to McGill courses that Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts and Science students are allowed to take for credit at McGill.

2. Must be applicable towards the fulfillment of the host university's own bachelor degree requirements.

3. COURSE OVERLAP:  courses must not overlap with courses already passed at McGill, CEGEP, another university or elsewhere. Please refer to eCalendar. It is your responsibility to verify your record.

4. COURSES OUTSIDE OF ARTS & SCIENCE: Courses offered by the host university's faculties and/or schools outside of Arts & Science are bound by the same credit limit as McGill courses: refer to: eCalendar 

5. Practicum ("How to") courses; e.g. dance, fashion design, journalism, photography, wine tasting, etc. are not permitted.

6. Distance Education courses (Online courses):  You are allowed a maximum of 6 online credits to be used towards the fulfillment of elective credit requirement of your degree. Before registering, you must seek prior approval by the Director of Advising Services. Please submit your written request to mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier). In your email indicate reasons for taking online course and provide a detailed course syllabus, which must include the method of evaluation.

7. Courses must receive final grades and be passed with a grade of "C", or better, at the host university. Grades of C-, Pass (P) and Satisfactory (S) will not be accepted for transfer credits. The letter grades achieved at the host university will take precedence over the corresponding numerical grades if both are provided. If the host university does not use a letter grade system, you must consult with the mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier) to confirm the minimum grade required for transfer credits. Please refer to the University eCalendar for more information on Transfer Credits.

8. Transfer Credit Load: For Fall or Winter term away, a maximum of 15 transfer credits is normally granted; for a full academic year away, a maximum of 30 transfer credits is normally granted; for a Summer session, a maximum of 12 transfer credits is normally granted. It is the host university's full course load for degree students that will determine the calculation of your transfer credits. Consult our List of Approved Host Universities. If you complete less than the equivalent of a full course load, transfer credits will be pro-rated.

9. Language and Civilization Courses:

  • Pre- and Post- Interviews or Placement Tests: You must consult the appropriate language department(s) before leaving for your study away to determine if a pre-interview or a pre-placement test is required. A pre-interview or pre-placement test is normally waived if you have previously taken a McGill course in the same language. Where appropriate, you must arrange to take a post-interview or post-placement test immediately upon returning to McGill. When you go to the post-interview or post-placement test, take detailed course information, including the method of evaluation, a copy of your host university transcript and an up-to-date copy of your Minerva academic record.
  • Courses taken at language centres are normally not permitted. However, if you obtain written approval from the appropriate Department Chair on the 'Transfer credit assessment form', this will be taken into consideration when assessing your record for transfer credits.
  • A language course which is not offered at McGill is normally assessed by our Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) Office as generic language transfer credits using course code 'TRNS LANG'. Send a detailed course syllabus to mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier).

9. It is your responsibility to abide by the rules and regulations of the host university to ensure the completion of the courses.

C. Course Equivalency System

All courses taken abroad (outside of McGill) must be approved using the Course Equivalency System.

Search the database to determine if the course you want to take has already been approved. You may want to use the “External” course number and then “Country” or “Institution” to determine if the course has already been approved. Make sure you also tick off “Include Expired Decisions”. The course may have already been approved, but might be expired, which means you will have to request a “Reassessment”.

If the course is not on the course database, then you must login (using your McGill email address and password) and “Submit a Request”. For further information on using the system, please go to Frequently asked questions

Once you have made an independent study away application, you will then have access to the Minerva Transfer Credit Assessment Form” (replaces the Course Approval Form). Only courses that appear on the Course Equivalency System can be added to the Transfer Credit Assessment Form. For further information, please refer to the Help Field on Minerva.

You cannot assume that you will receive 3 credits for a course equivalency even if the course is 3 credits at McGill.

Online courses must be approved (before being taken) by the Faculty of Science (even if the course has been approved on the course equivalency system). Send a detailed course syllabus to mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier). The Faculty of Science has the right to request a course syllabus (even if the course is approved on the course equivalency system). 

The Faculty of Science has the final approval for all courses taken by a Faculty of Science (or B.A. & Sc.) student taken outside of McGill.

D. How are Transfer Credits Processed:

Transfer credits are processed according to the following guidelines and regulations:

1. Course exemptions and transfer credits are indicated for the term(s) in which they were taken. Courses that do not have direct McGill course equivalencies are indicated using generic or specific subject codes: e.g. BIOL 3XX (for a Biology course at the 300 level), TRNS HUMN (for a course in a Humanities subject), or TRNS LANG (for a language course not taught at McGill). 

Courses given the following transfer credit codes can be used only as electives for your McGill Science or B.A. & Sc. degree: SUBJ 1XX; e.g. BIOL 1XX (for a course considered as "general" Biology course), TRNS GNST (General Studies), TRNS HUMN (Humanities), TRNS LANG (Language), TRNS MASC (Math and Sciences) or TRNS SOSC (Social Sciences).

The number of credits transferred will reflect the number of credits completed at the host university, and may differ slightly from the credit weight for the equivalent McGill course, where such an equivalent course exists. Students are advised to verify their record and meet with their departmental adviser once the transfer credits are added to the Minerva transcript.

1. The host university's full course load for degree students will determine the calculation of McGill transfer credits. If the host university has a different full course load for International students, the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) Office will use this requirement to calculate the number of transfer credits you will receive.

2. The host university's full-year course load is equivalent to 30 McGill credits; their term (Fall or Winter) course load is 15 McGill credits. Consult our list of approved host universities (to be available shortly) to determine what is considered a "full course load".

3. If less than the equivalent of a full course load is completed, credits will be calculated as follows:

  • The number of credits taken at the host university, divided by the number of credits for a full-year course load at the host university, multiplied by 30.
  • Here's an example: 10 units completed at University A ÷ 14 units for a full-year course load at University A x 30: [10/14 x 30 = 21.4] = 21 McGill transfer credits.

4. In Europe, most universities use the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) to assign credit weight to courses. Credit ratio is 2 ECTS credits =1 McGill credit; so 60 ECTS credits = 30 McGill credits; 30 ECTS credits = 15 McGill credits.

5. All transfer credits will be displayed on the Minerva transcript regardless of whether the courses have been successfully completed or have been approved towards your McGill degree.

6. The grades achieved at the host university will not appear on the McGill transcript and will not be included in the McGill CGPA; however, you are expected to maintain your McGill academic standing at the host institution. If the host university grade average is not comparable to the final McGill CGPA, the designations of Distinction or Dean's Honour List may be withdrawn at graduation.

7. If your current academic standing is Unsatisfactory or Probationary, credits will only be transferred to your record once you return to Satisfactory standing.

8. Departmental academic advisers in Arts, Science and in other faculties at McGill will evaluate courses (based on content, level and method of evaluation) for approval and make recommendations for transfer credit assessment. However, SOUSA has sole responsibility for the final decision made for granting transfer credits and for the number of transfer credits given. We will do our best to ensure you receive a fair assessment, but we cannot guarantee that the courses you choose will receive full credit.

E. SOUSA Office and Coordinates

Official Transcript should be sent to: 

Enrolment Services, Student Records
McGill University
3415 McTavish Street, Room MS13
Montreal, Quebec CANADA H3A 0C8

All correspondence relating to TRANSFER CREDITS, must be addressed to:

Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) Office
Faculty of Science, Dawson Hall, Room 405
853 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC, H3A 0G5, CANADA
TELEPHONE NUMBER: 514-398-5442
FAX NUMBER: 514-398-8102
EMAIL: mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca


5. Degree transfers

The Faculty of Science welcomes transfer applications to the Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor of Arts & Science degrees. If you are already a McGill student pursuing an undergraduate (Bachelor) degree and would like to change to a different degree, there are two ways to do it:

  • An inter-faculty transfer refers to changing from one degree to another (e.g. from a B.A. to the B.A. & Sc.). Please refer to the student account website for further information on the possible change of tuition fees and other services.
  • An intra-faculty transfer refers to B.Sc. students who want to switch from one program group within the B.Sc. degree to another (e.g. switching from the Biological, Biomedical and Life Sciences (BBL) Group to the Physical, Earth, Math and Computer Science (PEMC) Group).

If you are studying at another university and want to transfer to McGill, you must apply through the Admissions website as a Transfer student.

5.1 Limits on eligibility to apply for a degree transfer

Students entering U3 with 84 or more credits* are no longer eligible to apply to transfer into the Faculty of Science or into the B.A. & Sc. degree. 

*Students admitted to McGill from a CEGEP DEC and transfer students from another university – your credit limit is 84 credits as indicated by the TOTAL CREDITS value on your Minerva transcript.

*Students admitted to McGill from International Baccalaureate or the French Baccalaureate, or who were granted advanced standing due to Advanced Placement examinations, GCE A-Levels, and other qualifications – your credit limit is 84 + the number of advanced standing credits indicated on your Minerva transcript. (In other words, 84 credits post-admission.)

Students entering U3 with less than 84 credits: You must have completed a minimum of 24 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with an average GPA of 3.0 in these credits with no grade below "C".

5.2 Transfer requirements and instructions

The Minerva application to transfer into the Faculty of Science or into the B.A. & Sc. degree for the Fall semester will be available on Minerva as of March 1st. The application deadline on Minerva will be May 15th. At the time of your application you must have already met the minimum requirements to transfer.

If you are returning to your studies after an interruption of one term or more, and you wish to apply for both readmission and an inter/intra faculty transfer into the Bachelor of Science degree or the Bachelor of Arts and Science degree, you must fill in the electronic readmission application, indicate in the appropriate area that you also wish to transfer, and summarize your activities during your absence in the comments section of the form. The deadline to apply for readmission and an inter/intra faculty transfer is May 15th for Fall term.

If you are registered in the School of Continuing Studies and have never been registered in a degree program, or are a special student, or have already completed an undergraduate degree, you must apply at the Admissions Office.

5.2.1 Supporting documents

Students wishing to transfer to the B.Sc. or the B.A. & Sc. degree are not required to submit documents, except in the following circumstances:

Students who have interrupted their studies, and during their absence completed courses at another university, must submit a photocopy of their transcript with the application and then arrange to have an official copy sent to the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) Office.

Official documents that must be submitted are as follows:

  • official advanced standing results (AP's, AL's, IB's) if applicable
  • official transcripts from any other university attended, including Summer session courses
  • a letter of appeal, if applicable

No decision will be made until all documents have been received. To be accepted as official, transcripts must be sent directly from the University you attended, to the SOUSA Office.

The electronic application are automatically delivered. All supporting documentation should be sent to:

Faculty of Science (SOUSA)
Inter/Intra Faculty Transfer Adviser
McGill University
Dawson Hall, Room 405
853 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G5
Tel.: 514-398-5442
Fax: 514-398-8102
 

5.2.2 Minimum requirements for transfer to the B.Sc.

When you apply for an inter- or intra-faculty transfer to the Faculty of Science, you will be asked to nominate one of the following program groups and a major/subject within that group:

  • Biological, Biomedical and Life Sciences Group
  • Bio-Physical-Computational Sciences Group
  • Neuroscience Group
  • Physical, Earth, Math and Computer Science Group

It is important to apply for the group that interests you most because, if you are admitted, your choice of a major or honours program will be limited to the options available in that group. If you later decide you wish to pursue a program in a different program group, you will need to apply for an intra-faculty transfer, subject to academic performance, availability and other conditions.

For full details of the programs available in each program group, refer to:

› Bachelor of Science program groups

For inter- and intra-faculty transfer applicants, the following admission requirements apply to each program group:

Biological, Biomedical and Life Sciences Group

Applicants must have completed:

  • Two (2) of the following Math courses: MATH 139/140/150, MATH 141/151 or MATH 133/134
  • BIOL 112
  • One of PHYS 101/131 or PSYC 100
  • CHEM 120

The Math courses require a minimum grade of B or better:
BIOL, CHEM, PHYS or PSYC courses require a minimum grade of B
The minimum CGPA is 3.00

  • Students entering U2: A minimum of 9 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with a minimum grade of B in each course.
  • Students entering U3 with 84 or more credits* are no longer eligible to apply to transfer into the B.Sc. See further information above (under New Policy).
  • Students entering U3 with less than 84 credits: You must have completed a minimum of 24 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with an average GPA of 3.0 in these credits with no grade below "C".

NOTE: The minimum requirement does not guarantee acceptance into the Biological, Biomedical and Life Science Group, as this is dependent on space available in the group. Space in this group is very limited. 

