Coronavirus (COVID-19) updates

› For the latest information on McGill's response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, please visit https://www.mcgill.ca/coronavirus.

› For Faculty of Science FAQs (including S/U info), please visit https://www.mcgill.ca/science/covid-19.

Remote learning in Fall 2020

Undergraduate Handbook

The Faculty of Science's Undergraduate Handbook is your guide to obtaining a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts & Science degree at McGill University. Read the Handbook in conjunction with the eCalendar, which is the definitive authority on all courses and programs at McGill.

Don't hesitate to ask for advice!

Neither the Handbook nor the eCalendar is a substitute for speaking with an academic adviser. See your SOUSA advisor's Same-Day advising schedule and come in for a visit.


Table of contents

1. Applying

› 1.1 Applying to the Bachelor of Science degree

› 1.2 Applying to the Bachelor of Arts & Science degree

› 1.3 Applying to the Bachelor of Arts degree

› 1.4 Second Bachelor degree

2. Orientation

› 2.1 Welcome to the Faculty of Science 

› 2.2 Discover McGill

› 2.3 Program-specific orientation sessions

› 2.4 B.Sc Degree requirements (from the eCalendar)

› 2.5 B.A.&Sc. Degree requirements (from the eCalendar)

3. Your first year

› 3.1 Course approval forms

› 3.2 The freshman program (U0)

› 3.2.5 Note about registering for freshman courses

› 3.3 First year for students exempt from the freshman program (U1)

› 3.4 Freshman Interest Groups

› 3.5 First-year seminars

4. Later years

› 4.1 Finishing your first year

› 4.2 Bachelor of Science students

> 4.2.1 Restrictions on courses outside the Faculty of Science

› 4.3 Bachelor of Arts & Science students

5. Exchanges and study away

› 5.1 McGill student exchange programs

› 5.2 Study at a Quebec university (IUT)

› 5.3 Independent study away

› 5.4 Summer studies at a university outside Quebec

› 5.5 Transfer credits

6. Degree transfers

› 6.1 Limits on eligibility to apply for a degree transfer

› 6.2 Transfer requirements and instructions

› 6.3 Appeals

› 6.4 Next steps

› 6.5 Advice

7. Readmission

8. Special, visiting and incoming exchange students

› 8.1 Getting started at McGill

› 8.2 Advising appointments

› 8.3 Selecting courses as a special, visiting or exchange student

› 8.4 What to do if you experience difficulties

› 8.5 Extending your time at McGill

9. Academic advice

› 9.1 Making academic decisions

› 9.2 Self-assessment

› 9.3 Study skills

› 9.4 Failing a course

10. Choosing courses

› 10.1 Credit load

› 10.2 English and French second language courses

› 10.3 Language courses

› 10.4 600-level courses

11. Course and program registration

› 11.1 Online registration system

› 11.2 Registering for programs

› 11.3 Registering for courses

› 11.4 Courses offered by faculties other than Arts and Science

› 11.5 Tips on handling registration problems

› 11.6 Course change period

› 11.7 Verifying your student record

› 11.8 Registration errors

› 11.9 Cancelling your registration

› 11.10 Proof of enrolment

12. Exams and assessment

› 12.1 Academic integrity

› 12.2 Course evaluation and grading procedures

› 12.3 Final examinations

› 12.4 University examination regulations

› 12.5 Reassessment and rereads

› 12.6 Deferred examinations

› 12.7 Supplemental examinations

› 12.8 Illness

13. Internships and field studies

› 13.1 Credit for internship courses for B.A. & Sc. students

14. Withdrawals

› 14.1 Course withdrawals

› 14.2 University withdrawals

15. Graduating

› 15.1 Graduation checklists

› 15.2 Frequently asked questions about graduation


1. Applying

If you are interested in pursuing undergraduate science studies at McGill, you should consider applying to any one of the following degrees:

› Bachelor of Science
› Bachelor of Arts & Science
› Bachelor of Arts

Undergraduate applications are handled by Enrolment Services. Visit mcgill.ca/applying to find out more about the application process, including application deadlines, admissions criteria, special requirements for specific programs, language proficiency requirements, visa requirements, transcript requirements, and more.

If you are already a McGill undergraduate student and wish to return to your studies after an absence of part of an academic year or longer, or you wish to transfer to the Faculty of Science from another McGill faculty, you will need to apply through the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA), not Enrolment Services. For more information, please see:

› Readmission
› Inter-faculty transfers

1.1 Applying to the Bachelor of Science degree

When you apply for admission to the Bachelor of Science degree, you will be asked to nominate one of the following program groups and a major/subject within that group:

  • Biological, Biomedical and Life Sciences Group
  • Bio-Physical-Computational Sciences Group
  • Neuroscience Group
  • Physical, Earth, Math and Computer Science Group

It is important to apply for the group that interests you most because, if you are admitted, your choice of a major or honours program will be limited to the options available in that group.

If you later decide you wish to pursue a program in a different program group, you will need to apply for an intra-faculty transfer, subject to academic performance, availability and other conditions.

1.1.2 Bachelor of Science program groups

The options available within each program group are as follows:

Biological, Biomedical and Life Sciences Group

Biological, Biomedical & Life Sciences Group

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 9, 2020).

Bio-Physical-Computational Sciences Group

Neuroscience Group

Neuroscience Group

Major Program

Honours Program

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 9, 2020).

Physical, Earth, Math and Computer Science Group

Physical, Earth, Math & Computer Science Group

Major Programs

Honours Programs

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Feb. 17, 2020).

New applicants may select the Neuroscience group only if they are exempt from the freshman science requirements – e.g. applicants with a Quebec CEGEP diploma. All other applicants may seek entry to the neuroscience program once they have completed their freshman requirements, typically at the end of their first year.

If you are likely to be granted exemptions from some or all of the freshman science requirements based on advanced standing or transfer credits, you can select a major/subject from your chosen group at the time of your application. Alternatively, you can select the option ‘Undeclared’ if you wish to make this decision at a later time.

If you are not likely to be granted exemptions from any of the freshman science requirements, select ‘Freshman Science’ as your major/subject.

The online application form allows you to make two program choices for a single application fee. You may choose two different Science program groups, or choose one Science group and a program from another faculty. Applicants are encouraged to use both choices, putting their preferred choice first. Both choices will be considered and you will receive an admission decision on both. If you wish to apply for more than two programs, you will need to submit another application and pay an additional application fee.

1.2 Applying to the Bachelor of Arts & Science degree

The B.A. & Sc. degree, jointly offered through the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science, is designed for students who have clearly-defined interests in both Arts and Science. While the degree provides a broad education that includes in-depth study of disciplines in both Faculties, the number of elective courses a student can take is limited. Students entering the B.A. & Sc. program therefore must know in precisely which disciplines they wish to focus. Note that students who intend to pursue graduate studies in science or to attend medical school may have to complete additional courses as electives or beyond the basic degree requirements.

1.3 Applying to the Bachelor of Arts degree

There are four units within the Faculty of Science that offer B.A. degrees through the Faculty of Arts as well as B.Sc. degrees through the Faculty of Science. They are the School of Computer Science, the Department of Geography, the Department of Mathematics & Statistics, and the Department of Psychology.

One reason to consider a B.A. over a B.Sc. is if you have the prerequisites for computer science, geography, mathematics and statistics, or psychology, but do not have all the basic science prerequisites needed for admission to a B.Sc. In the case of computer science, bear in mind that computer science programs have a strong mathematics component regardless of whether you choose the B.A. or B.Sc. stream.

You might also choose to apply for admission to a Bachelor of Arts because you wish to pursue a particular program combination only available in a B.A. – e.g. Joint Honours in English and Mathematics.

1.4 Second Bachelor degree

Information on how to apply to either the B.Sc. or the B.A. & Sc. as a second bachelor degree after the completion of a first bachelor degree can be found on the Admissions website.

For information on taking a B.Sc. or B.A. & Sc. as a second degree concurrently with a first degree, please contact pete.barry [at] mcgill.ca (Pete Barry), Chief Academic Adviser in Science.


2. Orientation

2.1 Welcome to the Faculty of Science

The Faculty of Science's New Students' Guide is a must-read for all new Science and Arts & Science students.

 B.Sc. New Students' Guide - will be available soon.
 B.A. & Sc. New Students' Guide - will be available soon.

2.2 Discover McGill

Orientation Week is a great opportunity for new students to familiarize themselves with the campus. Students beginning a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts & Science degree are urged to attend the Faculty of Science's Discover McGill events during O-Week.

Tuesday, August 25, 2020

 

2.3 Program-specific orientation sessions

 

During O-Week there are also orientation sessions for each of the undergraduate science programs. These sessions may be more useful for students who have completed, or are exempt from, the freshman science requirements, but in many cases freshman students are equally welcome to attend.

program orientation schedule will be available soon.

2.4 B.Sc. degree requirements (from the eCalendar)

Faculty Degree Requirements for the Faculty of Science

Each student in the Faculty of Science must be aware of the Faculty regulations as stated in this publication and on the McGill, Science, and SOUSA websites.

While departmental and faculty advisers and staff are always available to give advice and guidance, the ultimate responsibility for completeness and correctness of course selection and registration, for compliance with, and completion of, program and degree requirements, and for the observance of regulations and deadlines, rests with you. It is your responsibility to seek guidance from the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) if in any doubt; misunderstanding or misapprehension will not be accepted as cause for dispensation from any regulation, deadline, program, or degree requirement.

To be eligible for a B.Sc. degree, you must fulfil all Faculty and program requirements as indicated below:

Faculty and program requirements
Minimum Credit Requirement
Residency Requirement
Refer to University Regulations and Resources > Undergraduate > Student Records > Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA)
Time and Credit Limit for the Completion of the Degree
Program Requirements
Course Requirements
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Jan. 9, 2020).

2.5 B.A.&Sc. degree requirements (from the eCalendar)

Degree Requirements for Bachelor of Arts and Science

Each student pursuing a B.A. & Sc. must be aware of the regulations as stated in this section of this publication, on the McGill website, and on the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) website.