Here is a breakdown of applications and acceptances in past years for the Biological, Biomedical and Life Science Group:

Application year Number of Applications Number of Accepted applications Lowest CGPA Accepted
2010 180 30 3.70
2011 200 75 3.50
2012 150 50 3.45
2013 135 40 3.45
2014 150 40 3.43
2015 125 49

3.08

2016 100 45 3.32
2017 90 45

3.02

2018 105 47

3.20

2019 108 40 3.06

Bio-Physical-Computational Sciences Group

Applicants must have completed:

  • Two (2) of the following Math courses: MATH 139/140/150, MATH 141/151 or MATH 133/134
  • BIOL 112
  • One of PHYS 101/131 or PSYC 100
  • CHEM 120

The Math courses require a minimum grade of B or better:
BIOL, CHEM, PHYS or PSYC courses require a minimum grade of B
The minimum CGPA is 3.00

  • Students entering U2: A minimum of 9 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with a minimum grade of B in each course.
  • Students entering U3 with 84 or more credits* are no longer eligible to apply to transfer into the B.Sc. See further information above (under New Policy).
  • Students entering U3 with less than 84 credits: You must have completed a minimum of 24 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with an average GPA of 3.0 in these credits with no grade below "C".

NOTE: The minimum requirement does not guarantee acceptance into the Bio-Physical-Computational Science Group, as this is dependent on space available in the group. Space in this group is very limited. 

Neuroscience Group

A separate application (paper) as well as the Minerva transfer application will also be required. Please go to the Neuroscience website for further information.

Applicants must have completed:

  • Two (2) of the following Math courses: MATH 139/140/150, MATH 141/151 or MATH 133/134
  • BIOL 112
  • One of PHYS 101/131 or PSYC 100
  • CHEM 120

The Math courses require a minimum grade of B or better:
BIOL, CHEM, PHYS or PSYC courses require a minimum grade of B
The minimum CGPA is 3.00

  • Students entering U2: A minimum of 9 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with a minimum grade of B in each course.
  • Students entering U3 with 84 or more credits* are no longer eligible to apply to transfer into the B.Sc. See further information above (under New Policy).
  • Students entering U3 with less than 84 credits: You must have completed a minimum of 24 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with an average GPA of 3.0 in these credits with no grade below "C".

NOTE: The minimum requirement does not guarantee acceptance, as this is dependent on space available in the group.

Physical, Earth, Math and Computer Science Group

Applicants must have completed:

  • Two; (2) of the following Math courses: MATH 139/140/150, MATH 141/151 or MATH 133/134
  • One of PHYS 101/131 or COMP 202
  • Two of PHYS 102/142, CHEM 110, CHEM 120, BIOL 111, BIOL 112, ESYS 104 or a third MATH from the list above

The Math courses require a minimum grade of B or better:
PHYS, CHEM, COMP, BIOL and ESYS courses require a minimum grade of B
Minimum CGPA of 3.00

  • Students entering U2: A minimum of 9 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with a minimum grade of B in each course.
  • Students entering U3 with 84 or more credits* are no longer eligible to apply to transfer into the B.Sc. See further information above (under New Policy).
  • Students entering U3 with less than 84 credits: You must have completed a minimum of 24 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with an average GPA of 3.0 in these credits with no grade below "C".

NOTE: The minimum requirements do not guarantee acceptance, as this is dependent on space available in the group.

5.2.3 Minimum requirements for transfer to the B.A. & Sc. 

Applicants are normally expected to have a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.00 for transfer to the B.A. & Sc. degree.

Applicants who originally came to McGill from outside Quebec must have completed:

  • Two (2) of the following Math courses (with grades of B or better):
    MATH 139/140/150, MATH 141/151 or MATH 133/134

and any three of (with grades of B or better):

  • BIOL 111 or BIOL 112
  • PHYS 101/131 or PHYS 102/142 
  • CHEM 110 or CHEM 120
  • At most two of: COMP 202, ESYS 104 or PSYC 100

The minimum CGPA is 3.00.

Applicants from Quebec should have completed these courses either at CEGEP or at McGill with grades of B or better.

  • Students entering U2: A minimum of 9 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with a minimum grade of B in each course.
  • Students entering U3 with 84 or more credits* are no longer eligible to apply to transfer into the B.A. & Sc. See further information above (under New Policy).
  • Students entering U3 with less than 84 credits: You must have completed a minimum of 24 credits which can be applied to the proposed program, with an average GPA of 3.0 in these credits with no grade below "C".

NOTE: Meeting the minimum criteria does not ensure acceptance into the B.A. & Sc. Enrolment is limited to space available in the program.

Any inter-faculty transfer applicant who does not meet the minimum transfer criteria must submit a letter of appeal (which should not be longer than one page) with the electronic application. Enter the appeal in the comments area of the electronic application outlining the following:

  • any reasons which may have contributed to your performance
  • steps you have taken or plan to take to improve your academic performance

If applicable, send any supporting documents separately to the SOUSA Office.

5.3 Appeals

Any inter- or intra-faculty transfer applicant who does not meet the minimum transfer criteria must submit a letter of appeal (which should not be longer than one page) with the electronic application. Enter the appeal in the comments area of the electronic application outlining the following:

  • any reasons which may have contributed to your performance
  • steps you have taken or plan to take to improve your academic performance

If applicable, send any supporting documents separately to the SOUSA Office.

5.4 Next steps

What happens to my credits and average if I transfer?

Applicants accepted for transfer into the B.Sc. will receive credits for all courses completed in the Faculty of Arts as well as up to 18 credits of approved courses outside Arts and Science (some exceptions may occur; each applicant is assessed individually). The CGPA will continue in the new Faculty reflecting all grades including D, F's and J's. If admission conditions differ from the above this will be explained in the acceptance email on the Minerva inter/intra faculty transfer application.

Applicants accepted for transfer into the B.A. & Sc. will normally receive credit for all Arts and Science courses completed in the previous faculty and up to 30 credits in certain designated programs that include a number of Required and Complementary courses in other faculties and/or a maximum of 12 credits outside the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science. The calculation of the CGPA will continue in the new Faculty reflecting all grades including D, F's and J's. If admission conditions differ from the above this will be explained in the acceptance email.

When and how will I be notified of the decision?

Decisions on applications are made only after receipt of all documents. Normally, if we have all the required documents, you will be notified sometime in June or July to your McGill email account to view the response in your Minerva electronic application.

What do I do after I have been accepted?

You must accept or decline the transfer electronically: select "offer accepted" in the online Minerva application form. We will not adjust your record to reflect the transfer unless you have formally accepted the conditions of your transfer. If you accept, make appropriate advising appointments with your new program adviser and with your Faculty Adviser (which will be indicated on your Minerva transcript).

What can I do if I have been refused?

If your application to transfer has been refused, read your refusal email or letter carefully. If you have any questions, please contact:

  • mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier) if your application was to transfer into the B.Sc.
  • Tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (Tania Raggo) if your application was to transfer into the B.A. & Sc.

5.5 Advice

For further advice on inter- or intra-faculty transfers, see one of the advisers by below.

  • mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier) for transfers into the B.Sc.
  • tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (Tania Raggo) for transfers into the B.A. & Sc.

6. Readmission

COVID UPDATE: Please note that at this time staff are working from home.  Mailed or faxed documents cannot be accessed.  Should you need to provide documentation please contact readmission.science [at] mcgill.ca for instructions on how to provide any documents.

It is your responsibility to check your readmission application and/or emails as we may require further information. If this information is not provided by the specified deadline your application may be cancelled.

All students in Quebec must have a valid Permanent Code. This should appear on your Minerva transcript, near your name. If it is missing, see the legal documents website for information on how to obtain a Permanent Code.

If you are readmitted, your rate of tuition may be different from when you last were enrolled at McGill. For more information, be sure to visit Student Accounts. You should also verify your Minerva Advising transcript to see if you have any holds outstanding which will prevent you from being able to register for courses if you are readmitted. Please note that readmission decisions are made independently of financial information. If outstanding fees or fines are owed to the University, registration will not be permitted, even if readmission has been granted.

If you are an international student readmitted to McGill, you must possess a valid Study Permit and CAQ, including a valid Permanent Code, for the duration of your remaining studies at McGill. If you are readmitted and your documents have already expired, you must first register for courses and then apply for and obtain renewed immigration documents before the start of classes. For more information, visit Legal documents, and for assistance please contact International Student Services. Consult the Minerva “View your Tuition and Legal Status” page to see if your record at McGill reflects your most recent immigration status in Canada.

Read the information in Section A, which applies to all students seeking readmission to the Faculty of Science, and then read the detailed information pertaining to your specific situation which can be found in points 1, 2 or 3.

IMPORTANT:  If you need to provide medical documentation please be aware that OFFICAL documents are required and must be mailed, faxed or scanned directly from your health practitioner or their office. A medical note hand-delivered by you in an unsealed envelope, a scanned note sent by you or a fax that has not been sent directly by the health practitioner is NOT an official note and may not be accepted. 

Section A

  • Students who are seeking readmission must complete an application using the electronic readmission module on Minerva, accessible through the Student Records menu.
  • The electronic application and appeal (student comments) are automatically delivered. All supporting documentation, PDF’s, scans, or Word documents, must be sent to: Mrs. Jane Hawes, Assistant to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs (SOUSA), Faculty of Science at: readmission.science [at] mcgill.ca
  • For inquiries, please send emails to: readmission.science [at] mcgill.ca

Readmission Deadline:
Term

Module Opens Module Closes
Summer Term: March 1st June 1st
Fall Term: March 1st July 1st
Winter Term: October 1st November 15th

 

Readmission and Transfer Deadline:
Term

Module Opens Module Closes

Fall Term
(See No. 2 below)

March 1st May 15th
  • In the student comments section, provide the following information:

✓ Telephone number and email address only if your McGill email is no longer active. McGill email address will be used for all active students.

✓ State the reason(s) for your absence from the University and give a summary of your activities during this period.

✓ If you withdrew because of illness you should provide a medical note stating that you are ready to resume your studies. The note must confirm that your health enables you to continue your studies and it should include a recommendation for the number of courses you should take.

✓If you studied elsewhere during your absence from McGill, you must email a PDF copy of your entire unofficial transcript, including all pages, from all schools that you have attended to readmission.science [at] mcgill.ca, include your name and McGill student ID number in the subject line.  At some point during the readmission process you will need to request that the institution(s) send an official transcript to McGill.  You will be informed when the official transcript is needed.

✓ You should be aware of time limits for the completion of degrees.

✓ An incomplete application will delay the processing of your request and may result in being Faculty Cancelled.

✓ IMPORTANT:  If it is your intention to apply for readmission in order to apply for a Study Away YOU MUST include this information in the Student Comments section.

✓ Don’t wait! Apply Early!

Read the section that applies to your specific situation:

1. Readmission to the same degree after an absence for students in satisfactory or probationary standing.

  • Read information listed in Section A.

2. Non-Science students who are seeking readmission and transfer to Science and Science students who are seeking readmission and transfer to another admissions group or degree within Science.

  • Read information listed in Section A, as well as the following:
  • The Faculty of Science does not accept inter-faculty transfers into Science or intra-faculty transfers within the Science admission groups for the Winter term. See: Degree transfers.

    • Should you be applying for readmission and transfer for Winter, due to a technical error, you may be able to choose a transfer group (BSc to BA&Sc, Neuroscience to PEMC, etc.) on the Minerva application. Please be aware that if you do so your application will not be processed as submitted. You will be sent an email requiring further information.

    • If you wish to return to the Faculty of Science but wish to change your degree, you have two options:  (A) Submit a readmission and transfer application for the Fall term, or (B) Return to your present degree in preparation for making a transfer application for the Fall. You should speak with your SOUSA adviser to discuss your options.

  • Deadlines for readmission and transfer applications are DIFFERENT. You must apply by the transfer deadline date which is earlier than the readmission deadline date.
  • If you are in unsatisfactory standing, see #3 for additional required information.
  • In the student comments section, you must specify the admissions group or degree that you are applying to.

3. Readmission for students in unsatisfactory standing

  • Read information listed in Section A, as well as the following:
  • If your most recent standing was unsatisfactory as indicated on your unofficial transcript, viewable through Minerva, readmission is granted only when proof of extenuating circumstances that affected your academic performance can be provided (e.g. medical or other documentation).
  • Describe the extenuating circumstances which affected your academic performance. Provide supporting documents (e.g. doctor's letter, employer's letter) where appropriate.
  • Explain how the problems you experienced would be under control or no longer applicable if readmitted. In the case of poor performance due to medical problems, you must provide medical documentation. The note must confirm that your health enables you to continue your studies and it should include a recommendation for the number of courses you should take.
  • Before you submit your request for readmission, please consult the material on self-assessment as this will help you describe your situation and improve your performance if readmitted.

7. Special, visiting and exchange students

7.1 Getting started at McGill

Inform yourself:

Read all the information in this section of the handbook for special, visiting and exchange students. You should also read the sections on Choosing courses and Course registration.

Select courses and register until the last day of the add/drop period)

Select your courses for Fall and/or winter term using the eCalendar and the class schedule on Minerva. Don't forget to select the the Fall and/or Winter term on Minerva.

Faculty Advising

Mary Gauthier, your Faculty adviser from the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising Office (SOUSA) will be available to answer any academic questions you have about your time at McGill.During the first two weeks of the Fall and Winter terms, you have the opportunity to change the courses for which you have registered. You may drop and add courses as you wish, subject to any restrictions indicated in the eCalendar and Timetable. After the course change period, you may withdraw from courses until approximately the mid-point of each term. Head to mcgill.ca/importantdates for exact deadlines.