While departmental and Faculty advisers and staff are always available to give advice and guidance, the ultimate responsibility for completeness and correctness of course selection and registration, for compliance with, and completion of, program and degree requirements, and for the observance of regulations and deadlines rests with you. It is your responsibility to seek guidance from the SOUSA Office if in any doubt; misunderstanding or misapprehension will not be accepted as cause for dispensation from any regulation, deadline, program, or degree requirement.

To be eligible for a B.A. & Sc., you must fulfil all Faculty degree and program requirements as indicated in the following sections:

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2020-2021 (last updated Feb. 17, 2020).


3. Your first year

Help line for newly admitted Science and Arts & Science students
514-398-5442
Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

The courses you do in your first year as a Science or Arts & Science student at McGill will depend on what you did before you arrived.

Some students will spend their first year completing a number of basic courses known as the freshman program. When you start at this level, you will usually need a minimum of four years to complete your degree.

Other students may receive an exemption from some or all of the required freshman courses, which may allow them to complete their degree in as little as three years.

Do any of the following categories apply to you?

Students admitted with a Quebec CEGEP diploma

If you have a D.E.C. in Science or in Integrated Arts and Science, you will be granted 30 credits of advance standing, equivalent to completing the freshman requirements.

If you have a D.E.C. in another field, you may still have some freshman requirements to complete.

In either case, students in this category can proceed directly into a major and will be in a position to complete their degree in three years.

Students admitted with a secondary school qualification from outside Quebec

If you have a Canadian or US high school diploma, an International, French or European Baccalaureate, a GCE A Level, or some other pre-university educational qualification, you may be eligible for advanced standing, exempting you from some of the freshman requirements.

If you are granted sufficient advance standing, you will be able to declare your major immediately. If not, you will need to complete your outstanding freshman requirements first. Students in this category are likely to need at least four years to complete their degree.

Students in this category must submit a course approval form to the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) to find out whether they have any outstanding freshman requirements to complete.

Students who have already completed some university study

If you have completed previous university studies, you may be eligible for transfer credits. This is in addition to any advance standing you may be eligible for based on your secondary-level studies. Together, transfer credits and advance standing may exempt you from some or all of the freshman requirements.

Students in this category must submit a course approval form  (available as of June 1st) to the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) to find out whether they have any outstanding freshman requirements to complete.

Any remaining transfer credits beyond the freshman courses from your previous university studies will appear on your Minerva transcript as TRNS XXX (generic transfer credits) and are dealt with by the Faculty of Science. A Registrar’s Hold may be placed on your record until you have completed the process of having these credits evaluated, see below for details.

It is important to note that courses previously taken prior to attending McGill may count as program requirements and must be evaluated for course equivalency. Make sure that you do not register for a course at McGill for which you have an exemption as you will not receive credit if you take the same course a second time.

In order to determine course equivalency follow the steps listed below.

  • Email mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier), with a copy of your unofficial transcript to start the process.
  • All courses taken prior to coming to McGill, for which you have not already received advanced standing credits from Admissions, must be approved using the Course Equivalency System.
  • Search the Course Equivalency System to determine if the course you have to taken has already been approved. You may want to use the “External” course number and then “Country” or “Institution” to determine if the course has already been approved. Make sure you also tick off “Include Expired Decisions”. The course may have already been approved, but might be expired, which means you will have to request a “Reassessment”. (See FAQs).
  • If the course appears on the database, email Mary, providing the following information: Course number at host university and Approved McGill Equivalency
  • If the course is not on the course database, then you must login (using your McGill email address and password) and “Submit a Request”. For further information on using the system, please go to Frequently asked questions and Course syllabus checklist
  • In addition to the required list of syllabus information, detailed on the Course Syllabus Checklist, you must also ensure that the syllabus contains the following information:

Institution's name
Course number
Course description (content)
Date of course/syllabus (year/term)

  • Submit your request(s).

Once your courses have been officially approved on the course database, you must send a follow up email to Mary with the following information: Course number at host university and Approved McGill equivalency.

You must also add all courses to the “Minerva Transfer Credit Assessment Form”. You can only access the form as of September 2nd. To access this form go to: Minerva > Student Records Administration Menu > Exchange/Study Away Menu > Transfer Credit Assessment. Only courses that appear on the Course Equivalency System can be added to the Transfer Credit Assessment Form. For further information, please refer to the Help Field on Minerva.

Once all of your courses have been evaluated, your Minerva transcript will be updated to reflect the McGill course equivalencies.

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca (Mary Gauthier).

Non-degree students

Exchange students, visiting students and special students are not required to follow a specific McGill program.

Students in this category need to work closely with their student adviser to find the best courses to meet their needs.


3.1 Course approval forms

The B.Sc. course approval form for Fall 2020 and Winter 2021 is now closed. Please check your Minerva advising transcript for the name of your assigned SOUSA advisor and contact them directly if you have questions about course selection. You can see their contact info and advising schedule here. You do not need to see an advisor before registering for courses, but you should check with your advisor afterwards.

All newly admitted degree students, except those with a Quebec CEGEP diploma, must complete a course approval form. The information you provide will allow your academic adviser to tell you where you stand in relation to the freshman program requirements.  The course approval form will be available as of June 1st.

› B.Sc. course approval form
› B.A. & Sc. course approval form


3.2 The freshman program

Students who need 97 or more credits to complete their degree requirements (4-year degree) are automatically registered in the freshman program.

3.2.1 Entering the freshman program

All newly admitted Science and Arts & Science students must complete our online course approval form. Please note that you can register before receiving approval, but you should still get your courses approved before the end of August. Note that you must register for at least ONE course by August 14 to avoid late registration fees.

The steps you need to follow to select your courses, get academic advice and register are set out below. Please read this information carefully. The dates provided here are a guide only; for exact dates and deadlines, visit mcgill.ca/importantdates.

Inform yourself: June - August

Find out if you are eligible for advanced standing

Newly admitted students may receive advanced standing for university work completed elsewhere, or in another faculty at McGill, or for results in International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, Advanced Placement tests or the Diploma in Collegial Studies.

It is essential that you know if you will be granted credit and course exemption for work completed elsewhere as you will not be given additional credit towards your degree for any McGill course where the content overlaps substantially with any other course for which you have already received credit, such as for advanced standing results.

For information about advanced standing credits as a result of the tests mentioned above, please refer to the following: advanced standing and Science placement examinations.

If you have completed university studies elsewhere, please ensure that you include this information in the online freshman course approval form (available in early June), which you will be submitting to your Faculty adviser, as listed farther below. Your adviser will be able to inform you about possible course equivalences and exemptions from your freshman program requirements.

Get advice: June 1 - September 15

From the beginning of term (June until the end of the drop/add period in September our team of academic advisers in the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) Office will be available in a variety of ways (see below) to provide you with information and answer your questions. We provide service all year, but our schedule may change periodically.

If, after reading the information in the eCalendar and this website, you need clarification or have questions of an advising nature, contact us at newstudentadvising.science [at] mcgill.ca (please include your full name and McGill ID number in your email).

When emailing the advisers, please include your name and student number in the subject line. Make sure to use your McGill email address, which should be activated as soon as you confirm that you will be coming to McGill. Please read the following information about McGill's new email policy, email communication with students

Allow at least seven business days for the advisers to respond to your questions. You will receive a response. Please do not send your questions to other people in the university as this will slow the advising process and result in longer delays for you and all other students.

Sometime after the end of June, you will receive the contact information from an individual adviser in the SOUSA Office who will be your resource person until you graduate.

Select your courses: June -September 15

Select your courses for both the Fall and Winter terms using the eCalendar and the class schedule on Minerva. Don't forget to select the Fall or Winter term. 

Keep in mind that the "normal" course load is four or five courses (12-15 credits) per term. We do not recommend that you take more than 15 credits in your first term.

Get your course selections approved: June 1 - mid August

All newly admitted B.Sc. and B.A & Sc. students must complete our on-line course approval form. Please note that you can register before receiving approval, but you must have your selection of courses approved by mid-August.

Register for your courses: June 15 - September 15

Use Minerva to register for the courses your adviser has approved. New students have until August 14 to register for at least one course in order to avoid late registration penalties.

Should you experience any difficulties registering, please call Service Point (514-398-7878), or drop by their office (3415 McTavish St). Also, please refer to Tips on handling registration problems.

When you have registered, don't forget to activate your McGill email account. Please read Welcome to McGill for details. As of the end of course change period, all email from your adviser will be sent only to your McGill email account.

Discover McGill (Orientation): Tuesday, August 25

Attend McGill's day-long, university-wide orientation. It is a day of exciting activities designed to familiarize you with the University. The Faculty of Science runs sessions specifically for new Science and Arts & Science students – refer to the Orientation section in this handbook for details.

Get more advice: August 20 - 28

SOUSA advising for newly admitted students

Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) advisers will be on hand to personally advise newly admitted students about their course selection for the coming year and answer any specific questions or concerns students may have. All new freshman students should attend a freshman program information session prior to meeting with an adviser. 

Freshman program information sessions
B.Sc. info session, to be announced
B.A. & Sc. info session, to be announced

Academic advising

Thursday, August 20th and Friday, August 21st
10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Dawson Hall, Room 405

Monday, August 24th
10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Dawson Hall, Room 405

Tuesday, August 25th
Discover McGill Day - no advising

Wednesday, August 26th - Friday, August 28th
10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Dawson Hall, Room 405
 

Get approval for any course changes you wish to make: August 31 - September 15

10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (weekdays only)

After you have registered you will be able to use Minerva to make changes to your course selection. You can obtain an adviser's approval for your course changes at the SOUSA Office in Dawson Hall, Room 405

Getting advice after the course change period ends

Towards the end of June, you will receive an email from an adviser in the Faculty of Science who will be your resource person until you graduate. Your adviser will send you emails at intervals during your first year. Make sure you read them carefully as they will contain important information.