If you are undecided about whether to drop or withdraw from a course, you can talk to an adviser in your department as well as an adviser in the SOUSA Office. You should assess your progress to date in the course, and try to reach a realistic evaluation of your ability to complete each course successfully.

Discuss course changes with your departmental adviser(s) who will approve them if appropriate. Use Minerva to make the changes to your record. You can also go and see Mary Gauthier (Faculty Adviser), Dawson Hall, Room 405.

Ongoing advice and support: until end of term

If you have questions about your course selection, consult with your adviser in the department that administers the courses.

For Exchange students: Your Faculty adviser (Mary Gauthier) will be your resource person. She will send you emails at intervals during the academic year. Make sure you read them carefully as they will contain important information.

If you have questions, your Faculty adviser (Mary Gauthier) will be having Same-Day advising sessions throughout the academic year. For more serious issues you can arrange an individual appointment with her. Come to the SOUSA Office, 4th Floor, Room 405 of Dawson Hall or call (514) 398-1368 and arrange for an advising appointment. If you have a simple question, you can email your adviser (mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca). When emailing your adviser, please include your name and student number in the subject line. Also, please make sure to use your McGill email account as per McGill's email policy: email communication with students [.pdf]

7.2 Advising appointments

In order to determine which courses will be appropriate for you, your departmental adviser will need to have information about the courses you've taken at your home university. Please bring the following pieces of information to your advising appointment:

  • a copy of your academic record (courses and grades) from your home university;
  • course descriptions for the courses you have taken at your home university;
  • information about the number of credits or courses required to complete your degree;
  • a list of suggested McGill courses that you think might be appropriate for you to take;
  • a list of questions you want to ask the adviser.

The departmental adviser will review the courses you have already completed to ensure that you have the appropriate background for the McGill courses you intend to take.

For advice of a more general nature, you should consult, as necessary, with your Faculty adviser (which will be indicated on your Minerva transcript) in the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising Office (SOUSA) on the 4th floor, Room 405 of Dawson Hall. The SOUSA Office is also very knowledgeable. You can come in person, or phone (514) 398-5442.

› Contact SOUSA
› SOUSA office hours

7.3 Selecting courses as a special, visiting or exchange student

Each course has a credit weight associated with it. The normal load for a full-time student in Science is five courses or 15 credits per term. The number of credits you take in a term should be determined by your own situation. If you have commitments outside the University, you might consider reducing your load to 12 credits per term (this is normally the minimum for those studying on a student visa).

Course selection should be done with your departmental academic adviser. The courses you take should also be chosen with your personal situation in mind. If this is the first time you are studying in English, you might want to mix program courses, electives and English as a Second Language courses. If you have studied in English before, but feel that your writing should be improved, you should investigate the courses in English for Academic Purposes.

Departmental restrictions (Anatomy & Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Biology, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Physiology)

Students must contact Mary Gauthier, mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca, for information on how to register for courses that have a departmental restriction. Departments reserve the right to limit access to courses for which students do not hold equivalent prerequisite courses.

Research courses

Some Faculty of Science research courses are open to special, visiting and exchange students. Please contact your departmental adviser before registering for a research course.

7.4 What to do if you experience difficulties

Occasionally students experience serious problems which affect their ability to complete coursework on time. If there are medical problems, or other personal problems which prevent you from giving sufficient time to your courses or exams, there may be arrangements which we can make.

If the situation interferes with the submission of term papers, writing of midterm tests, or other class work, consult with the course instructor. It may be possible to arrange for make-up tests, or extensions of deadlines. The instructor will require supporting documentation in the form of a doctor's letter, or other relevant documents.

On the other hand, if you are unable to write formal final exams, or feel that withdrawal from courses or the University after the normal deadline may be necessary because of illness or family affliction, you should consult with your adviser in the SOUSA Office. If special arrangements are to be made, supporting documentation will be required.

› Contact SOUSA

 


 

8. Academic advice

8.1 Making academic decisions

1. What is the difference between an uninformed and an informed decision?

Uninformed decisions are often made when:
It doesn't seem all that important which choice you make.
The problem is not that complex and the decision doesn't have large consequences.

  • You can make uninformed decisions intuitively, impulsively or randomly.
  • None of these methods of decision-making is necessarily inappropriate.
  • For example, you might decide intuitively to wear your raincoat because you have a feeling that it might rain.
  • You might decide impulsively to go to a concert at the very last minute.
  • You might pick your choice of movie randomly by flipping a coin.
  • If your decision involves more complexity and has larger consequences, you should make an informed decision.

Informed decisions:

  1. Lead to focused, planned action.
  2. Are the result of gathering information, identifying alternatives, visiting your values and designing strategies.
  3. Choosing your departmental program of study, or where you want to live, are both examples of consequence-holding decisions that can benefit from informed decision-making.

2. How can you make an informed decision? A decision-making method

1. What is the problem?
Identify and name the problem.

2. What are the possible solutions?
List all possible solutions.

3. What do you need to know in order to choose a solution?
Gather information that will help you decide what to do.

4. What would happen if you chose a particular solution?
Identify the outcome of each solution by listing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

5. How do you decide which solution to choose?
Prioritize the advantages and disadvantages in order of their importance to you- check your values.

6. Choosing a best solution.
Choose the solution that has the greatest number of most important advantages and the least number of disadvantages.

7. What if there is no 'best' solution?
Choose the 'next best' solution, one that is not ideal but which you can accept and live with.

8. Putting your solution into gear.
Make an action plan.

9. Act.
Carry out your action plan.

10. Monitor.
Observe and evaluate the results of your actions.

11. Apply what you have learned for next time.
Keep actions which generated positive results; eliminate those that didn't.

3. Applying the method to an academic problem - an example

Let's try this method out on an academic problem.

Scenario: Susan is enrolled in five courses for the fall semester. She is struggling with one of her 3-credit required courses and is worried that she might fail it. The withdrawal deadline with refund has already passed, but the withdrawal deadline with no refund is still one week away. She is unsure if she should withdraw from the course or not. Her finances are tight and she doesn't want to have to pay to repeat the course if she does withdraw. On the other hand, she is concerned about the effect of a low grade on her average. She is also extremely stressed and is having trouble sleeping and eating as a result of this stress.

1. What is the problem?
Identifying and naming the problem.

Problem 1:
Susan is struggling academically with the course.

Problem 2:
She has financial problems.

Problem 3:
She is experiencing stress.

2. What are the possible solutions?
Listing all possible solutions.
To withdraw from the course. To remain in the course.

3. What does Susan need to know about each of these solutions in order to pick one over the other?
Gathering information that will help her decide what to do.

Some questions she should answer:

  • Is her stress caused by this problem, or by something else?
  • When is the withdrawal with no refund deadline?
  • What would the withdrawal look like on her record?
  • Would the withdrawal affect her average?
  • What are the implications of having a withdrawal on her record?
  • Must she make up the 3 credits in the next semester, or can she do it later?
  • What minimum grade does she need in the course?
  • If she stays in the course and gets an "F", to what extent will this affect her average?
  • Can she obtain extra help to try and improve her performance in the course?
  • What are possible sources of extra help?
  • If the extra help isn't free, can she afford to pay for it?
  • How important is completing this course this term to her?
  • What effect will not completing it, or failing it, have on her winter course choice?
  • Is it a prerequisite for any of her winter term courses?
  • Are there additional questions she should answer?

4. What would the result be of choosing to withdraw? To remain in?
Identifying the outcome of each solution by listing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Susan now lists the advantages and disadvantages of each solution.

Solution 1 - Withdrawing:

Advantages Disadvantages
Would no longer be stressed about failing Would complete 3 fewer credits this term
Would have more study time for other courses Would lose the tuition for these 3 credits
Grade will not affect average Would have to repeat course if required
  Would have a "W" on her record

Solution 2 - Remaining in:

Advantages Disadvantages
If passes, earns 3 credits Anxiety about failing will remain
If earns a grade of "C" will not have to repeat it Resultant stress may affect ability to cope with courses in general
  Efforts to pass may affect other grades
  If does poorly, low grade will lower average
  If passes with "D" will still have to repeat it
  May cost money for extra help

5. How to decide which decision to choose?
Prioritizing the advantages and disadvantages in order of their importance to her- checking her values.

Susan feels that doing well in the course is more important to her than having to pay to make up the credits, despite her tight financial situation.

She feels that it is also important to reduce her stress level, which she thinks has worsened as a result of worrying about her performance in this course. She also wants to do well in her other courses, and does not want this course to affect her other grades.

Susan has labelled each advantage and disadvantage according to its level of importance to her as follows:

MI= Most Important

I= Important

SI = Somewhat Important

NI = Not Important

Withdrawing:

Advantages Disadvantages
Would no longer be stressed about failing MI Would complete 3 fewer credits this term I
Would have more study time for other courses MI Would lose the tuition for these 3 credits I
Grade will not affect average I Would have to repeat course I
  Would have a W on her record NI

Staying in:

Advantages Disadvantages
If passes, earns 3 credits SI Anxiety about failing will remain MI
If earns a "C", will not have to repeat it SI Resultant stress may affect ability to cope with courses in general MI
  Efforts to pass may affect other grades MI
  If does poorly, low grade will lower average I
  If passes with "D" but course is required, will still have to repeat it I
  May cost money for extra help I

6. Choosing the best solution:
Choosing the solution that has the greatest number of most important advantages and the least number of disadvantages.

Susan feels that there are 2 best solutions, neither of which is possible. One is to have withdrawn from the course during the withdrawal with refund period. The other is to complete the course with a strong grade.

7. What if there is no best solution:
Choosing the 'next best' solution, one that is not ideal but which she can accept and live with.

Susan chooses Solution 1 - Withdrawing.
It contains the greatest number of advantages she has labelled as MI or I, and contains only those disadvantages which she can accept.

The advantages include:

  • no longer being stressed about failing the course
  • having more time to study for her other courses.

The disadvantages include:

  • finishing less credits this term than she had planned
  • losing her tuition
  • having to repeat the course

She feels this is the next best solution. She will lose her tuition if she withdraws, but she doesn't believe it is possible for her to complete the course with a strong grade. However, despite losing her tuition and having to repeat the course, she feels that this decision is acceptable to her, because the advantages outweigh the disadvantages.

8. Putting her solution into gear:
Making an Action Plan.

Susan makes an Action Plan:

  • Access Minerva and withdraws.
  • Inform her instructor that she has withdrawn.
  • Make an alternative study plan for the remainder of the semester; allot extra study time to her other courses as necessary.
  • Look at her winter course choice and adjust it accordingly; consider delaying courses that have this course as a prerequisite.
  • Talk to instructors and departmental advisers about winter course choice.
  • Plan when she will repeat the course.
  • Monitor her stress level as the term progresses; notice whether or not the withdrawal has reduced it; if not, explore other reasons for her stress level; consider talking to a counsellor about her stress level.

9. Acting:
Carrying out her action plan.

Susan completes each step of the above Action Plan.

  • Accesses Minerva and withdraws.
  • Informs her instructor that she has withdrawn.
  • Makes an alternative study plan for the remainder of the semester; allots extra study time to her other courses as necessary.
  • Looks at her winter course choice and adjusts it accordingly; considers delaying courses that have this course as a prerequisite.
  • Talks to instructors and departmental advisers about winter course choice.
  • Plans when to repeat the course.
  • Monitors her stress level as the term progresses; notices whether or not the withdrawal has reduced it; if not, explores other reasons for her stress level; considers talking to a counsellor about her stress level.

10. Monitoring:
Observing and evaluating the results of her actions.

Susan assesses whether or not withdrawing had a positive effect on:

Her stress level:

  • Is she able to eat and sleep?
  • Is she able to concentrate when studying?

Her fall grades:

  • Did her other grades improve?
  • If so, does she think they did so as a result of withdrawing?
  • Or was it for some other reason?

11. Applying what she's learned for next time:
Keeping actions which generated positive results; eliminating those that didn't.

  • Susan draws conclusions about her decision by analyzing the results.
  • She applies what she has learned to her next academic problem.
  • She uses strategies which worked and changes or eliminates what did not.

4. Making Your Decision: Your Decision-Making Worksheet

Use this worksheet to analyze the problem and make a decision.

1. What is the problem?
Identify and name the problem.

Write a sentence that names and describes the problem.

2. What are the possible solutions?
List all possible solutions.

List all the solutions you can think of. Don't evaluate- just list!

3. What do you need to know in order to make an informed decision?
Gather information that will help you decide what to do.

List all your questions and where to find the answers. Then, answer the questions.

Question 1:

Sources for answer:

Answer:

Question 2:

Sources for answer:

Answer:

Question 3:

Sources for answer:

Answer:

4. What would happen if you chose a particular solution?
Identify the outcome of each solution by listing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

List all the advantages and disadvantages you can think of for each solution:

Solution 1:

 
Advantages Disadvantages
   
   
   
   
   
   

Solution 2:

 
Advantages Disadvantages
   
   
   
   
   
   

Solution 3:

 
Advantages Disadvantages
   
   
   
   
   
   

5. How do you decide which decision to choose?
Prioritize the advantages and disadvantages in order of their importance to you- check your values.