If you have questions your adviser will be having Same-Day advising sessions (schedule will be posted in September) throughout the academic year. For more serious issues you can arrange an individual appointment with your adviser. Appointments are done by email with your adviser. If you have a simple question, you can email your adviser. When emailing your adviser, please include your name and student number in the subject line and use your McGill email. Be aware during busy periods (like the beginning of term) your email may not be answered in a timely fashion.

Other sources of information

You can obtain information on a broad range of topics from other offices at McGill by following the links below. Their email links are also provided in case you have questions after having read the information.

› Campus Life & Engagement's First-Year Website
› Service Point
› Residences
› Student Services

3.2.2 Selecting courses

As a freshman program student you will be using the web to have your course selection approved by a Faculty adviser and will not be assigned to a departmental program adviser during your first year at McGill. However, you are encouraged to consult departmental advisers about specific academic information pertaining to prerequisites, courses and departmental programs. Their advice will enable you to have a better understanding of the departmental programs you may choose. Students should also refer to the following program-specific advice for their degree:

› B.Sc. program-specific advice
› B.A. & Sc. program-specific advice

Advanced standing

Advanced standing of up to 30 credits may be granted to students who obtain satisfactory results in International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, and Advanced Placement results. If you expect to receive credit and exemption from one or more of the basic science courses, you should not register for those courses, as you will not receive credit twice for the same material. Please consult the admissions information about course equivalences for further details.

Course load

A normal course load is 5 courses each term (total of 10 courses per year) or 30 credits for the year; however, you may wish to start at a slower pace and register for 4 courses in your first term. Because some of the basic science courses are worth four credits, four science freshman courses per term may total 30 credits for the year; consequently, you may wish to take only 4 courses in order to avoid being overloaded. If this is the first time you are studying in English, we strongly recommend that you take only 4 courses during your first term.

Courses administered by faculties outside of Arts and Science

B.Sc. students

You may choose courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science as elective credits, up to a maximum of 6 credits during the freshman year (3 credits per term). Please consult restricted courses outside the Faculty of Science and your Faculty adviser in order to determine which courses are permitted for credit.

B.A. & Sc. students

You may choose courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science as elective credits. Please consult eCalendar section on Courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science and your adviser in order to determine which courses are permitted for credit. These courses may not be used as Arts elective courses.

Constructing a class schedule

When you are selecting your courses, you must make sure that you do not register for courses that overlap in time. There is a 10-minute break between classes to allow you to change rooms and buildings, so you can select courses that are back-to-back without causing problems.

If you plan to register for a multi-term course that spans both the Fall and the Winter terms, such as a language course, make sure that you register in the same section for both terms.

Postponing one of your freshman courses

If it is necessary to postpone one of your freshman courses, depending on your intended program, it may be possible to take the course at McGill during the summer session. Also, it may be helpful to know that you are permitted to take summer courses at another university and have the credits and exemption(s) transferred to your McGill degree. Please consult Study Away for more information regarding study away permission/approval for summer courses and the course equivalency system for more information regarding exemptions from McGill courses.

Biology courses

Biological Sciences

It is recommended that you complete both BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology and BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology in your freshman year. However, the crucial course is BIOL 112, as it is the prerequisite for BIOL 200 Molecular Biology , the core course for all biological science departmental programs. It is strongly recommended that you complete CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1 before attempting BIOL 112. BIOL 111 is a prerequisite for BIOL 206 Meth in Biology of Organisms and BIOL 215 Intro to Ecology and Evolution , core courses in the Biology program. If you plan to pursue the Major Concentration in Biomedical Sciences you do not need to take BIOL 111.

Physical Sciences

If you intend to pursue a departmental program in the physical sciences you do not need to take BIOL 111 or BIOL 112.

Psychology

If you plan to pursue a program in psychology, you should complete BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology and PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology in your freshman year. As our psychology program is quite science oriented, knowledge of the concepts covered in BIOL 112 will help you in subsequent psychology courses.

Chemistry Courses

Biological Sciences

It is recommended that you complete both CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1 and CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2 in your freshman year because these courses are prerequisites for CHEM 212 Intro Organic Chemistry 1 . CHEM 212 is a corequisite for BIOL 200 Molecular Biology , which is a prerequisite for higher level biology courses.

Physical Sciences

If you intend to pursue a departmental program in the physical sciences you must take CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1 and CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2 . These courses are prerequisites for higher level courses in the physical sciences.

Mathematics courses - Calculus

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics currently offers 3 calculus streams, one for students with no previous background in calculus and two for students with a high school background in calculus: the regular stream and the accelerated stream.

MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus (4 cr)
and
MATH 141 Calculus 2 (4 cr)

 
For students with no high school calculus or who do not have a full course of high school calculus (3 hours of lectures and a 2-hour compulsory tutorial).
 
MATH 140 Calculus 1 (3 cr)
and
MATH 141 Calculus 2 (4 cr)
For students with a full course of high school calculus (MATH 140 has 3 hours of lectures and a 1-hour compulsory tutorial; MATH 141 has 3 hours of lectures and a 2-hour compulsory tutorial).
MATH 150 Calculus A (4 cr)
and
MATH 151 Calculus B (4 cr)
For students with a full course of high school calculus and who enjoyed it and did well in all their high school science courses (minimum of A- in high school calculus) (3 hours of lectures and a 2-hour compulsory tutorial).

Both the MATH 139 and 141 and the MATH 140 and 141 streams cover Calculus I and Calculus II, whereas the MATH 150 and 151 stream covers Calculus I, II and III (this stream is a possible option for students planning to enter a program for which Calculus III [MATH 222] is compulsory). The MATH 139 and MATH 141 stream or the MATH 140 and MATH 141 stream are both suitable prerequisites for Calculus III.

Advanced Standing: If you have been granted advanced standing (credit and exemption) for Calculus I or Alpha (either MATH 139 or 140), you have the option of registering for MATH 141 in either the fall or winter term. You may also choose the MATH 150 and 151 stream.

Physics Courses

There are two streams of physics:

PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics
and
PHYS 102 Intro Physics-Electromagnetism
For students with no high school physics or who are weak in physics. This stream is adequate preparation for the biological science programs but not for the physical science programs.
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
and
PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
For students with high school physics and a solid background in mathematics. Note that calculus is required as a corequisite. This stream provides very good preparation for the biological or physical sciences programs.

Physical Sciences

The normal physics requirement for students who intend to pursue a program in the physical sciences is PHYS 131 and PHYS 142; you must complete this requirement in your freshman year. These physics courses require a solid background in high school mathematics and physics.

Biological Sciences

If you intend to pursue a Major Concentration in Biology or a Major Concentration in Biomedical Sciences, you should complete PHYS 101 or 131 and 102 or 142 in your freshman year. Knowledge of these courses will facilitate your understanding of the material in the U1 courses in this program, as well as being prerequisites for future course requirements.

Geography students have the option of completing either stream of physics.

Students with an exemption for PHYS 101 and 102 who intend to follow a physical science program may take PHYS 142 for credit.

Deficient in High School Physics or Mathematics and Intending to Pursue a Program in the Physical Sciences

If you are concerned about your ability to handle PHYS 131 in your first term, you have two choices:

  1. You may initially register in PHYS 101 in your freshman year. At the end of the first term, you may request permission from the Director of Advising Services, Science to register in PHYS 142 in the second term. In order to obtain permission for this change, you should have completed the fall term with strong grades in physics and in your other subjects.
  2. You may prefer to complete PHYS 101 and PHYS 102 during your freshman year. You will then need to consult with your future physical science department to determine whether or not you will be admitted to their program. Their decision will depend on your grades in physics and in your other courses.

Arts introductory courses (B.A. & Sc. students)

In your freshman year, you are required to complete at least three Arts courses chosen from two of the following three categories: Social Sciences, Humanities, and Languages. A maximum of two courses may be selected from one category, and no more than two courses from any one department. These courses are selected from the B.A. & Sc. freshman Program list of approved courses. Courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science are not used towards this requirement.

3.2.3 B.Sc. freshman program requirements

Students normally complete 30 credits which must include at least seven courses from the eCalendar's list of approved freshman Science courses:

Click to see the eCalendar's list of approved freshman Science courses

3.2.3.1 Program-specific advice on choosing freshman Science courses

Students interested in programs in the following areas are advised to select their freshman courses in accordance with the corresponding recommendations.

Anatomy and Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Microbiology & Immunology, Physiology and Pharmacology

BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2

two calculus courses*
two physics courses**
  • For Joint Majors in Physiology and Math or Physiology and Physics, students should select PHYS 131 and 142 instead of PHYS 101 and 102. They should also add MATH 133.
  • students who wish to leave open the option of Biology, Environment, Geography, Earth System Sciences or Earth and Planetary Sciences should also take BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology .
  • students who wish to leave open the option of a physical science such as Atmospheric and Oceanic sciences, Chemistry or Physics should choose the PHYS 131/PHYS 142 stream of physics (see the **Note below).
  • students who wish to leave open the option of a Computer Science major or joint major degree, or who wish a solid introduction to programming, should consider taking COMP 202 in their freshman year.

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
two calculus courses*
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
At least one of:
ATOC 100 Extr-Weath&Climate-Chg Physics
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
ESYS 104 The Earth System
  • students who have not taken all of Biology, Chemistry and Physics at the grade 12 level should include any missing subjects in their freshman program.

Biology

BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology
BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2

two calculus courses*
and
two physics courses**
(both physics courses if planning to take BIOL 306)
  • Note that students interested in the Joint Major Biology and Mathematics, the Joint Major in Computer Science and Biology, or the Biology Major or Honours --Quantitative Biology Option, may need to take PHYS 101 or 131 and PHYS 102 or 142, depending on their choices of stream and complementary courses.