For each solution, label each advantage and disadvantage on your table as follows:

MI Most Important

I Important

SI Somewhat Important

NI Not Important

6. Choosing the best solution:
Choose the solution that has the greatest number of most important advantages and the least number of disadvantages.

Examine your list of solutions, advantages and disadvantages.
Choose the solution that contains the greatest number of advantages that you have labeled as MI or I.
If the solution you are choosing contains disadvantages, are they ones which are acceptable to you?

Write your solution here:

Solution:

 

7. What if there is no best solution?
Choose the 'next best' solution, one that is not ideal but which you can accept and live with.
Choose a solution that contains at least some advantages that are important to you, and a minimum number of disadvantages that you can accept.

Write your next-to-best solution here:

Next-to-Best Solution:

 

8. Putting your solution into gear:
Make an action plan.
What will you do to put your solution into action?
What will your action plan consist of?

ACTION PLAN:

Action Date to be completed Date actually completed
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

9. Acting:
Carry out your action plan.
On the Action Plan, write the date you actually completed each action.

10. Monitoring:
Observe and evaluate the results of your actions.
As you carry out your action plan, evaluate the results of your actions. Make a list of questions you want to answer as a result of having made this decision. Write down the answers as you discover them.

Question 1:

Answer:

Question 2:

Answer:

Question 3:

Answer:

11. Applying what you've learned for next time:
Keep actions which generated positive results; eliminate those that didn't.

Make a list of things you would do similarly the next time you are trying to make a decision. Explain why you'd do these things again. What was useful or workable about these actions?

Write your list here:

Why would you do these things again?

What actions would you change or eliminate? Why?

When you are working on your next problem, review this list. Use it as a starting point for your next decision-making process.

5. On-campus resources

8.2 Self-assessment

Self assessment is the key to academic success. External factors are often the root of academic problems, but they are not always a direct cause of poor grades. Rather, it is often the decisions you make in dealing with your problems that have a direct effect on your grades. You have a great deal of control over your academic success.

For example, you may describe your academic performance this way: "Being ill with mono all term, I was forced to miss classes. I decided to keep all of my courses because I didn't want to fall behind, and I wrote all of my finals even though I was tired all of the time. Having mono is why I got poor grades."

This differs from: "I was ill with mono all term and I knew I couldn't carry a full load. I should have withdrawn from some of my classes, but I didn't want to fall behind. I made a mistake believing I could write all of my finals when I was still sick. My decision to keep a full course load when I was tired all of the time resulted in poor grades."

To assess your own academic performance, look at the categories below and pinpoint which category applies to your situation. In fact, you may find that more than one category applies, and a combination of factors reflects your situation. When you read the questions, take note of any that you can answer with a "yes". This list is not comprehensive, so your own list may include factors not described here.

External factors

  • Did you have financial problems?
  • Did you have too many extra- curricular activities?
  • Did you do too much socializing?
  • Did you have a job outside school?

Personal factors

  • Were you not ready for school (unmotivated)?
  • Were you here only for your parents?
  • Were you unhappy with your program or faculty?
  • Did you feel you didn't "belong" at school?
  • Were you bored?
  • Did you experience test anxiety?
  • Were you unable to handle stress?
  • Did you have language difficulties?
  • Did you suffer from isolation or loneliness?
  • Were you ill?
  • Did you experience personal problems?
  • Were you unable to evaluate the effect of your problems on your school work?
  • Did you fail to take the initiative in seeking help for your problems?

Academic factors

  • Was your course load too heavy?
  • Were you unaware of university policies, procedures & resources?
  • Did you not study enough?
  • Did you fail to go to lectures, conferences or tutorials?
  • Did you lack a proper environment for studying?
  • Were you unable or unwilling to identify weaknesses in your study skills?
  • Did you lack organizational skills?

Think about the items you have listed. Then, in a few sentences, describe how the choices you made or the actions you took (or did not take) affected your academic performance. Be honest with yourself: were the factors that affected you beyond your control, or could you have done things differently? The answer to this question is key to how you propose to improve your academic performance in future terms.

After having evaluated the factors that affected you, and examining your choices and your actions, make a list of concrete steps you plan to take to overcome your academic difficulties. Your plan might include some of the following suggestions:

  • Reduce your course load, the hours you spend at your job or at extracurricular activities.
  • Learn time management techniques.
  • Learn to be more proactive when assessing your progress in school (e.g., talk to professors, T.A.s, other students; don't be afraid to ask questions).
  • Learn how to evaluate courses in order to make appropriate, timely academic decisions (e.g., before the withdrawal deadline, ask yourself key questions like "do I understand the material", and "am I keeping up with the work").
  • Familiarize yourself with university rules and deadlines (it may be boring, but it's important).
  • Participate in study skills workshops, hire a tutor, form study groups with other students, or find useful self-help and study skills information at the library or on the Web.
  • Take advantage of resources available on campus to help you when you have health or personal problems, or to advise you on academic matters.
  • Learn to recognize your limits and what is realistic for you to accomplish given your particular circumstances, talents and skills.

If, after working through this exercise, you still have unanswered questions, please consult your program adviser or an adviser in the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) Office for academic questions, or consult the staff in Student Services in the Brown Student Services Building for questions concerning medical, personal or financial problems.

8.3 Study skills

I. How to study

Successful study demands that you give yourself ample time and that during this time you keep your mind actively engaged in the learning process. Ample time for the average student means about two hours of study for each hour of class. Since the normal academic load is 15 to 16 credits, the average student will spend that many hours in class plus twice that many hours studying, totaling about 45 to 48 hours a week.

Keeping your mind actively on the job is the more difficult task. Two methods have been found helpful in this respect:

A. S-Q-3R method. In this formula:

S stands for Survey

Q stands for Question

3R stands for Read, Recite, Review

 

In applying this method to a given assignment, you first leaf through it to get the general drift of the discussion, noting introductory remarks, topics, paragraph headings and summaries. On the basis of this survey you ask yourself questions which you hope to have answered as a result of reading the assignment. Then you read it, carefully and intently. Having read it, you come to what is perhaps the most important feature of this method, namely self-recitation. That is, you ask yourself questions on the assignment, such as the instructor might ask in class or in an examination, testing yourself on the answers. Finally, you review to see how complete and correct your answers were. It has been found experimentally that at least half of one's study time can be profitably devoted to self-recitation, versus a simple reading and re-reading of the assignment.

B. Outlining method

This can be done by using your own markings, symbols and underlinings directly in your textbook or it can be done by jotting the main points down in organized fashion in your notebook. While the latter procedure takes more time, it has the advantage of encouraging you to put the author's ideas into your own words. For many students the actual writing out of the materials is itself an effective learning device. In either case, however, the value of the outlining method will depend on how sharp you are in selecting and organizing the essential ideas. A written outline can be too wordy and underlining can be too extensive. The ideal is just enough to capture the main points with sufficient detail to make them meaningful. Where underlining is used it should be done only after the complete assignment has been read at least once.

The outline form used in this paper is generally acceptable. Roman numerals (I, II, etc.) and/or capital letters (A, B, etc.) indicate the main headings; Arabic numerals (1, 2, etc.) and then small letters (a, b, etc.) indicate the sub-headings. Use this form also in taking lecture notes.

The S-Q-3R and Outlining methods can of course be used in combination. Self-recitation is especially helpful after having outlined the assignment.

C. Other suggestions for effective study

  1. Make out a time schedule and hold yourself to it.
  2. To the fullest extent possible, make study a habit by studying at the same time and place each day.
  3. Schedule definite review periods, say every Friday or Saturday, during which the lecture and textbook materials covered during the week are reviewed.
  4. Avoid distractions while studying. Do not take phone calls or other interruptions which disturb your concentration.
  5. Provide for at least one hour of recreation every day. Try to keep noon hours, late afternoon hours, and regular time Saturdays and Sundays for relaxation and exercise.
  6. Get plenty of sleep and keep your outside workload within reasonable limits. A student carrying a full academic load should as a rule not have more than 15 hours of outside employment per week. Your course load should be reduced by one credit for every 3 hours of employment beyond 15 hours.

The following web site is a helpful reference: Study Guides and Strategies

II. How to take lecture notes

  1. Read the textbook assignment before going to class in order to be familiar with the ideas and terminology presented.
  2. Do not try to reproduce the lecture verbatim. Listen for ideas and be selective in what you put down. Use the outline form already designated under section I-B.
  3. Do not crowd your notes. Allow plenty of space between points to keep them distinct from each other and for additions. A large-size notebook (8 1/2 x 11) is preferable to a smaller one.
  4. Keep all of your notes for the current period in one loose-leaf notebook, with index tabs to identify the individual courses.
  5. Review your notes as soon as possible after class; fill in and edit obscure points.

III. How to improve your reading

The average college student should be able to read 250 to 300 words of non-technical material per minute. If your reading speed is less than this, you are handicapped in one of your most needed skills. Check yourself on this point.

The solution to reading problems is sometimes complex and needs the attention of an expert in the field. Most people, however, can do much on their own to improve reading speed and comprehension by observing the following points:

  1. Remove all visual defects. Have you had your eyes checked?
  2. Force yourself (1) to read faster, and (2) to cover more words per eye fixation. Not more than 2 or 3 fixations per sentence should be necessary and once you are really good at it, you may be able to comprehend an entire sentence or even paragraph at a glance. Reading speed is to a large extent a matter of habit. By exerting conscious effort in the direction of reading faster for a period of time you can change this habit, without loss in comprehension. This matter of consciously trying to read faster is one of the most important points in the improvement of reading.
  3. Your reading comprehension will be no better than your vocabulary. Build your vocabulary by keeping a running list of words you do not know. Look them up after each assignment and write down their definitions. Review this list from time to time. Usually, this method is preferable to interrupting your reading to consult the dictionary for each unfamiliar word.

IV. How to prepare for and take an examination

A. Control your attitude

  1. Look upon the test as a competitive game, as an opportunity to show your mettle. Develop the attitude of the sportsman -- win if you can, lose if you must, but do the best you can.
  2. Be reasonable in your expectations of yourself. The instructor does not expect a perfect paper; neither should you. Simply represent yourself as adequately as you can.
  3. Keep in mind that there are other tests to follow. You are not betting all your money on one horse.
  4. Remember that you have prepared for the examination and that this preparation is bound to show. (If you have not prepared, the "pre-examination jitters" may be justified. They are not if you have prepared.)
  5. Get a good night's sleep before the examination. A clear head, coupled with adequate preparation, is your greatest asset.

B. Know your stuff

  1. Begin the day after a test to prepare for the next test by keeping up with the day-to-day assignments. Set aside one hour each week for review of each subject.
  2. Begin your intensified review of the subject a week before any major examination.
  3. Review by making a list of the important definitions, laws, principles, theories, formulae, experiments, persons, ideas and concepts, as these apply to your particular course or courses.
  4. If you have not already done so, make an outline of the material covered and, in your own mind, relate the more detailed items to it.
  5. Cramming as a concentrated, intensified review of materials previously learned is good; as a last-minute effort to learn for the first time, it makes for confusion and is bad.
  6. Try to figure out what questions you would ask in the examination if you were the instructor and then get the correct answers.
  7. Know whether the exam will be of the objective or essay type and then review accordingly. The objective exam stresses the more factual, detailed knowledge. The essay type stresses the organization, relationship and application of the subject matter.
  8. Keep your old examinations or quizzes and analyze them for your weaknesses. If you can't tell why you did poorly on an exam, see your instructor. Don't hesitate to ask him to clarify specific points that you think might be important. However, don't go to your instructor's office simply with the statement, "I can't get this stuff." Pinpoint your questions.

C. Take the test, don't let it take you

  1. Before beginning to write, spend a few moments planning the whole exam. Read the directions and, in the case of an essay exam, the questions twice, underlining significant words.
  2. Answer the easiest questions first, but apportion your time carefully. Very complete answers on a few questions will not usually compensate for very inadequate answers on others.
  3. Think more and write less. Instructors are more impressed by the to-the-pointness of your answers than by how much space you fill. Leave space after each answer for afterthoughts or for further elaboration as time permits.
  4. In objective tests be careful of items containing the words: only, always, never, etc. In essay tests, notice such words as: name, define, outline, list, explain, illustrate, and compare. These tell you what the instructor wants.

Re-read your paper before handing it in.

8.4 Failing a course

If you fail a course, you may wish to consult an adviser in the Student Affairs Office in Dawson Hall to discuss your options. Depending on the type of course (required or elective course), the grade ("D", a conditional pass, or "F"), your performance in your other courses, and the circumstances for the failure, there are three alternatives:

  1. Repeat the course;
  2. Substitute another course for the one you took;
  3. Apply to write a supplemental examination.

If you fail a required course, you should consult an adviser about modifying your course choice. You should expect that taking Calculus II when you have failed Calculus I, for example, will only result in another failure.

Regardless of whether a course is a required, complementary or an elective course, a grade of "D" is a conditional pass and will only earn you credit as an elective course. Program requirements or prerequisite courses including basic science courses in the Science freshman program, or the core courses in the Arts freshman program, must be passed with a "C" or better. Before proceeding to the next level, you must repeat required or prerequisite courses in which you received a grade of less than "C", or you may choose to take a supplemental examination. You can generally replace complementary courses with other optional courses. If you fail an elective course, you replace it with a different elective course

If you repeat a course for which you have already earned a grade of "D", you will receive credits for the course only once.

You should apply for a supplemental examination only under the following conditions: your GPA is 2.50 or better; you have reduced your course load for the winter-term, or do not have a heavy summer schedule; you know the material well and will have little trouble studying for the supplemental on your own.


9. Choosing courses

9.1 Credit load

The normal course load is 4-5 courses (12-15 credits) per term; a full year is normally 30 credits. If you are not sure how many credits to register for each term or for the academic year, keep the following regulations in mind:

  • 12 credits per term to maintain full-time status, eligibility for student visas, loans and bursaries;
  • up to 14 credits (4 courses) maximum per term for students in probationary standing;
  • up to 17 credits per term for students in satisfactory standing;
  • 27 graded (non-S/U) credits per academic year (both the fall and winter terms) to be considered for renewal of entrance scholarships or for in-course McGill scholarships or awards, including Dean's Honour List; at least 27 graded credits that fulfill the degree requirements to be considered for faculty scholarships; 30 graded credits per year to maintain Canada scholarships;
  • maximum allowed credits is up to 17 credits per term for students whose standing is Satisfactory or Interim Satisfactory.
  • students whose CGPA is 3.5 or higher and who wish to take a course overload of up to a maximum of 19 credits are required to fill out an online request form at: www.mcgill.ca/student-records/exceedcredits and are strongly urged to consult their adviser. Allow several working days for the processing of your request.

9.2 English and French second language courses

English Second Language (ESL) courses are open to students whose primary language is not English and who have studied for five years or less in English-language secondary institutions.

B.A. & Sc. and B.Sc. students are allowed a maximum of 12 credits of ESL courses, including academic writing courses for non-anglophones.

Placement tests are required for all courses offered through the English and French Language Centre. Soon after the tests are evaluated, you will be issued a departmental approval for course registration.

Click here for detailed information about placement tests.

9.3 Language courses

As a freshman student, you may wish to take a language course this year. The following regulations regarding language courses apply to students in the freshman year.

  1. No more than one 6-credit or 9-credit language course at an elementary level may be taken in the first year.
  2. You are permitted to take two language courses in the freshman year provided that they are at different levels, e.g., Elementary French and Intermediate German. YOU MAY NOT TAKE TWO INTRODUCTORY-LEVEL LANGUAGE COURSES.
  3. A 6-credit language course given in one term is permitted -- this is equivalent to two courses both in the number of credits as well as the workload.
  4. The 12-credit intensive language courses are designed to accelerate three-year students and are normally not suitable for freshman students.

Placement tests: All language courses have limited enrolment and, as such, may require a departmental approval (issued by the department offering the course). Consult the McGill Calendar and/or the class schedule for information about placement tests or departmental approval (if necessary). Please note that placement tests for French as a second language will be held during the week prior to the beginning of classes in September. Please click here for dates and times.

East Asian language courses

Language courses offered by the East Asian Studies Department are worth 9 credits, the equivalent of 1.5 courses per term. If you intend to take a beginners course in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean, you are advised to register for 4 courses in the first term. If you find things are going well with the course during the fall term, you can always pick up a fifth course in the winter term.

English as a second language

If you have never studied in English before, you are strongly advised to take English as a Second Language courses in your first year. You may be able to converse easily but still find it quite difficult to read and write in English. If you are a non-anglophone student and have studied in English for four years or less, you are permitted to take English as a Second Language courses.

English for academic purposes and effective communication courses

If you would like to improve your English writing skills, you may wish to take the English for Academic Purposes course, Fundamentals of Academic Writing (CEAP 250),

Note: B.Sc. students may take a maximum of 12 credits in English as a Second Language courses, including English for Academic Purposes courses.

French courses

You are permitted to take French courses in the French as a Second Language Department with the following stipulations:

  1. FRSL 101 - Beginners French: This course is open only to students having no previous knowledge of French. This means that you have never successfully completed a French course in high school.
  2. FRSL 207 - Elementary French: This course is not open to students who have completed Grade 12 or OAC French in Canada.
  3. FRSL 211 - Oral and Written French I: Normally, this course is not open to students who completed their secondary education in Quebec. This is the minimum level at which students with Grade 12 or OAC French in Canada should place. If you have an Advanced Placement (AP) in French (minimum grade of 4 for transfer credit and exemption), you may not take FRSL 211 for credit. If you place at this level and have an AP in French Language or Literature, see your SOUSA adviser in Dawson Hall.

French bursary programs: If, prior to coming to McGill, you completed a French bursary program through a university, you may be eligible for transfer credits. Upon your arrival at McGill, you must arrange to take a placement test and see an adviser in SOUSA in Dawson Hall. Transfer credits will not be given for French bursary programs completed through a CEGEP or college.

Spanish courses

  1. All Spanish language courses are conducted entirely in Spanish. This includes all introductory-level courses after the first week of class.
  2. If you have an Advanced Placement (AP) in Spanish, you are not permitted to take HISP 210 for credit.

a) HISP 210 - Spanish Language, Elementary

If you have little or no formal training in Spanish, you will place at this level.

b) HISP 220 - Spanish Language, Intermediate

Normally, you will place at this level if you have completed one of the following:

  • two years of CEGEP Spanish
  • 4-5 years of high school Spanish in the United States
  • "A" Level in Spanish
  • first-year Spanish at McGill or at another university in Canada or the United States

9.4 600-level courses

Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts and Science undergraduate students will be permitted to take 600-level courses subject to the following conditions:

  • The student has a minimum CGPA of 3.3.
  • The student is in U3.
  • The professor of the course and the program adviser or the director of the undergraduate program provide written approval supporting the request.
  • A maximum of six credits of 600-level courses are allowed towards the degree.
  • The actual course number appears on the transcript.
  • The course evaluation methods and grading standards are the same for all students, whether graduate or undergraduate.
  • The regulations and practices of the Faculty Science are also applied to such a course.

9.4.1 Procedures to be followed by the student:

  • It is the responsibility of the student to start the procedures well in advance of the term and to undertake the various steps along the way to final approval so that they can be completed before the end of the Drop/Add period.
  • Read the policy and Procedures sections.
  • Complete the required fields on the PDF form AND save as: Your name, ID#, course number: request to take 600-xxx course.
  • The usual approvals (from professor and department) are still required.
  • Send an email to the Professor of the course with the following information in the subject line: Your name, ID#, course number: request to take 600-xxx course.  Attach your completed form.  Ask them, if they approve your request, to respond to your email with a cc to Joan.kaylor [at] mcgill.ca or tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (B.A. & Sc. students) with "Approved" in the body of the email.
  • Send an email to the Adviser or Undergraduate Program Director of the course with the following information in the subject line: Your name, ID#, course number: request to take 600-xxx course.  Attach your completed form.  Ask them, if they approve your request to respond to your email with a cc to joan.kaylor [at] mcgill.ca or tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (B.A. & Sc. students) with "Approved" in the body of the email.
  • Once you have received approval from BOTH the Professor of the course and Adviser or Undergraduate Program Director, send an email with your completed form as an attachment to joan.kaylor [at] mcgill.ca or tania.raggo [at] mcgill.ca (B.A. & Sc. students).  The subject line MUST include: your name, ID#, course number, Semester (ex: Fall 2020, Winter 2021).
  • If the conditions and procedures are met, the request will be reviewed.  You will be contacted by email once a decision has been made.
  • It is the student's responsibility to register for the course on MINERVA before the end of the course Add/Drop period.
  • Open the fillable form PDF icon 600-Level Form using Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader.
  • You will be contacted by email once a decision has been made.
     

DO NOT LEAVE REQUESTS UNTIL THE LAST DAY.

9.4.2 Exceptional cases (CGPA below 3.3, late requests, *Visiting/Exchange Students):

Students in this category must also submit a letter detailing the reasons why approval should be granted even though the conditions have not been met. Such requests may be refused. The procedures for such requests are the same as those stated above.

*Visiting and Exchange students must attach a student copy of their transcript from their home university.


10. Course and program registration

10.1 Online registration system

Minerva Help Desk
514-398-7878
If you have problems registering on Minerva, call the Minerva Help Desk or contact Service Point.

Students register through the online system, Minerva. Head to mcgill.ca/students/courses for a comprehensive guide on the registration process, including building a class schedule, registering for courses and waitlisting.

10.2 Registering for programs

Science students who have departmental approval to register for an Honours program should go into the program registration menu on Minerva and select Honours Degree Program first, and then select the appropriate honours discipline(s) from the drop down menu. All other students will select Degree Program before selecting the appropriate major discipline(s) from the drop down menu.

10.2.1 Limited enrolment programs

The following programs are not available for selection on Minerva. Students who wish to register for one of these programs should visit Service Point with the adviser's or faculty's written authorization to have the program added to their record (check the eCalendar for a complete listing):

  • Minor in Management for non-Management students
  • Minor in Marketing for non-Management students
  • Minor in Operations Management for non-Management students
  • Minor in Finance for non-Management students
  • Minor Entrepreneurship for Science Students
  • Minor in Electrical Engineering for Physics students
  • Minor in Minor in Musical Applications of Technology
  • Minor in Musical Science and Technology
  • Minor in Kinesiology

10.3 Registering for courses

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR ALL STUDENTS

Minerva does not necessarily prevent students from registering for courses that they should not take. Therefore, it is your responsibility to be aware of prerequisites, corequisites, restrictions, and faculty regulations that apply to the courses in which you register.

B.Sc. students note: There are some courses outside of the faculties of Arts and Science that you cannot take for credit. See our list of approved/not approved courses.

10.3.1 Fall/Winter term registration

Please refer to Important Dates and the eCalendar for registration details. All students should familiarize themselves with the eCalendar. Students are responsible for knowing the course change and withdrawal deadlines for each term. Please note that late registration fees may apply if you wait to register for your courses.

Special registration periods apply for freshman science courses. For details, refer to the section in this handbook on Registering for freshman courses.

10.3.2 Summer session registration

Please refer to the Summer Studies Calendar and Important Dates for details.

10.4 Registering for Freshman courses (for students from outside the B.Sc. and B.A. & Sc. degrees)

Since Freshman Science students begin registration later than students from several other faculties, it is our policy to restrict access to certain Freshman science courses for part of the summer.  Restricted courses will only open to other students once B.Sc. and B.A. & Sc. students (as well as students from other select programs) have had a chance to register. This is to ensure that students who need these courses for their degree have appropriate access.

Note: the dates below only indicate when these specific courses will become available for registration. They do not change the opening dates of registration for new students.

Below you will find the registration policy for 2021:

For non-lab freshman courses
MATH 133, MATH 134, MATH 139, MATH 140, MATH 141:

June 1 to June 22

Open to students in selected degrees:

  • BSc
  • BA&Sc
  • BEd
  • BSc (Kinesiology)
  • BSc (Nursing)
  • BEng
  • BSE (Software Engineering)
  • BSc (Architecture)
  • BA (Arts);

Closed to all other students

June 23 by 10:00 a.m. Open to all students

For freshman courses with labs
BIOL 111, BIOL 112, CHEM 110, CHEM 120, PHYS 101, PHYS 102, PHYS 131, PHYS 142:

June 1 to July 7

Open to students in selected degrees:

  • BSc
  • BA&Sc
  • BEd
  • BSc (Kinesiology)
  • BSc (Nursing)
  • BEng
  • BSE (Software Engineering)
  • BSc (Architecture);

Closed to all other students

July 8 by 10:00 a.m. Open to all students

10.5 Courses offered by faculties other than Arts and Science

Please refer to the course requirements information in the eCalendar (B.Sc. section and B.A. & Sc. section) and in this handbook (B.Sc. section and B.A. & Sc. section) regarding the number of courses offered by other faculties that you are allowed to take towards your degree requirements. Please note, not all courses offered by other faculties are approved for credit towards your degree requirements, even if you successfully register for them on Minerva. Once course change period is over, such courses will be flagged on your record so that they will not contribute to your credit count or your CGPA.

10.5.1 Desautels Faculty of Management courses

Students registered in programs requiring Management courses (Minor in Management, Minor in Finance, Minor in Marketing, Minor in Operations Management, etc.) may register early in specific courses according to the eCalendar and Important Dates. As all Management courses are limited by enrolment, students in the above programs are strongly encouraged to take advantage of these early registration dates. Please note that, although registration in Management courses opens to all students at a later date (check date here), other course controls may continue to block registration (e.g. prerequisite controls, enrolment caps, faculty restrictions, etc.). You may have to consult with SOUSA and with the Faculty of Management to obtain permission to register.