Chemistry

BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
two calculus courses*

Computer Science / Software Engineering

COMP 202 Foundations of Programming
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
two calculus courses*
plus at least 3 of BIOL/CHEM/PHYS**
  • students who do not take COMP 202 in the freshman year may still follow these majors, but might have to start with COMP 202 in the U1 year.
  • students interested in the cognitive science minor may also want to take PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology .
  • students interested in Joint Physics and Computer Science programs must take PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves and PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics .
  • students interested in Joint Major in Computer Science and Biology must take BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology.
  • students with High School calculus and who are interested in the Joint Honours Mathematics and Computer Science program are strongly advised to consider taking the more challenging calculus sequence MATH 150 Calculus A and MATH 151 Calculus B .
  • students who have not taken all of Biology, Chemistry and Physics at the grade 12 level should include any missing subjects in their freshman program.

Earth and Planetary Sciences

CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
ESYS 104 The Earth System
two calculus courses*
  • students are also strongly encouraged to include BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology in their program
  • students who have not taken all of Biology, Chemistry and Physics at the grade 12 level should include any missing subjects in their freshman program.

Earth System Science

BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
two calculus courses*

plus at least 1 of:
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
ESYS 104 The Earth System

Environment

BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
two calculus courses*
two physics courses**
  • students considering the Environmetrics Domain, or who are interested in environmental modeling, should also take MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
  • students considering the Ecological Determinants of Health Domains should also take BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
  • freshman students interested in Environment should take ESYS 104 The Earth System . They are advised NOT to take the ENVR 200-level courses until their U1 year.

Geography

Calculus 1*
Calculus 2*
and/or MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
PHYS 101/131**
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology

at least two of:
ESYS 104 The Earth System
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
PHYS 102/142**
Calculus 2*
and/or MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
  • students with strong science backgrounds should consider enrolling in GEOG 203 Environmental Systems in their first year.

Mathematics and Statistics

MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
two calculus courses*
plus any 4 courses to fulfill the freshman requirements.
  • students with high school calculus and who are intending on taking an Honours programs in Mathematics, a Joint Honours program in Mathematics and another discipline, or an Honours program in Physics are strongly advised to consider taking the more challenging calculus sequence MATH 150 Calculus A and MATH 151 Calculus B .
  • students interested in a joint Mathematics and Computer Science program should include COMP 202 Foundations of Programming in the freshman year.
  • students interested in the joint Physiology and Mathematics programs should include BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology , CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1 , CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2 , and two physics courses** in the freshman year.
  • students interested in a Physics minor should take PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves and PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics in the freshman year.
  • students who have not taken all of Biology, Chemistry and Physics at the grade 12 level should include any missing subjects in their freshman program.

Neuroscience

BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2

two calculus courses*
two physics courses**

MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry (recommended, not required)
  • students interested in Neuroscience should choose a freshman program that leaves some options open as this program has limited enrolment.
  • students with additional space in their schedule might also take PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology, COMP 202 Foundations of Programing and/or MATH 203 Principles of Statistics 1.

Physics

CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
two calculus courses*
  • students who would like to leave their options open for a biological/life sciences major, or who might choose the Joint Physiology and Physics program should choose BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology . BIOL 112 is a prerequisite for PHYS 319 Introduction to Biophysics.
  • students interested in a Joint Physics and Computer Science program, and who do not have a strong background in programming, should consider taking COMP 202 Foundations of Programming in their freshman year.
  • students with high school calculus and who are intending on taking an Honours program in Physics are strongly advised to consider taking the more challenging calculus sequence MATH 150 Calculus A and MATH 151 Calculus B .

Psychology

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology

1st calculus courses*
2nd calculus courses*
and/or MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry

CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
plus at least one more from BIOL/CHEM/PHYS
  • students interested in the cognitive science minor should take COMP 202 Foundations of Programming in their freshman year
  • students who have not taken all of Biology, Chemistry and Physics at the grade 12 level should include any missing subjects in their freshman program.

Leaving open the option to apply for medical school

Students who wish to leave open the option of applying to medical school should be aware that they can select any of the Science majors (not just the biological or life science ones). Medical schools are looking for a diverse applicant pool and all of the Science programs provide ample room to include medical school prerequisite courses (see https://www.mcgill.ca/science/undergraduate/medical). Students perform best when they select a major in which they are interested and engaged. Choosing the appropriate major can also leave many options open, not just medical school.

Students who wish to leave open the option of applying to medical school at the end of the undergraduate studies should review the prerequisite courses required for medical schools at which they may apply to ensure that they complete all of the required basic science courses during their undergraduate degree studies. However, not all such courses need to be completed in the freshman year. Students are encouraged to select the freshman courses that best prepare them for their possible areas of study.

In addition, students should be aware of other constraints on their programs imposed by medical school admissions. For example, some medical schools will not allow courses to be taken under the S/U option, and some medical schools require a full course load. Medical schools vary in their prerequisite requirements but in general it is recommended that interested students complete both one full year of biology and one full year of chemistry during their freshman year. Specific admission requirements for all Canadian medical schools can be found at the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada hompage under Publications.

* Choosing your calculus Courses

  • students with no previous knowledge of Calculus should take MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus , followed by MATH 141 Calculus 2 .
  • students with high school calculus take either the sequence MATH 140 Calculus 1 / MATH 141 Calculus 2 or the sequence MATH 150 Calculus A / MATH 151 Calculus B . The MATH 150/MATH 151 sequence covers the material of (and gives equivalence for) MATH 140, MATH 141 and MATH 222 Calculus 3 and is more challenging than the standard MATH 140/MATH 141 sequence.

** Choosing your physics courses

  • Students who want to take a physical science (Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Chemistry, Earth Systems Science, Earth and Planetary Sciences or Physics) or who want to keep their options open should take the sequence PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves / PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics . Students in the biological sciences can take PHYS 131/PHYS 142, but may prefer to take the sequence PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics / PHYS 102 Intro Physics-Electromagnetism , which covers the same material but assumes less mathematical background.

3.2.3.2 Suggested elective courses for B.Sc. freshman students

Freshman science students may choose electives from the courses listed below, once the required and complementary courses have been selected as part of the B.Sc. freshman program.

Note: Courses that are not being offered in the current year are not listed in Class Schedule on Minerva. Also, you should consult timetable information via Minerva for changes in course offerings or times and for the locations of the courses. Reminder: all courses have limited enrolment.

Math and science courses

Note: Some of the courses listed below are not suitable in the first term as they require university level prerequisites. Please check the Calendar course entries for further information about appropriate background, or the program adviser (from specific departments), before registering.

Note: The courses highlighted below are also listed under the list of approved freshman Science courses for the B.Sc. freshman program.

Note: Science courses numbered 18X (e.g. EPSC 182) are considered general interest courses, and are not part of any program. These courses have no prerequisites.

Note: First Year Seminar courses (CHEM 199, COMP 199, EPSC 199, GEOG 199, PSYT 199) are designed to provide a closer interaction with professors and better working relations with peers than is available in large introductory courses. These seminars endeavour to teach the latest scholarly developments and expose participants to advanced research methods. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum number of students in any seminar is 25, although some are limited to even fewer than that.

Atmospheric & Oceanic Science ESYS 104 The Earth System
ATOC 181 Intro to Atmospheric Science
ATOC 182 Intro to Oceanic Sciences
ATOC 183 Climate and Climate Change
ATOC 184 Science of Storms
ATOC 185 Natural Disasters
Biology BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology
BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
BIOL 200 Molecular Biology
BIOL 201 Cell Biology & Metabolism
BIOL 202 Basic Genetics
BIOL 205 Biology of Organisms
BIOL 206 Meth in Biology of Organisms
BIOL 210 Perspectives of Science
BIOL 240 Monteregian Flora
Chemistry CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
CHEM 180 World of Chem: Environment
CHEM 181 World of Chem: Food
CHEM 182 World of Chem: Technology
CHEM 183 World of Chem: Drugs
CHEM 199 FYS: Why Chemistry?
CHEM 203 Survey of Physical Chemistry
CHEM 204 Physical Chem./Biol.Sci. 1
CHEM 212 Intro Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 214 Physical Chem./Biol. Sci. 2
CHEM 217 General Analytical Chem Lab 1
CHEM 219 Intro to Atmospheric Chemistry
CHEM 222 Intro Organic Chemistry 2
CHEM 223 Intro Phys Chem 1
CHEM 243 Intro Phys Chem 2
CHEM 253 Intro Phys Chem 1 Lab
CHEM 263 course description not available
CHEM 281 Inorganic Chemistry 1
CHEM 287 Intro Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 297 Intro Analytical Chem. Lab.
Computer Science

COMP 102 Computers & Computing
COMP 189 Computers and Society
COMP 199 FYS:Excursions in Computer Sci
COMP 202 Foundations of Programming
COMP 203 course description not available
COMP 206 Intro to Software Systems
COMP 230 Logic and Computability
COMP 250 Intro to Computer Science
COMP 280 Hist and Phil of Computing

Earth & Planetary Sciences ESYS 104 The Earth System
EPSC 180 The Terrestrial Planets
EPSC 181 Environmental Geology
EPSC 182 course description not available
EPSC 185 Natural Disasters
EPSC 199 FYS: Earth & Planetary Explor.
EPSC 201 Understanding Planet Earth
EPSC 233 Earth and Life History
EPSC 334 Invertebrate Paleontology
Geography ESYS 104 The Earth System
GEOG 199 FYS: Geo-Environments
GEOG 201 Intro Geo-Information Science
GEOG 203 Environmental Systems
GEOG 205 Global Chg:Past, Pres & Future
GEOG 221 Environment and Health
GEOG 272 Earth\'s Changing Surface
Mathematics and Statistics MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus
MATH 140 Calculus 1
MATH 141 Calculus 2
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 151 Calculus B
MATH 203 Principles of Statistics 1
MATH 204 Principles of Statistics 2
MATH 222 Calculus 3
MATH 223 Linear Algebra
Physics PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics
PHYS 102 Intro Physics-Electromagnetism
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
PHYS 180 Space, Time & Matter
PHYS 181 Everyday Physics
PHYS 182 Our Evolving Universe
PHYS 183 The Milky Way Inside and Out
PHYS 184 Energy and the Environment
PHYS 224 Physics of Music
PHYS 225 course description not available
Physiology PHGY 199 course description not available
Psychology

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 199 FYS: Mind-Body Medicine
PSYC 204 Intro to Psychological Stats

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 211 Intro Behavioural Neuroscience
PSYC 212 Perception
PSYC 213 Cognition
PSYC 215 Social Psychology
PSYC 305 Statistics for Exper Design

Psychiatry PSYT 199 FYS: Mental Illness&The Brain

Social sciences

Note: If you intend to follow a psychology program, you should not register in SOCI-216 (Social Psychology). PSYC 215 Social Psychology is more appropriate. Credit will not be given for both courses.

Anthropology ANTH 201 Prehistoric Archaeology
ANTH 202 Socio-Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 203 Human Evolution
ANTH 204 Anthropology of Meaning
ANTH 206 Environment and Culture
ANTH 207 Ethnography Through Film
ANTH 208 Evolutionary Anthropology
ANTH 209 Anthropology of Religion
ANTH 212 Anthropology of Development
ANTH 222 Legal Anthropology
ANTH 227 Medical Anthropology
Canadian Studies CANS 200 Understanding Canada (also listed as a Humanities course)
Economics ECON 199 FYS: Aspects of Globalization
ECON 205 An Intro to Political Economy
ECON 208 Microeconomic Analysis&Applic
ECON 209 Macroeconomic Analysis&Applic
ECON 219 Current Econ Problems:Topics
ECON 223 Pol Economy of Trade Policy
ECON 225 Economics of the Environment
Geography GEOG 199 FYS: Geo-Environments (also listed as a Math & Science course)
GEOG 200 Geo Persp:World Env Problems
GEOG 210 Global Places and Peoples
GEOG 216 Geography of the World Economy
GEOG 217 Cities in the Modern World
History HIST 194 FYS: Jewish Concepts of Others
HIST 195 FYS: Sources of World History
HIST 197 FYS: Race in Latin America
HIST 198 FYS:Nation Bldg&Nationalism
HIST 199 FYS: History
HIST 200 Intro to African History
HIST 201 Modern African History
HIST 202 Survey: Canada to 1867
HIST 203 Survey:Canada since 1867
HIST 204 course description not available
HIST 205 Ancient Mediterranean History
HIST 206 Indian Ocean World History
HIST 207 Jewish History:400 BCE to 1000
HIST 208 Intro to East Asian History
HIST 211 American History to 1865
HIST 212 Medieval Europe
HIST 213 World History, 600-2000
HIST 214 Early Modern Europe
HIST 215 Modern Europe
HIST 216 Intro to Russian History
HIST 218 Modern East Asian History
HIST 219 Jewish History: 1000-2000
HIST 221 United States since 1865
HIST 225 course description not available
HIST 226 E Central &SE Europe in 20th C
HIST 236 course description not available
HIST 249 Health&the Healer in West Hist
Linguistics LING 200 Intro to the Study of Language
LING 201 Introduction to Linguistics
Political Science POLI 211 course description not available
POLI 212 Gov\'t&Politics-Developed World
POLI 221 Government of Canada
POLI 222 Political Proc&Behav in Canada
POLI 226 La vie politique québécoise
POLI 227 Developing Areas/Introduction
POLI 231 Intro to Political Theory
POLI 232 Modern Political Thought
POLI 243 Intl Poltcs of Econ Relations
POLI 244 Intl Politics: State Behaviour
 
Sexual Diversity Studies SDST 250 course description not available
Sociology SOCI 210 Sociological Perspectives
SOCI 211 Sociological Inquiry
SOCI 219 Sociology of Culture
SOCI 222 Urban Sociology
SOCI 225 Medicine&Health in Mod Society
SOCI 230 Sociology of Ethnic Relations
SOCI 234 Population & Society
SOCI 235 Technology and Society
SOCI 247 Family & Modern Society
SOCI 250 Social Problems
SOCI 254 Development&Underdevelopment
SOCI 270 Sociology of Gender
Social Studies of Medicine SSMD 199 course description not available
Women Studies WMST 200 course description not available

Humanities

Note: Some of the courses listed below are not suitable for first term as they require university level prerequisites. Please check the Calendar course entries for further information about appropriate background before registering.

Art History ARTH 204 Intro to Medieval Art & Arch
ARTH 205 Introduction to Modern Art
ARTH 207 Intro Early Mod. Art 1400-1700
ARTH 209 Intro to Ancient Art and Arch
ARTH 215 Introduction to East Asian Art
ARTH 223 Intro Ital Renai Art 1300-1500
Canadian Studies CANS 200 Understanding Canada
Catholic Studies CATH 200 Introduction to Catholicism
Classics CLAS 203 Greek Mythology
CLAS 208 course description not available
CLAS 309 course description not available
CLAS 311 course description not available
CLAS 313 course description not available
CLAS 314 course description not available
Communication Studies COMS 200 History of Communication
COMS 210 Intro to Communication Studies
COMS 230 Communication and Democracy
East Asian Studies EAST 211 Intro:East Asian Culture:China
EAST 212 Intro:East Asian Culture:Japan
EAST 213 Intro:East Asian Culture:Korea
EAST 214 course description not available
EAST 215 Introduction to East Asian Art
EAST 216 course description not available
EAST 351 Women Writers of China
EAST 353 Approaches to Chinese Cinema
EAST 354 course description not available
EAST 356 Modern & Contemp. Chinese Art
EAST 362 Japanese Cinema
EAST 363 Early and Medieval Japan
EAST 364 Mass Culture & Postwar Japan
EAST 370 History of Sexuality in Japan
EAST 385 Global Korea
EAST 390 The Chinese Family in History
English ENGL 199 FYS: Literature and Democracy
ENGL 200 Survey of English Literature 1
ENGL 201 Survey of English Lit 2
ENGL 204 English Literature & the Bible
ENGL 215 Intro to Shakespeare
ENGL 225 American Literature 1
ENGL 226 American Literature 2
ENGL 228 Canadian Literature 1
ENGL 229 Canadian Literature 2
ENGL 237 Intro to Study of a Lit Form
ENGL 279 Introduction to Film as Art
ENGL 280 Intro to Film as Mass Medium
French Language & Literature FREN 199 FYS: Littérature française
FREN 250 Litt française avant 1800
FREN 251 Litt française depuis 1800
German Studies GERM 197 FYS: Images of Otherness
GERM 259 Intro to German Literature 1
GERM 260 Intro to German Literature 2
Hispanic Studies HISP 225 Hispanic Civilization 1
HISP 226 Hispanic Civilization 2
HISP 241 Survey of Spanish Lit&Cult 1
HISP 242 Survey of Spanish Lit & Cult 2
HISP 243 Survey of Lat Amer Lit&Cult1
HISP 244 Survey of Lat Amer Lit&Cult2
Italian Studies ITAL 300 course description not available
ITAL 311 course description not available
ITAL 320 course description not available
ITAL 327 course description not available
ITAL 328 course description not available
ITAL 330 course description not available
ITAL 355 Dante and the Middle Ages
ITAL 361 Modern Italian Literature
ITAL 365 The Italian Renaissance
ITAL 374 Classics of Italian Cinema
ITAL 375 Cinema&Society in Modern Italy
Jewish Studies JWST 199 FYS:Images-Jewish Identities
JWST 201 Jewish Law
JWST 206 Intro to Yiddish Literature
JWST 211 Jewish St 1: Biblical Period
JWST 217 Jewish St 3: 1000 to 2000
JWST 225 Literature and Society
JWST 240 The Holocaust
JWST 252 Interdisciplinary Lectures
JWST 254 The Jewish Holy Days
JWST 261 Hist of Jewish Phil & Thought
Music MUAR 201 Basic Materials:Western Mus
MUAR 211 The Art of Listening
MUAR 374 Special Topics in Music
MUAR 384 Romanticism & the Piano
MUAR 387 The Opera
MUAR 389 The Symphony and Concerto
MUAR 392 Popular Music after 1945
MUAR 393 Intro to Jazz
Philosophy PHIL 199 FYS: Minds, Brain and Machines
PHIL 200 Intro to Philosophy 1
PHIL 201 Intro to Philosophy 2
PHIL 210 Intro to Deductive Logic 1
PHIL 220 course description not available
PHIL 221 Intro to Hist & Phil of Sci 2
PHIL 230 Intro to Moral Philosophy 1
PHIL 237 Contemporary Moral Issues
PHIL 240 Political Philosophy 1
PHIL 242 Intro to Feminist Theory
Religious Studies RELG 201 Religions:Ancient Near East
RELG 202 Religion of Ancient Israel
RELG 203 Bible and Western Culture
RELG 204 Judaism, Christianity&Islam
RELG 207 Intro to Study of Religions
RELG 210 Jesus of Nazareth
RELG 232 course description not available
RELG 252 Hinduism & Buddhism
RELG 253 Religions of East Asia
RELG 256 Women in Judaism and Islam
RELG 270 Religious Ethics & the Environ
RELG 271 Religion and Sexuality
Russian & Slavic Studies RUSS 217 Russia\'s Eternal Questions
RUSS 218 Russian Lit and Revolution
RUSS 219 course description not available
RUSS 223 Russian 19c: Literary Giants 1
RUSS 224 Russian 19c. Literary Giants 2
Women Studies WMST 200 course description not available

Languages

Note: No more than one language should be taken at the introductory level during the freshman year. Students with prior knowledge of the language may take higher-level courses with permission from the department.