10.5.2 School of Continuing Studies courses

Please note that courses with section numbers of 751, 761, etc. (as opposed to 001, 002, etc.) are courses offered by the School of Continuing Studies. Early registration in Continuing Studies courses is restricted to students in Continuing Studies programs. Science students can register for Continuing Studies courses at a later date (check date here).

10.6 Tips on handling registration problems

If you have problems registering for specific courses, be sure to write out the error message before contacting the appropriate office for help. In most instances (e.g. program controls, prerequisites controls, enrolment limits met, etc.) you will need to deal directly with the department offering the course to determine if registration is possible.

There are a variety of controls that can be placed on courses that may cause "registration errors" (i.e. registration failures) when you are registering on Minerva. Below are some of the registration errors that you may encounter with an explanation and suggestions for problem-solving. Please read this over carefully; if you are still unable to resolve your registration problems, you should contact Service Point .

There is a list of contact people for Science course enrolment issues, but read the material below first, before contacting them.

Note: Always pay attention to "NOTES" that may appear directly below courses in Class Schedule as they may help explain error messages that occur.

Closed Course

This will be apparent by the "C" that appears at the far left of the course number in Class Schedule where normally a tick box appears. (If ALL the courses appear closed, verify that you are in the correct term, and not a previous year!) This means that all of the places in the course are taken at that moment in time. There are two solutions to this registration error, depending on whether a) you need the course to fulfill program requirements or (b) you want the course as an elective.

(a) If you need the course to fulfill program requirements you must contact the department administering the course directly (e.g., Biology for a BIOL course, English for an ENGL course, etc.). Explain your situation to the staff person and they will determine if you are eligible for a place in the course. If the department allows you into the course they will grant you a "permit to register", an electronic indicator that is put directly onto your record that lets the student record system recognize you as eligible to register. You must still use Minerva to register after the permit is granted.

Note: If you are granted a CAPACITY permit because a course is closed, you MUST use the "quick add" feature on Minerva.

(b) If you want the course as an elective, you should not contact the department, as they must give priority to students who need the course to meet program requirements. However, it is possible during add/drop that there will be movement within the course, and if you try regularly to "quick add" the course you may be able to register because another student drops the course. If the course uses the Waitlist feature, at the time you try to "quick add" and the course is still full, you will be invited to join the waitlist. If you add yourself to the Waitlist you will be notified by your McGill email if a place becomes available and you are next on the list to register.

Note: Have another course in reserve in the event you are not successful adding your first choice. You may have to plan to take this elective in another term.

Reserve Closed Course

This happens when a specific portion (a reserved section) of the course is full. For example, a department may give 50 places for students in specific programs, and 30 places for everyone else. If you are not in one of the specific programs and the 30 places are taken, you will receive this error message. The reverse is also true: if you are in a specific program and the 50 program places are taken, you will receive this error message. The solution to this registration problem is the same as for Closed courses: see a) above if you need the course for a program requirement, and see b) above if you want the course as an elective.

Class Restriction

This refers to courses that are limited to students in a specific academic year (U0, U1, U2 or U3). Courses with class restrictions usually have "NOTES" in Class Schedule of "Limited to U0 (or U1, U2 or U3) students".

If you are not in the correct year to permit registration, you must see the department administering the course to determine if you are eligible for a place in the class (e.g. Chemistry for a CHEM course, International Development Studies for an INTD course, etc.). If the department allows you into the course they will grant you a "permit to register", an electronic indicator that is put directly onto your record that lets the student record system recognize you as eligible to register. You must still use Minerva to register after the permit is granted.

Program Restriction

This refers to a course that is controlled by program codes; if you are not in an appropriate program you will not be able to register.

Courses with program controls usually have "NOTES" in Class Schedule of "Limited by Program". There are two possible solutions to this restriction: (a) if the course is program controlled within the faculty you are accepted into, or (b) if the course is program controlled in a faculty you are not accepted into.

(a) An example of a program control within your faculty would be an BIOL course which is open only to Biology students. If you have been accepted into a B.Sc. degree (or the BA&SC), and you want to fulfill a Major in Biology, then you must have the program properly entered onto your record to register.

Note: You may not add programs to your record that you do not intend to follow solely for the purpose of registering in a restricted course; if you are found to have obtained a place in a limited course in this manner you will be deregistered.

(b) An example of a program control in a faculty you are not accepted into would be a Management course which is only open to students in programs in that faculty. If you plan to apply for the Minor in Management for non-Management students, you will not be able to register for any course with "NOTES" of "Limited by Program" or "For Management students only". You must select courses from those sections and terms that do not have these notes, or from those courses offered by the School of Continuing Studies (sections of 751, 761, etc. instead of sections 001, 002, etc.).

Note: If you opt for a section offered through Continuing Studies you will have to wait until August 15 to access fall courses and December 15 to access winter courses; the periods prior to these dates are for priority access for Continuing Studies students.

Faculty Restriction

This refers to a course that is controlled by faculty codes, i.e. only students in specific faculties may register. If you are a B.Sc. student seeking to register in an Engineering course or an Education course you may experience this error message. Please contact the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) Office to explain why you want to register in this course and to obtain further advice on how to proceed.

Departmental Approval Required

This refers to courses which require a placement test or the approval of the professor or other relevant administrator prior to registration. Courses with this type of control usually have "NOTES" in Class Schedule of "Departmental approval required" or "Adviser approval required" or "Placement test required". For example, language courses may require you to be "placed" at the appropriate level before you can register, or other courses may require you to see the professor or an administrator prior to registration. Once the department establishes your language level or your suitability to join the class, they will grant you a "permit to register", an electronic indicator that is put directly onto your record that lets the student record system recognize you as eligible to register. You must still use Minerva to register after the permit is granted.

Link Error

This refers to courses (lecture activities) which have other activities "linked" to them that require you to add more than one CRN at a time. Courses with this type of control usually have "NOTES" in Class Schedule of "Must be taken with a tutorial" or "Must be taken with a lab". For example, if you are registering in a CHEM or BIOL course which have lab activities "linked" to them, a MATH course which has a tutorial "linked" to it, or to a SOCI or ANTH course with conferences "linked" to them, you must choose both the lecture activity and the linked activity and add them at the same time.

Prerequisite Required

This refers to courses which have prerequisites and/or corequisites that must be satisfied before you can register. There will not always be "NOTES" in Class Schedule to warn you of existing pre- and co-requisites, so if this error message occurs it will be necessary to verify in the undergraduate calendar what courses are needed prior to registration. The solution to this problem varies depending on (a) whether the prerequisites are clearly on your record with valid grades, or (b) if the prerequisites are part of transfer credit or other types of advanced standing (i.e. not McGill courses but equivalent work done elsewhere for which you've been granted credit).

(a) An example of a clear-cut case would be a MATH course that has a prerequisite of an introductory statistics course, and you have this course or its equivalent on your record with a grade of "C" or better. Please contact the SOUSA Office; we will evaluate your record and the MATH course description, and if appropriate, grant you a "permit to register", an electronic indicator that is put directly onto your record that lets the student record system recognize you as eligible to register. You must still use Minerva to register after the permit is granted.

(b) An example of a complicated case would be a MATH course that has a prerequisite of an introductory statistics course and you have covered the material of this course at another university and have been granted transfer credit from that university. You must take a description of that course and the grade you earned directly to the Math department to have the content evaluated for its suitability to act as a prerequisite. If the department establishes that you have satisfied the prerequisite, they will grant you a "permit to register", an electronic indicator that is put directly onto your record that lets the student record system recognize you as eligible to register. You must still use Minerva to register after the permit is granted.

Note: Prerequisite controls normally exist on courses in other faculties (Engineering, Management, Music) so it may be necessary to have that faculty verify that you have suitable prerequisite(s). However, that faculty will not grant you a permit; you must bring written permission (e.g. a Minerva worksheet) from that faculty to the SOUSA Office for processing.

Maximum Hours Exceeded

This refers to the total number of credits in a term that the student record system will allow students to register in. New students are expected to register for a normal load of 15 credits but may register for up to 17 at any given time to allow for later adding and dropping as the student makes decisions on which courses to keep and which to give up. If you receive this error message it is because you are trying to add a course with a credit weight which will place you over 17 credits in the fall or winter term. Note: It is strongly recommended that new students not exceed 15 credits per term.

Note: If you receive this error message when adding a multi-term course (a "D1/D2" full year course) to your record and you have room in the fall, it is possible that the "maximum hours exceeded" message refers to your credit load in the winter term. You must have enough room in both fall and winter terms before registering in full-year courses.

10.7 Add/Drop Period (or Course Change Period)

There is an Add/Drop Period (also knows as the Course Change Period) during both the fall and the winter terms. You can continue to make changes to your course registration (without penalty) until the Add/Drop deadlines for each term.  This allows you make adjustments to your course selection and to to "shop around" for courses that you may be interested in taking (even if you have not registered for these courses). From the beginning of the term until the end of Add/Drop, you may attend as many courses as your schedule will permit. Review your course syllabi before the end of the Add/Drop Period to help plan your semester and determine what is expected of you in each course.

Use Minerva to add or drop a course (follow the step-by-step instructions). All courses are limited by enrollment; therefore, do not wait until the last minute to register.

Courses dropped during the Add/Drop Period are deleted from your record. Your record will show only the courses in which you are registered after the Add/Drop period. If you drop a course within the deadlines, you will get a refund for the course; if you add a course during this period, you will be charged for the course.

As a freshman program student, you must have your changes approved by the SOUSA Advising Office.

Courses which are cancelled by the University are not automatically deleted from your record; you must access Minerva and delete the course(s).

If you find after the Add/Drop Period that you neglected to add a course, you will be required to make a written appeal to Service Point, requesting that the course(s) be added to your record. You must be able to explain adequately why you were unable to add the course(s) during the Add/Drop Period.

10.8 Verifying your student record

The purpose of verification is to ensure formally the accuracy of all student information. This includes program and course information, as well as personal information such as mailing and home addresses.

Students are responsible for ensuring that all information on their record is accurate. Inaccurate program or course registration may jeopardize graduation.

To verify your record check the following:

Once you have checked all of these points, if you have any problems or questions come to the Information Counter, SOUSA .

10.9 Registration errors

Before the end of the course change period for each term all students must use Minerva to check their course registration. Students should ensure that they are correctly registered in all courses they wish to complete. Students who notice errors in registration after registration deadlines have passed may request that the error be corrected. However, as students are responsible for checking their registration before published deadlines, normally only one correction is permitted per student during his/her academic career. Correcting a record when a registration error has been made is costly both in time and money, and in some instances may not be possible at all.

To request the correction of a registration error, students must submit an appeal to Service Point. the course registration form must be completed by the student and the course instructor(s), and there is a charge for each change that is made to a student record. In addition, the request to make the correction may be refused (if registration errors have been approved in previous terms) or may be submitted too late to be considered at all. Requests to correct registration errors must be made within one month of term end; requests made after this period may not be possible to approve even with a valid explanation and proper approval(s) from professor(s).

Procedure:

  • Obtain the Form to Correct Errors in Course Registration from Service Point , 3415 McTavish St.
  • Write a letter in which you explain clearly and concisely why you are making this request. Include the following information:
    • when you started and/or stopped attending the class
    • whether you tried making these changes yourself, and if so, when.
  • Take your letter and the form to your course instructor(s) and have the instructor(s) complete the appropriate areas of the form. Instructors are asked to indicate whether the student has been attending the course and, in the case of the addition of the course to a student record, whether the student will be permitted to register late.
  • Take the letter and the form to Service Point.

Note: Courses are not removed from the student's record when a registration error is corrected. A withdrawal from the course is granted.

10.10 Cancelling your registration

If you decide not to return to McGill in September or January after you have registered, drop all your courses on Minerva or submit a written request to cancel your registration.

In your letter include your McGill student number and your signature. Enclose your McGill student ID card and forward it to the following address:

Service Point, Enrolment Services
McGill University
3415 McTavish St.
Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3A 1Y1

Fax: 514-398-5544
Phone: 514-398-7878

Please check with Service Point for the deadline to cancel your registration. If you drop all courses or your request is received by this date, your registration will be deleted from our records and no administrative charge will be assessed. After this date you may still drop all your courses on Minerva but a minimum administrative charge is assessed.

10.11 Proof of enrolment

If you need a document confirming that you are registered as a student at McGill, you can download a proof of enrolment letter from Minerva. In some cases, you may need to visit Service Point to obtain additional documentation. For more information, head to mcgill.ca/student-records


11. Exams and assessment

11.1 Academic integrity

As a McGill student, you are responsible for knowing the rules and regulations concerning academic honesty, which can be found in The Handbook on Student Rights and Responsibilities. Perhaps more importantly, it is also your responsibility to help maintain the academic integrity of the University.