Classics CLAS 210 Introductory Latin 1
CLAS 212 Introductory Latin 2
CLAS 220D1 course description not available
CLAS 230D1 Introductory Modern Greek
East Asian Studies EAST 220 First Level Korean
EAST 230 First Level Chinese
EAST 240 First Level Japanese
EAST 320 Second Level Korean
EAST 330 Second Level Chinese
EAST 340 Second Level Japanese
English as a Second Language CESL 300 ESL: Academic English 2
CESL 400 ESL: Essay and Critical Thinking
CESL 500 ESL: Research Essay and Rhetoric
French Language & Literature FREN 199 FYS: Littérature française
FREN 201 Le français littéraire (FLS)
FREN 203 Analyse de textes (FLS)
FREN 231 Linguistique française
FREN 239 Stylistique comparée
FREN 245 Grammaire normative
French as a Second Language FRSL 101 Beginners French 1
FRSL 105 Intensive Beginners French
FRSL 206 Elementary French
FRSL 207 Elementary French 01
FRSL 208 Intensive Elementary French
FRSL 211 Oral and Written French 1
FRSL 212 Oral & Written French 1
FRSL 215 Oral&Writ French 1-Intensive
FRSL 216 Découvrons Mtl en français
German Studies GERM 200 German Lang Intens Beginners
GERM 202 German Language, Beginners
Hispanic Studies HISP 202D1 course description not available
HISP 204D1 course description not available
HISP 210 Spanish Language:Beginners
HISP 218 Spanish Lang Intens-Elem
HISP 219 Spanish Lang Intens-Intermed
HISP 220D1 Spanish Language:Intermediate
Islamic Studies ISLA 521D1 Introductory Arabic
ISLA 522 Lower Intermediate Arabic
ISLA 532D1 Introductory Turkish
ISLA 533D1 Lower Intermediate Turkish
ISLA 541D1 Introductory Persian
ISLA 542D1 Lower Intermediate Persian
ISLA 551D1 Introductory Urdu-Hindi
ISLA 552D1 Intermediate Urdu-Hindi
Italian Studies ITAL 205D1 Italian for Beginners
ITAL 206 Beginners Italian Intensive
ITAL 210D1 Italian for Adv. Beginners
ITAL 215D1 Intermediate Italian
ITAL 216 Intermediate Italian Intensive
Jewish Studies JWST 200 course description not available
JWST 220 Introductory Hebrew
JWST 280 course description not available
Religious Studies RELG 257D1 Introductory Sanskrit
RELG 264 Introductory Tibetan 1
RELG 265 Introductory Tibetan 2
RELG 280 New Testament Greek 2
Russian & Slavic Studies RUSS 210 Elementary Russian Language 1
RUSS 211 Elementary Russian Language 2
RUSS 215 Elem Russian Lang Intensive 1
RUSS 255D1 course description not available

3.2.4 B.A. & Sc. freshman program requirements

The B.A. & Sc. freshman program provides a reasonably broad background in basic sciences and enables you to explore some disciplines in Arts. Before registering, be sure to reflect on your own academic orientation, so that your choice of courses in your first year will prepare you for departmental programs in Arts and in Science that interest you.

Some of the programs in this degree require additional or specific freshman courses as prerequisites. See this program-specific advice below.

NOTE: The B.A. & Sc. freshman program consists of a Science component (two math and three science courses) and an Arts component (three Arts courses). Courses taken for the freshman program cannot also be counted in any other program. There is no double counting of courses in the B.A. & Sc. degree.

Click to see the eCalendar's list of approved Arts & Science freshman courses

Bachelor of Arts and Science (B.A. & Sc.) - Freshman Program(30 Credits)

    Offered by:Arts & Science Admin (Shared)
    Degree:Bachelor of Arts and Science

Program Requirement:

Students who need to complete 97-120 credits to fulfil their degree requirements are admitted to the Freshman Program. Students with specific career goals should consult an academic adviser about their choice of program within the B.A. & Sc. However, students intending to pursue further studies following the B.A. & Sc. should refer to the admissions requirements of particular programs for the appropriate prerequisite courses.

MATH

At least two mathematics courses:

At most one of a First Calculus:


  • MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus 4 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • MATH 140 Calculus 1 3 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • MATH 150 Calculus A 4 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer


At most one of a Second Calculus:


  • MATH 141 Calculus 2 4 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • MATH 151 Calculus B 4 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer


At most one of a Linear Algebra course:


  • MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry 3 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • MATH 134 Enriched Linear Algebra&Geom 3 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer


SCIENCE

At least three foundational science courses:

Any number of:


  • BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology 3 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology 3 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1 4 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2 4 Credits*
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

* Note: CHEM 120 is not open to students who have taken CHEM 115.


At most one of a First Physics:


  • PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics 4 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves 4 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer


At most one of a Second Physics:

Note: PHYS 101 is a prerequisite for PHYS 102; and PHYS 131 is a prerequisite for PHYS 142.


  • PHYS 102 Intro Physics-Electromagnetism 4 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics 4 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer


At most two of another Foundational Science:


  • COMP 202 Foundations of Programming 3 Credits*
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • ESYS 104 The Earth System 3 Credits
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

  • PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 Credits*
      Offered in the:
    • Fall
    • Winter
    • Summer

* Note: Students in a minor or major concentration where COMP 202 or PSYC 100 is a required course will need to take an alternative COMP or PSYC course if using COMP 202 or PSYC 100 to satisfy the Freshman Program requirement.


Note: All courses in PSYC, COMP, GEOG and MATH are considered science courses.

Depending on your academic orientation, you will pursue one of the departmental programs listed below in science. The recommended course selection for the U0 year for each of these programs appears below. If you follow these recommendations you will have all the prerequisites you need to enter your departmental program in your U1 year.


These Arts courses must be selected as described at the top of this page. There are no specific prerequisites for entry into any of the departmental programs in Arts.

3.2.4.1 Program-specific advice on choosing B.A. & Sc. freshman courses

Biology

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology
BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 141 Calculus 2 or
MATH 151 Calculus B or
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
Arts Course
Arts Course
 
Arts Course

Please note that PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics and PHYS 102 Intro Physics-Electromagnetism are prerequisites for some of the 200 and 300-level Biology courses. See the Course Catalog for details.

Notes: The maximum number of courses per term is five.

Chemistry

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 141 Calculus 2 or
MATH 151 Calculus B
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2
PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics or
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
Arts Course
Arts Course
 
Arts Course

Notes:

The maximum number of courses per term is five.

It is recommended that you take MATH 139/140/150, MATH 141/151 and MATH 133 because they are all prerequisites for the U1 courses in Chemistry.

Cognitive Science

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 141 Calculus 2 or
MATH 151 Calculus B
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
Foundational science Foundational Science
Arts course Arts course
Arts course  

Notes:

The maximum number of courses per term is five.

If you are interested in the Computer Science stream, you should take MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry and COMP 202 Foundations of Programming .

If you are interested in the Linguistics stream, you should take LING 201 Introduction to Linguistics .

If you are interested in the Neuroscience stream, you should take CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1, CHEM 120 General Chemistry 2, PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics, and PHYS 102 Intro Physics-Electromagnetism. These would be in place of the Arts courses indicated above; you would complete your freshman Arts requirement in subsequent years.

NOTE:  No course can count for more than one program, whether that is the freshman, interfaculty or minor program.

Students interested in Cognitive Science should contact ryan.bouma [at] mcgill.ca (Ryan Bouma), the Program Adviser.

Computer Science

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 141 Calculus 2 or
MATH 151 Calculus B
Foundational Science
Foundational Science
Foundational Science
Arts Course
Arts Course
Arts Course
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
 

Notes:

The maximum number of courses per term is five.

It is recommended that you take all three Math courses: MATH 139/140/150, MATH 141/151, and MATH 133 in your freshman year because they are prerequisites for U1 courses in Computer. COMP 202 can be taken in U1. If you have advanced standing credits and/or exemptions for the B.A. & Sc. freshman Program requirements you can take COMP 202 Foundations of Programming in your freshman year.

Earth, Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 141 Calculus 2 or
MATH 151 Calculus B
PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics or
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 102 Intro Physics-Electromagnetism or
PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1 Arts Course
Arts Course Arts Course

Notes:

The maximum number of courses per term is five.

Students should follow the PHYS 131, 142 stream of Physics.

If you have advanced standing and/or exemptions for some of the B.A. & Sc. freshman Program requirements, we recommend that you take ESYS 104 The Earth System during your freshman year.

Environment

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 141 Calculus 2 or
MATH 151 Calculus B or
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics or
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
Arts Course
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1 Arts Course
BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology Arts Course

Notes:

The maximum number of courses per term is five.

If you have advanced standing and/or exemptions for some of the B.A. & Sc. freshman Program requirements, it is recommended that you take ESYS 104 The Earth System in your freshman year. Also, we recommend that you take BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology if you are planning to take higher level Biology courses.

Geography

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
PHYS 101 Intro Physics - Mechanics or
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves
Arts Course
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1 Arts Course
BIOL 111 Principles:Organismal Biology Arts Course

Notes:

The maximum number of courses per term is five.

If you have advanced standing and/or exemptions for some of the B.A. & Sc. freshman Program requirements we recommend that you take GEOG 272 Earth\'s Changing Surface during your freshman year.

Mathematics

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 141 Calculus 2 or
MATH 151 Calculus B
Foundational Science MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
Foundational Science Foundational Science
Arts Course Arts Course
  Arts Course

Notes:

The maximum number of courses per term is five.

You should take the three Math courses listed above as they are prerequisites for U1 courses offered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

Physics

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 141 Calculus 2 or
MATH 151 Calculus B
PHYS 131 Mechanics and Waves PHYS 142 Electromagnetism & Optics
Foundational Science MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
Arts Course Arts Course
  Arts Course

Notes:

The maximum number of courses per term is five.

It is recommended that you take the three Math courses listed above as they are prerequisites for U1 courses in Physics.

Psychology

In your freshman year, you should take the following courses:

Fall Term
Winter Term
MATH 139 Calculus 1 with Precalculus or
MATH 140 Calculus 1 or
MATH 150 Calculus A
MATH 141 Calculus 2 or
MATH 151 Calculus B or
MATH 133 Linear Algebra and Geometry
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology
CHEM 110 General Chemistry 1 Foundational Science
Arts Course Arts Course
Arts Course  

Notes:

The maximum number of courses per term is five.