Cheating or plagiarizing by even one student hurts all students, because anything that undermines the evaluation process undermines the value of McGill's degrees. Therefore, carefully considered steps are taken to prevent students from cheating or plagiarizing and to catch those who do. Unfortunately, some students still resort to dishonesty, but any McGill student caught cheating or plagiarizing faces potentially serious consequences including, but not limited to, the possibility of conduct probation and a failure in the course; and such sanctions form a permanent part of the student's disciplinary record.

Some students try to justify cheating or plagiarism by claiming that they are pressured to outperform their classmates in order to succeed. There are two problems with this argument:

First, pressure to get good grades may explain the motivation to cheat, but it cannot justify actions that undermine the academic integrity of the University, and thereby debase the grades and degrees that students are striving for.

Second, McGill does not have a policy of "weeding out" a percentage of students. Indeed, we pride ourselves on the very high quality of our incoming students. We would like everyone who is accepted to McGill to succeed academically and to graduate with a degree. In addition, there is no policy in Science to grade students by how they rank in a class. Therefore, focus on mastering your course material, not on competing with your classmates.

Please visit the University's website on Integrity for more information:

11.2 Course evaluation and grading procedures

University Assessment Policy

The policy can be found on the Secretariat site.

Extract from the charter of student rights concerning course outlines

Regulations:

    1. No candidate for an examination may bring into the examination room any books, notes or other material containing information pertaining to the examination unless the examiner has given instructions that such material will be allowed. Anything brought into the examination room is subject to inspection.
    2. Calculators are not allowed unless otherwise specified. It is the candidate's responsibility to ascertain whether the use of calculators is permitted, and, if it is, whether any restrictions are imposed on the types of calculators that may be brought to the examination.
    3. Translation dictionaries (e.g., English-French) are allowable except in courses where knowledge of a language is one of the objectives of the course. Translation dictionaries must not include any definitions or synonyms.
    4. Other dictionaries (thesaurus, definitions, technical) are not allowed unless otherwise specified.
    5. Notwithstanding the above, electronic dictionaries, whether they are translation or otherwise, are never allowed.
    6. Talk or any other form of communication between candidates is forbidden.
    7. Candidates must not use or attempt to use any improper source of information. No information of any kind that might be of assistance to another candidate is to be written on the question paper.
    8. Students writing examinations are responsible for arriving at the right time and place. Forgetfulness or inadvertently arriving at the wrong time or place cannot be considered acceptable excuses. Candidates will be permitted to enter the examination room quietly up to one half hour after the scheduled start of the exam. After this time they will be admitted only by special permission of the Deputy Invigilator or the Chief Invigilator.
    9. Students must have with them their McGill student identification cards.
    10. Candidates are not permitted to leave the examination room until one half hour after the examination has begun, and in no case before the attendance has been taken.
    11. A candidate who leaves before the examination is over must hand in all completed and attempted work. All work must be done in accordance with the examination instructions, and must be handed in to the invigilator.
    12. The Exam Security Computer Monitoring Program may be used to detect pairs of students with unusually similar answer patterns on multiple-choice exams. Data generated by this program can be used as admissible evidence, either to initiate or corroborate an investigation or a charge of cheating under Section 16 of the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures.
    13. Any breach of these regulations will be reported to the Chief Invigilator and to the Disciplinary Officer of the student's faculty for appropriate action. A student found guilty of cheating or attempting to cheat is liable to expulsion from the University.
       

PROCEDURES:

  1. If books, notes, etc., cannot be left outside the examination room, they must be put in a place designated by the invigilator before the candidate.
  2. The doors of the examination room will normally be opened 10 minutes before the starting hour.
  3. Students may not leave the examination room during the last fifteen minutes of the exam.
  4. Candidates must remain seated. A candidate needing to speak to the invigilator (e.g., to ask for additional supplies or to request permission to leave the examination room for any reason) should so indicate by raising his or her hand.
  5. Questions concerning possible errors, ambiguities or omissions in the examination paper must be directed to the invigilator, who will investigate them through the proper channels. The invigilator is not permitted to answer questions other than those concerning the examination paper.
  6. At the close of the examination, candidates must stop writing and submit their work at once.

Letter grades

When a course is graded numerically, letter grades are assigned as follows for the purpose of calculations of grade point averages. Only letter grades will appear on the student's transcript.

Grade

Grade point

Percentages

A 4.0 85 -100
A- 3.7 80 - 84
B+ 3.3 75 - 79
B 3.0 70 - 74
B- 2.7 65 - 69
C+ 2.3 60 - 64
C 2.0 55 - 59
D (Conditional Pass) 1.0 50 - 54
F (Fail) 0 0 - 49

Grades may be reported on a Pass/Fail basis only in courses approved in advance by Faculty for such grading.

Failure and Conditional Pass

If a course with a final grade of F, J or D is required by the student's program, or if it is prerequisite to another course, the student must raise the mark to a C or better by supplemental examination, additional work when available, or by repeating the course. Students may also attempt the supplemental in elective courses where they have not received a mark of C or better, if they are eligible and feel that they will be able to obtain a satisfactory grade. Normally, a student in satisfactory or probationary standing is permitted to write up to two supplemental examinations for a maximum of eight credits.

Incompletes

i. Extension (K)

The special code of K should be used when you wish to extend the deadline for submission of course work. An extension of up to four months after the end of the course may be granted by the instructor for completion of term work. The student must have an acceptable reason for not having completed the work. The reason and the arrangements made with the student for completing the course must be reported on the form entitled "Submission of K", available from departmental offices. Note that students must sign this form. It is not necessary to submit a copy of the form to Service Point.

Grades of K must be cleared by April 30 for fall-term courses and by July 30 for winter-term and courses spanning fall and winter terms or they will change to KF's and will the affect the GPA. The K is replaced by the mark on the external documents (transcripts) but appears on internal documents, such as verification forms, along with the final mark, enabling the adviser to offer suggestions should any student show a great number of them.

ii. Further extension (KE)

An extension beyond the 4-month period must be approved by the Director of Advising Services (SOUSA) and by the instructor. Students are asked to submit a letter of request to the Director (SOUSA) which should include:

  • method of course evaluation (papers, research project, examination);
  • statement of how much work, both written and research, has been completed to date;
  • statement of how much work remains to be completed, and a timetable; date to which student is seeking extension; students graduating in October must have their work submitted by August 30, and their course grade must reach the Office of the Director of Advising Services by September 15;
  • other courses the student is taking in the upcoming semester and the total number of credits;
  • reasons why course work was not completed within the time period of the first extension. For K grades granted in fall courses, this date is April 30; July 30 for K grades granted in winter courses and courses spanning fall and winter.
  • Professor's permission to grant an additional extension to the date stated above should be included, as well as documents when appropriate (in cases of medical or family affliction).
  • A demanding course schedule will not normally be grounds for granting a KE grade. Requests will be considered on their merit; insufficiently supported requests will not be granted.

iii. Failed to meet the extended deadline (KF)

If a student does not complete this work within the extended period, the grade becomes KF and counts as a failure in the calculation of the CGPA.

iv. Absent (J)

The special code J (absent) counts as an F (Failure) in calculation of the student's grade point averages. The grade of J must be given when the student did not write the final exam(including take-home exams).

The grade of J may also be given if the student did not complete another part of the course requirements and has not arranged with the instructor to receive an incomplete (K). In this case, however, the grade of J should only be given under these conditions:

  • the weight of the missing work/exam in the calculation of the mark is sufficient that the student cannot earn a passing mark when given a zero for the missing work/exam; for example, a student missing a paper worth 70% of the mark should be given a J;

    or
  • the instructor has announced at the beginning of the course that a J will be given if the work/exam is not submitted/written, even if the student has earned a passing grade in the course with the missing work/exam.

Students who receive a J have the right to request that their grade be based on their course work only. There are some conditions. Please see this section of the Calendar.

v. Deferred (L)

Students who have not written the final examination for valid and officially documented reasons, such as serious illness or family affliction, may receive permission to apply for a deferred exam. Permission is granted only by Service Point in Enrolment Services. The deferred examination period is held after the April examinations for fall-term courses and the last week of August for winter-term courses and courses spanning fall and winter terms. Courses taken in other faculties other than Arts and Science may have different deferred examination periods. Special arrangements to write deferred exams at other times are not allowed other than for the most exceptional reasons, such as for a graduating student. Students must appeal to Service Point for consideration.

vi. Withdrawn (W)

A special code of W, WL (withdrawn from deferred exam) or WF (withdrawn failure) appears on the mark report beside the names of students known to have withdrawn from a course. Permission to withdraw from a course or from the University after the course withdrawal deadline is granted only by Service Point for valid and officially documented reasons such as illness or family affliction. Grades of WL or WF are only granted by Service Point for valid and documented reasons.

vii. Pending (NA)

A special code of NA is entered by the SOUSA Office for a student whose grade is not yet available for exceptional reasons other than an extension of the deadline for work submitted (K).

viii. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U)

Students may designate elective courses outside of their program requirements to be graded under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option. Courses with final grades of S or U will not count towards program requirements (including the freshman program). If students have inadvertently selected a required course for the S/U option, they must complete a substitute course which has been approved by their adviser to fulfil the program requirement. Below is a summary of the conditions which apply to the S/U option:

  • the S/U option may not exceed 10% of a student's credits taken at McGill to fulfil the degree requirements (e.g. 10% x 90-credit program = 9 credits);
  • the S/U option may be applied to elective courses only;
  • a maximum of one course per term may be taken on the S/U option;
  • students may select the S/U option only during the Drop/Add period;
  • appeals to remove the S/U option after Drop/Add period and before the end of term must be submitted in writing to the Director of Advising Services(SOUSA); they will be granted only when a student has accidentally added the option to a required course;
  • all other appeals will be refused; students need not appeal to have the S/U option added;
  • no appeals will be accepted after the last day of classes; if the course in question is required for a student's program, and the term has ended, then an alternative course must be selected in consultation with the departmental adviser(s);
  • the S/U option will be converted as follows: grades of A through C are converted to S, grades of D, F, and J are converted to U;
  • all S/U courses will be excluded when calculating the grade point average, but will be included in the total of "McGill credits attempted". Courses completed with a grade of S will be included in "McGill credits earned";
  • S/U courses will count in the course load calculation for determination of part-time or full-time status;
  • to be considered for undergraduate scholarships, prizes, medals, awards, and the honorific designations such as Dean's Honour List, students may not use S/U courses toward their course load minima;
  • the S/U option is not open to Special, Visiting, Exchange, or IUT students;

The S/U option will be confidential on MINERVA. A student may be able to verify the S/U option on Minerva during the term. This choice will not appear anywhere on the student's printed record until such time as the grade is recorded. It is up to the student to ensure that he/she does not exceed the overall number of S/U credits permitted. No checks will be made until the time of graduation, and excessive S grades at that time will prevent graduation.

Mark changes

Instructors should use the grade change module on Minerva to submit mark changes or final marks for previously incomplete Science courses. Be sure to inform your department of the change so that they can approve it on Minerva in a timely fashion.

Posting of marks

Departments need not post final marks which were submitted electronically to Service Point. Students can check the Minerva Web site for their grades. All posted marks or grades (whether final or interim) may identify the students by student number only, not by name.

Reassessments and rereads

In accordance with the Charter of Student Rights, and subject to the conditions stated therein, students have the right to consult any written submission for which they have received a mark, to discuss this submission with the examiner, and to obtain an impartial and competent review of any mark.

The Faculty recognizes two types of impartial reviews: reassessments of course work (i.e. of term papers, mid-terms, assignments, quizzes, etc.) and rereads of final examinations. In both cases, rather than re-correct the work and grade it as they would have done themselves, reviewers assess the appropriateness of the original grade based, for example, on the application of the grading key to the student's work. If a grade is deemed unfair, it is changed, whether the new grade is higher or lower than the original – i.e., the reviewer's grade takes precedence over the original grade.

Reassessment of Course Work

Reassessments of course work are administered and conducted solely by the units involved according to procedures specified by the units and made available to staff and students. Requests for such reassessments must be made within 10 working days after the graded material has been made available for students to view it. Reassessments should normally be completed within 20 working days of the request.

Rereads of Final Examinations

Rereads of final examinations are administered by Service Point, but conducted by the units involved. Students must apply to Service Point (use the online form) by March 31 for courses in the Fall term and by September 30 for courses in the Winter or Summer terms (these deadlines are strictly enforced and no requests for rereads will be accepted past them). Students are assessed a fee of $35 for such rereads. It is strongly recommended, but not required, that students consult the instructor of the course before requesting a reread of a final examination.

Reassessments and rereads in courses not in the Faculty of Science are subject to the deadlines, rules and regulations of the relevant faculty.

Plagiarism and cheating

Students should be reminded that plagiarism is an extremely serious offence. They should be given appropriate guidance as to what might be considered "plagiarism" in submitting work. Students should also consult the Academic Integrity Website at Academic Integrity.

The possession or use of unauthorized materials in any test or examination constitutes cheating. Data generated by the Exam Security Monitoring Program can be used as admissible evidence either to initiate or corroborate an investigation or a charge of cheating under Section 16 of the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures.

Allegations of plagiarism and cheating together with the evidence should be referred to the Disciplinary Officer of the student's faculty. It is the Disciplinary Officer's responsibility to determine if plagiarism or cheating has occurred and, if so, to determine the penalty.

The University policy on the academic offences of plagiarism and cheating is outlined in the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures available from the Office of the Dean of Students.

Deadlines for mark submission

It is essential that marks be submitted by the following deadlines:

  • fall courses
first day before lectures begin in January
  • winter courses and courses spanning fall and winter
with no final exam
with final exam, grad
with final exam, non-grad

one week after lectures end in April
one week after date of exam
two weeks after date of exam
  • supplemental and deferred examinations
within 3 days of the examination
 
  • additional work
within 3 days of the supplemental/ deferred examination period
 
  • grades of K for fall courses
April 30
 
  • grades of K for winter courses
    and courses spanning fall and winter
July 30
  • grades of K for summer courses
    and courses spanning fall and winter
November 15

11.3 Final examinations

Formal final examinations are held during an examination period following the term in which the course is given (fall and winter terms only). The dates of the examination periods are listed in the Important Dates. Students are warned not to make travel arrangements to leave Montreal prior to the scheduled end of any examination period. In some courses there is no final examination; standing in these courses is determined on the basis of term work and class tests. Information regarding exam conflicts.

Note: Students who do not have a valid university I.D. from their home university must go to Service Point (3415 McTavish St) within 24 hours to have their signature verified. Students who neglect to do so will have their grade withheld and may be blocked from registration on Minerva. Students in their final year will be blocked from graduation.

11.4 University examination regulations as they apply to B.Sc. and B.A. & Sc. students

All final exams are governed by the University regulations and by the specific regulations of the Faculty administering the course.

Regulations:

PROCEDURES:

  1. No candidate for an examination may bring into the examination room any books, notes or other material containing information pertaining to the examination unless the examiner has given instructions that such material will be allowed. Anything brought into the examination room is subject to inspection.
  2. Calculators are not allowed unless otherwise specified. It is the candidate's responsibility to ascertain whether the use of calculators is permitted, and, if it is, whether any restrictions are imposed on the types of calculators that may be brought to the examination.
  3. Translation dictionaries (e.g., English-French) are allowable except in courses where knowledge of a language is one of the objectives of the course. Translation dictionaries must not include any definitions or synonyms.
  4. Other dictionaries (thesaurus, definitions, technical) are not allowed unless otherwise specified.
  5. Notwithstanding the above, electronic dictionaries, whether they are translation or otherwise, are never allowed.
  6. Talk or any other form of communication between candidates is forbidden.
  7. Candidates must not use or attempt to use any improper source of information. No information of any kind that might be of assistance to another candidate is to be written on the question paper.
  8. Students writing examinations are responsible for arriving at the right time and place. Forgetfulness or inadvertently arriving at the wrong time or place cannot be considered acceptable excuses. Candidates will be permitted to enter the examination room quietly up to one hour after the scheduled start of the exam. After this time they will be admitted only by special permission of the Deputy Invigilator or the Chief Invigilator.
  9. Students must have with them their McGill student identification cards.
  10. Candidates are not permitted to leave the examination room until one hour after the examination has begun, and in no case before the attendance has been taken.
  11. A candidate who leaves before the examination is over must hand in all completed and attempted work. All work must be done in accordance with the examination instructions, and must be handed in to the invigilator.
  12. The Exam Security Computer Monitoring Program may be used to detect pairs of students with unusually similar answer patterns on multiple-choice exams. Data generated by this program can be used as admissible evidence, either to initiate or corroborate an investigation or a charge of cheating under Section 16 of the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures.
  13. Any breach of these regulations will be reported to the Chief Invigilator and to the Disciplinary Officer of the student's faculty for appropriate action. A student found guilty of cheating or attempting to cheat is liable to expulsion from the University.
  14. If books, notes, etc., cannot be left outside the examination room, they must be put in a place designated by the invigilator before the candidate.
  15. The doors of the examination room will normally be opened 10 minutes before the starting hour.
  16. Students may not leave the examination room during the last fifteen minutes of the exam.
  17. Candidates must remain seated. A candidate needing to speak to the invigilator (e.g., to ask for additional supplies or to request permission to leave the examination room for any reason) should so indicate by raising his or her hand.
  18. Questions concerning possible errors, ambiguities or omissions in the examination paper must be directed to the invigilator, who will investigate them through the proper channels. The invigilator is not permitted to answer questions other than those concerning the examination paper.
  19. At the close of the examination, candidates must stop writing and submit their work at once.

11.5 Reassessment and rereads

  • Reassessments and rereads for Science courses are subject to the deadlines, rules, and regulations outlined in eCalendar (click on link above for details).
  • Reassessments and rereads for Arts courses are subject to the deadlines, rules, and regulations outlined in eCalendar (click on link above for details).

Reassessments and rereads in courses not in the Faculties of Arts and of Science are subject to the deadlines, rules, and regulations of the relevant faculty.

Science students apply directly to the unit involved for reassessment of coursework, and through a webform for rereads of final exams.

11.6 Deferred examinations

Science students who, for serious reasons such as illness or family affliction, have not written one or more examinations (including take-home examinations), may request permission from Service Point to defer the examination to the next supplemental examination period, (except for courses offered by the Faculties of Engineering and Continuing Education, where students write the examination the next time the course is given).
Students should be aware that all requests are subject to review and that deferred examinations are granted only for compelling reasons, verified and accepted by Service Point . Supporting evidence such as an appropriate medical report may be required. Service Point must be informed as soon as possible after the examination of the reason for their absence from the examination.

If you are considering applying for a deferred exam, you should seek the advice of your SOUSA Faculty adviser beforehand. Your adviser can help you with decisions concerning whether it is best to request an exam deferral or late course withdrawal, what your course load should be for the next term, and so forth. We recommend you come in to the SOUSA counter in Dawson Hall for a Same-Day advising session.

The deferred application is available online through Minerva on the Student Record Menu. The deadlines for applying for deferred examinations is found on the Exams website.

If the request is approved, an L will appear in place of a grade in such courses. The grade obtained in the deferred examination after it has been written will replace the grade of L on the student's official transcript.

No supplemental examinations are available for students who receive a grade of D, F, J, or U in a course after a deferred examination. Such students must either re-register in the same course the following term or in an approved course substitute.

If deferred status is not granted, the student will receive a grade of J in the course, which will count as a failure in the GPA and CGPA. The student may, however, be allowed to write a supplemental examination.

Students in Summer Session courses should check with Service Point on the availability and restrictions on deferred and supplementary examinations in such courses.

In the event of illness, it is recommended that students consult the McGill Health Service. Official documentation may be required in support of a request to Service Point for deferred examinations.

Students who have already written an examination may not subsequently request that the exam be deferred. Such students should consult their faculty office regarding the availability of supplemental examinations.

Students who are approved for a deferred exam and who choose to write the original exam anyway must inform Service Point immediately to have their deferred exam cancelled.

Please read here for more information about deferred exam application procedures and the upcoming deferred examination schedule.

11.7 Supplemental examinations

Students who wish to write supplemental examinations for certain courses must apply on Minerva through the Student Records Menu.

The following conditions apply:

  • students must be in satisfactory or probationary standing;
  • students must have received a final grade of D, F, J or U in the course;
  • special permission is required if a student wishes to write supplementals totaling more than 8 credits;
  • only one supplemental examination is allowed in a course;
  • the supplemental result may count for 100% of the final grade or may include the same proportion of class work as did the original grade; the instructor will announce the arrangements to be used for the course by the end of the course change period;
  • the format and content of the supplemental examination (e.g., multiple choice or essay questions) will not necessarily be the same as the format for the final examination, so students should consult the instructor;
  • the supplemental result will not erase the grade originally obtained; both the original mark and the supplemental result will be calculated in the CGPA;
  • additional credit will not be given for a supplemental exam where the original grade for the course was a D and the student already received credit for the course;
  • supplemental examinations in courses outside the Faculties of Arts or of Science are subject to the deadlines, rules and regulations of the relevant faculty;
  • no supplemental examinations are available for students who fail to achieve satisfactory grades in a course with a deferred examination.

If you are considering applying for a supplemental exam, you should seek the advice of your SOUSA Faculty Adviser beforehand. Your adviser can help you with decisions concerning whether it is best to apply for a supplemental exam, what your course load should be for the next term, and so forth. We recommend you to come in during your Faculty Adviser's drop in hours which are posted above.

For information about the procedures, rules and regulations pertaining to supplemental exams, please refer to the Exam Office website.

11.8 Illness

11.8.1 Missed assignments

If, due to illness, you have missed assignments or mid-term examinations, see your professor and try to make alternative arrangements. You must be prepared to provide confirmation of illness. Examinations for multi-term courses during the fall-term final examination period in December are treated as mid-terms and alternative arrangements must be made with the professor.

If you have fallen too far behind to catch up in a course, you should see your Faculty adviser (who is listed on your Minerva transcript) in Dawson Hall, to discuss your options. These include asking your professors for extensions (although not all profs allow this), applying for a late course withdrawal (even if the withdrawal deadline has passed) or applying to defer a final exam. If you are too ill to come in person, contact your Faculty adviser by email. All requests for late course withdrawals and deferred exams are handled by Service Point.

If you have missed the final examination, you should come in with medical documentation within a week after the examination date to apply for a deferred examination. The medical certificate must cover the date of the missed examination and indicate the nature and duration of the illness.

11.8.2 Missed final exam

If you have missed the final examination, you should go to Service Point with medical documentation within a week after the examination date to apply for a deferred examination. The medical certificate must cover the date of the missed examination and indicate the nature and duration of the illness.

If you are ill the day of your exam, think carefully about your ability to complete the exam. Once you sit for the exam, the grade you earn will remain on your record and cannot be changed. If you have a fever or are quite nauseous, it is best not to enter the exam room at all.


12. Internships and field studies

Internships are available for B.Sc. and B.A. & Sc. students. B.A. & Sc. students may earn credit for some internships through the Faculty of Arts.

› Faculty of Science Internship & Field Studies Office
› Faculty of Arts Internship Program

12.1 Credit for internship courses for B.A. & Sc. students

B.A. & Sc. students may be permitted to receive a maximum of 6 credits for internships to be used towards their degree requirements. There are three types of internships that are eligible for credit.

Internships courses offered by McGill Departments

  • Internships allow students to gain experience in areas relevant to their fields of study.
  • Internships are only open to U2 and U3 students in good standing, normally after completing 30 credits of a 90-credit program or 45 credits of a 96 to a 120-credit program, who have a minimum CGPA of 2.7 and permission from the departmental Internship Adviser.
  • Internships will normally not fulfill program requirements for seminar or 400-level courses.
  • Internships involve a minimum of 150 hours of work with an approved host institution or organization and provide a vehicle for allowing students to gain up to 3 credits towards their degrees.
  • At the completion of the internship, students must submit a major topical paper that discusses an aspect of the Internship from an academic perspective.

The Washington Semester Program at the American University

B.A. & Sc. students can apply to this program by following the steps and submitting the required forms described in the Independent Study Away section of this handbook.

  1. B.A. & Sc. students must complete the following components of the program:
    • Seminar I (four credits)
    • Seminar II (four credits)
    • Internship
    • Research project (four credits)
  2. Twelve (12) transfer credits will be granted provided all the following conditions are satisfied:
    • All components must be completed with a grade of C or better.
    • If any of the grades are below C, 4 credits will be granted only for the component in which the final grade is C or better, except for the internship, for which a maximum of three (3) credits may be awarded.
    • The method of evaluation for each seminar course and the research project must consist of written exams or term papers. Students should confirm this requirement before registering in the program.
    • Students must arrange for The Dean of the Washington Semester Program at the American University to send a letter that includes a Grade Report Summary directly to the Student Affairs Office of the Faculties of Arts and of Science. The Grade Report Summary must confirm the satisfactory completion of the program with a grade of C or better in each of the two seminar courses, the internship and the research project.
  3. Students who satisfy the four conditions above and wish to apply to receive three (3) additional credits for the internship must proceed as indicated below.
    • Submit a letter specifying the reasons for requesting transfer credits for the internship and indicating how the internship relates to their academic program(s) to the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Science.
    • Arrange to have the internship supervisor send a letter that indicates the academic nature of the internship (analytical content and method of evaluation) as well as an evaluation of the student’s performance directly to the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Science. Students should request the Student Affairs Office to send a copy of this letter to the department in the Faculty of Arts or Faculty of Science that will evaluate the internship (see #3 below) and to their program adviser(s).
    • Arrange to have the departmental/program academic adviser in the most appropriate department in the Faculty of Arts or Faculty of Science evaluate the letter from the internship supervisor as well as all t