3.2.4.2 Approved Arts courses for B.A. & Sc. freshman students

As a freshman B.A. & Sc. student, you may select your Arts courses from those listed below. These are suggestions only.

Note: Courses not being offered are grayed-out in the on-line Calendar, and they do not appear in Class Schedule on Minerva. You should consult timetable information via Minerva for changes in course offerings or times and for the locations of the courses. Reminder: all courses have limited enrolment.

Social Sciences

Note: If you intend to follow a psychology program, you should not register in SOCI-216 (Social Psychology). PSYC-215 (Social Psychology) is more appropriate. Credit will not be given for both courses.

Anthropology ANTH 201 Prehistoric Archaeology
ANTH 202 Socio-Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 203 Human Evolution
ANTH 204 Anthropology of Meaning
ANTH 205 course description not available
ANTH 206 Environment and Culture
ANTH 207 Ethnography Through Film
ANTH 208 Evolutionary Anthropology
ANTH 209 Anthropology of Religion
ANTH 212 Anthropology of Development
ANTH 222 Legal Anthropology
ANTH 227 Medical Anthropology
Economics ECON 199 FYS: Aspects of Globalization
ECON 205 An Intro to Political Economy
ECON 208 Microeconomic Analysis&Applic
ECON 209 Macroeconomic Analysis&Applic
ECON 219 Current Econ Problems:Topics
ECON 223 Pol Economy of Trade Policy
ECON 225 Economics of the Environment
History HIST 194 FYS: Jewish Concepts of Others
HIST 195 FYS: Sources of World History
HIST 197 FYS: Race in Latin America
HIST 198 FYS:Nation Bldg&Nationalism
HIST 199 FYS: History
HIST 200 Intro to African History
HIST 201 Modern African History
HIST 202 Survey: Canada to 1867
HIST 203 Survey:Canada since 1867
HIST 204 course description not available
HIST 205 Ancient Mediterranean History
HIST 206 Indian Ocean World History
HIST 207 Jewish History:400 BCE to 1000
HIST 208 Intro to East Asian History
HIST 211 American History to 1865
HIST 212 Medieval Europe
HIST 213 World History, 600-2000
HIST 214 Early Modern Europe
HIST 215 Modern Europe
HIST 216 Intro to Russian History
HIST 218 Modern East Asian History
HIST 219 Jewish History: 1000-2000
HIST 221 United States since 1865
HIST 225 course description not available
HIST 226 E Central &SE Europe in 20th C
HIST 236 course description not available
HIST 249 Health&the Healer in West Hist
Linguistics LING 200 Intro to the Study of Language
LING 201 Introduction to Linguistics
Political Science POLI 211 course description not available
POLI 212 Gov\'t&Politics-Developed World
POLI 221 Government of Canada
POLI 222 Political Proc&Behav in Canada
POLI 226 La vie politique québécoise
POLI 227 Developing Areas/Introduction
POLI 231 Intro to Political Theory
POLI 232 Modern Political Thought
POLI 243 Intl Poltcs of Econ Relations
POLI 244 Intl Politics: State Behaviour
Sociology SOCI 210 Sociological Perspectives
SOCI 211 Sociological Inquiry
SOCI 219 Sociology of Culture
SOCI 222 Urban Sociology
SOCI 225 Medicine&Health in Mod Society
SOCI 230 Sociology of Ethnic Relations
SOCI 234 Population & Society
SOCI 235 Technology and Society
SOCI 247 Family & Modern Society
SOCI 250 Social Problems
SOCI 254 Development&Underdevelopment
SOCI 270 Sociology of Gender

Humanities (Literature and Civilization)

Note: Some of the courses listed below are not suitable for first term as they require university level prerequisites. Please check the Calendar course entries for further information about appropriate background before registering.

Art History ARTH 204 Intro to Medieval Art & Arch
ARTH 205 Introduction to Modern Art
ARTH 207 Intro Early Mod. Art 1400-1700
ARTH 209 Intro to Ancient Art and Arch
ARTH 215 Introduction to East Asian Art
ARTH 223 Intro Ital Renai Art 1300-1500
Classics CLAS 203 Greek Mythology
CLAS 208 course description not available
CLAS 309 course description not available
CLAS 311 course description not available
CLAS 313 course description not available
CLAS 314 course description not available
East Asian Studies EAST 211 Intro:East Asian Culture:China
EAST 212 Intro:East Asian Culture:Japan
EAST 213 Intro:East Asian Culture:Korea
EAST 214 course description not available
EAST 215 Introduction to East Asian Art
EAST 216 course description not available
EAST 351 Women Writers of China
EAST 353 Approaches to Chinese Cinema
EAST 354 course description not available
EAST 356 Modern & Contemp. Chinese Art
EAST 362 Japanese Cinema
EAST 363 Early and Medieval Japan
EAST 364 Mass Culture & Postwar Japan
EAST 370 History of Sexuality in Japan
EAST 385 Global Korea
EAST 390 The Chinese Family in History
English ENGL 199 FYS: Literature and Democracy
ENGL 200 Survey of English Literature 1
ENGL 201 Survey of English Lit 2
ENGL 204 English Literature & the Bible
ENGL 215 Intro to Shakespeare
ENGL 225 American Literature 1
ENGL 226 American Literature 2
ENGL 228 Canadian Literature 1
ENGL 229 Canadian Literature 2
ENGL 237 Intro to Study of a Lit Form
ENGL 279 Introduction to Film as Art
ENGL 280 Intro to Film as Mass Medium
French Language & Literature FREN 199 FYS: Littérature française
FREN 250 Litt française avant 1800
FREN 251 Litt française depuis 1800
German Studies GERM 197 FYS: Images of Otherness
GERM 259 Intro to German Literature 1
GERM 260 Intro to German Literature 2
Hispanic Studies HISP 225 Hispanic Civilization 1
HISP 226 Hispanic Civilization 2
HISP 241 Survey of Spanish Lit&Cult 1
HISP 242 Survey of Spanish Lit & Cult 2
HISP 243 Survey of Lat Amer Lit&Cult1
HISP 244 Survey of Lat Amer Lit&Cult2
Italian Studies ITAL 199 FYS:Italy\'s Lit in Context
ITAL 300 course description not available
ITAL 311 course description not available
ITAL 320 course description not available
ITAL 327 course description not available
ITAL 328 course description not available
ITAL 330 course description not available
ITAL 355 Dante and the Middle Ages
ITAL 361 Modern Italian Literature
ITAL 365 The Italian Renaissance
ITAL 374 Classics of Italian Cinema
ITAL 375 Cinema&Society in Modern Italy
Jewish Studies JWST 199 FYS:Images-Jewish Identities
JWST 201 Jewish Law
JWST 206 Intro to Yiddish Literature
JWST 211 Jewish St 1: Biblical Period
JWST 217 Jewish St 3: 1000 to 2000
JWST 225 Literature and Society
JWST 240 The Holocaust
JWST 252 Interdisciplinary Lectures
JWST 254 The Jewish Holy Days
JWST 261 Hist of Jewish Phil & Thought
Philosophy PHIL 200 Intro to Philosophy 1
PHIL 201 Intro to Philosophy 2
PHIL 210 Intro to Deductive Logic 1
PHIL 220 course description not available
PHIL 221 Intro to Hist & Phil of Sci 2
PHIL 230 Intro to Moral Philosophy 1
PHIL 237 Contemporary Moral Issues
PHIL 240 Political Philosophy 1
PHIL 242 Intro to Feminist Theory
Religious Studies RELG 201 Religions:Ancient Near East
RELG 202 Religion of Ancient Israel
RELG 203 Bible and Western Culture
RELG 204 Judaism, Christianity&Islam
RELG 207 Intro to Study of Religions
RELG 210 Jesus of Nazareth
RELG 232 course description not available
RELG 252 Hinduism & Buddhism
RELG 253 Religions of East Asia
RELG 256 Women in Judaism and Islam
RELG 270 Religious Ethics & the Environ
RELG 271 Religion and Sexuality
Russian & Slavic Studies RUSS 217 Russia\'s Eternal Questions
RUSS 218 Russian Lit and Revolution
RUSS 219 course description not available
RUSS 223 Russian 19c: Literary Giants 1
RUSS 224 Russian 19c. Literary Giants 2
Women Studies WMST 200 course description not available

Languages

Note: In this category you may take courses to acquire or to improve your language skills. A placement test may be necessary and approval from the department may be required.

Classics CLAS 210 Introductory Latin 1
CLAS 212 Introductory Latin 2
CLAS 220D1 course description not available
CLAS 230D1 Introductory Modern Greek
East Asian Studies EAST 220D1 First Level Korean
EAST 230D1 First Level Chinese
EAST 240D1 First Level Japanese
EAST 320 Second Level Korean
EAST 330 Second Level Chinese
EAST 340 Second Level Japanese
English as a Second Language ESLN 200 course description not available
ESLN 300 course description not available
ESLN 400 course description not available
ESLN 500 course description not available
French Language & Literature FREN 199 FYS: Littérature française
FREN 201 Le français littéraire (FLS)
FREN 203 Analyse de textes (FLS)
FREN 231 Linguistique française
FREN 239 Stylistique comparée
FREN 245 Grammaire normative
French as a Second Language FRSL 101D1 course description not available
FRSL 105 Intensive Beginners French
FRSL 206 Elementary French
FRSL 207D1 Elementary French 01
FRSL 208 Intensive Elementary French
FRSL 211D1 Oral and Written French 1
FRSL 212 Oral & Written French 1
FRSL 215 Oral&Writ French 1-Intensive
FRSL 216 Découvrons Mtl en français
German Studies GERM 200 German Lang Intens Beginners
GERM 202D1 German Language, Beginners
Hispanic Studies HISP 202D1 course description not available
HISP 204D1 course description not available
HISP 210D1 Spanish Language:Beginners
HISP 218 Spanish Lang Intens-Elem
HISP 219 Spanish Lang Intens-Intermed
HISP 220D1 Spanish Language:Intermediate
Islamic Studies ISLA 521D1 Introductory Arabic
ISLA 522D1 Lower Intermediate Arabic
ISLA 532D1 Introductory Turkish
ISLA 533D1 Lower Intermediate Turkish
ISLA 541D1 Introductory Persian
ISLA 542D1 Lower Intermediate Persian
ISLA 551D1 Introductory Urdu-Hindi
ISLA 552D1 Intermediate Urdu-Hindi
Italian Studies ITAL 205D1 Italian for Beginners
ITAL 206 Beginners Italian Intensive
ITAL 210D1 Italian for Adv. Beginners
ITAL 215D1 Intermediate Italian
ITAL 216 Intermediate Italian Intensive
Jewish Studies JWST 200 course description not available
JWST 220D1 Introductory Hebrew
JWST 280D1 course description not available
Religious Studies RELG 257D1 Introductory Sanskrit
RELG 264 Introductory Tibetan 1
RELG 265 Introductory Tibetan 2
RELG 280D1 course description not available
Russian & Slavic Studies RUSS 210 Elementary Russian Language 1
RUSS 211 Elementary Russian Language 2
RUSS 215 Elem Russian Lang Intensive 1
RUSS 255D1 course description not available

3.2.5 Registering for freshman courses

Since Science and Arts & Science freshman students begin registering later than students from several other faculties, we usually restrict access to our freshman science courses for part of the summer, and open them to everyone once our students have had a chance to register. This is to ensure that students who need these courses have equal access to places in the courses.

NOTE the dates below only affect when the courses are available for registration. They do not change the opening dates of registration for new students. These are listed in Important Dates, and are different for various admission pools.

Here is the plan for 2020:

For non-lab freshman courses
MATH 133, MATH 134, MATH 139, MATH 140, MATH 141:

June 1 to June 25

Open to students in selected degrees:

  • BSc
  • BA&Sc
  • BEd
  • BSc (Kinesiology)
  • BSc (Nursing)
  • BEng
  • BSE (Software Engineering)
  • BSc (Architecture)
  • BA (Arts);

Closed to all other students

June 26 by 10:00 a.m. Open to all students

For freshman courses with labs
BIOL 111, BIOL 112, CHEM 110, CHEM 120, PHYS 101, PHYS 102, PHYS 131, PHYS 142:

June 1 to July 9

Open to students in selected degrees:

  • BSc
  • BA&Sc
  • BEd
  • BSc (Kinesiology)
  • BSc (Nursing)
  • BEng
  • BSE (Software Engineering)
  • BSc (Architecture);

Closed to all other students

July 10 by 10:00 a.m. Open to all students

3.3 First year for students exempt from the freshman program (U1)

If you were admitted with 24 or more advanced standing credits but did not receive a Quebec CEGEP DEC, you should complete a course approval form (available in early June) as you may still have outstanding freshman requirements. These requirements must be completed. Completing the form will allow one of our advisers to confirm your requirements for you.

3.3.1 Getting started on your degree

The steps you need to follow to select your courses, get academic advice and register are set out below. Please read this information carefully. The dates provided here are a guide only; for exact dates and deadlines, visit mcgill.ca/importantdates.

Inform yourself: June 1 - August 31st

Read all our information on the B.Sc. program types or B.A. & Sc. program types.

Find out if you are eligible for advanced standing

Newly admitted students may receive advanced standing for university study completed elsewhere, or in another faculty at McGill, or for results in International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, Advanced Placement tests or the Diploma in Collegial Studies.

Note that if you receive 24 or more advanced standing credits, you will be classified as a U1 student. However, depending on which courses you have been granted exemptions for, you may still have outstanding freshman program requirements. These must be completed. If you are not sure if you have met the freshman requirements, you can fill out a course approval form available as of June 1st. This will allow an adviser to review your exemptions and reply to you.

It is essential that you know if you will be granted credit and course exemption for work completed elsewhere as you will not be given additional credit towards your degree for any McGill course where the content overlaps substantially with any other course for which you have already received credit, such as for advanced standing results.

For information about advanced standing credits as a result of the tests mentioned above, please refer to the following: advanced standing and Science placement exams.

If you have completed university study elsewhere (other than freshman requirements), you need to get the courses evaluated for course equivalency system. If you need assistance you can contact Mary Gauthier at mary.gauthier [at] mcgill.ca.

As program academic advisers may not available until August, please register for courses that you consider appropriate, and then adjust your registration once your course equivalences have been determined.

Get advice: June 1 - September 15

B.Sc. and B.A. & Sc. students have access to two types of academic adviser.

1. Program advisers

Each department in the Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Arts provides advisers who are very familiar with the requirements of their Honours, Major, B.Sc. Liberal and Minor programs. These advisers will be available for consultation at the end of August. Some departments may have advisers available earlier. Check with the department.

2. SOUSA advisers

From the beginning of June until the end of the drop/add period in September, the team of academic advisers in the SOUSA Office in the Faculty of Science will be available in a variety of ways (see below) to provide you with general information and answer your questions. We provide service all year, but our schedule may change periodically.

If, after reading the information in the eCalendar and on our website, you need clarification or you have questions of an advising nature, contact us by newstudentadvising.science [at] mcgill.ca (email) at newstudentadvising.science [at] mcgill.ca. When emailing the advisers, please include your name and student number in the subject line. Please allow at least seven business days for the advisers to respond to your questions. You will receive a response. Please do not send your questions to other people in the university as this will slow the advising process and result in longer delays for you and all other students.

Sometime over the Summer, you will receive the contact information for an individual adviser in the SOUSA Office who will be your resource person until you graduate.

Select your program and courses: June 1 - August 31

To complete the B.A. & Sc. or B.Sc. degree you will have to do all the requirements for departmental programs as described in the McGill eCalendar. After you have chosen your departmental program(s), select your courses for both the Fall and Winter terms using the eCalendar and the class schedule on Minerva. Don't forget to select the Fall or Winter term.

If you have difficulty choosing a departmental program, email the advisers at the address provided above.

Keep in mind that the "normal" course load is four or five courses (12-15 credits) per term. We do not recommend that you take more than 15 credits in your first term.

Register
Program registration: June 8 - September 15
Course registration for students from CEGEP: June 8 - Sept 15
Course registration for all other students: June 15 - Sept 15

Use Minerva to register for the program or programs that you have chosen. These can be changed on Minerva later on if you change your mind about which program(s) you wish to complete. New students have until August 14th to register for at least one course in order to avoid late registration penalties.

Once you have registered for your programs, you may then register for your courses.

Should you experience any difficulties registering, please call Service Point (514-398-7878), or drop by their office (3415 McTavish St.). Also, please refer to Tips on handling registration problems.

When you have registered, don't forget to activate your McGill email account. See the Welcome Book for details. At the end of the course change period all email from your adviser will be sent only to your McGill email account.

Discover McGill (University Orientation): Tuesday, August 25

Attend McGill's day-long, university-wide orientation. It is a day of exciting activities designed to help you familiarize yourself with the University. The Faculty of Science runs sessions specifically for new Science and Arts & Science students – refer to the Orientation section in this handbook for details.

For B.A. & Sc. students, you must choose the Science schedule of events.

Attend a departmental orientation: August 24 and August 26

Attend an orientation session(s) (list will be available in early June) offered by the department(s) in which you intend to major. You should be able to schedule a meeting with a program adviser at these sessions.

Faculty of Science advising sessions: August 22 - August 28

SOUSA advising for newly admitted students
Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising (SOUSA) advisers will be on hand to personally advise newly admitted students about their course selection for the coming year and answer any specific questions or concerns students may have.

Thursday, August 20th and Friday, August 21st
10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Dawson Hall, 4th Floor, Room 405

Monday, August 24th
10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Dawson Hall, Room 405

Tuesday, August 25th
Discover McGill Day - no advising

Wednesday, August 27th to Friday, August 28th
10:00 a.m. to 3:30
Dawson Hall, Room 405

Get approval for any course changes you wish to make: August 31st to September 15

Faculty Advising: Dawson Hall room 405
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (weekdays only)

Discuss course changes with your departmental program adviser(s) who will approve them if appropriate. Use Minerva to make the changes to your record.

Getting advice after the course change period ends

If you have questions about your departmental program, consult with your adviser in the department that administers the program.

You will also be receiving an email (in early July) from an adviser in the Faculty of Science who will be your resource person until you graduate. Your adviser will send you emails at intervals during the first year. Make sure you read them carefully as they will contain important information.

If you have questions your Faculty adviser will be having Same-Day advising sessions (schedule will be posted in September) throughout the academic year. For more serious issues you can arrange an individual appointment with your adviser. Come to Room 405 on the 4th floor of Dawson Hall or call (514) 398-5442 and arrange an advising appointment. If you have a simple question, you can email your adviser. When emailing your adviser, please include your name and student number in the message.

Other sources of information

You can obtain information on a broad range of topics from other offices at McGill by following the links below. Their email links are also provided in case you have questions after having read the information. Be aware during busy periods (like the beginning of term) your email may not be answered in a timely fashion.

› Campus Life & Engagement's First-Year Website
› Enrolment Services
› Residences
› Student Services

3.3.2 Selecting a program

Students selecting a program should choose an area that fits their general academic interests and background. The Bachelor's degree is intended to serve as a general preliminary step in the pursuit of major career goals. Students in the Bachelor of Science degree may, in addition to their first program, choose from a large number of Minor and Minor Concentrations approved by the Faculty of Science. Undecided students should consider their basic strengths and weaknesses when considering the following:

  • preferred subjects
  • the departmental programs which include them
  • whether they have previously completed courses in these disciplines
  • programs which contain more than one of these subjects
  • whether one program stands out above all others
  • whether an Honours or a Liberal program is a viable option
  • whether there is room for electives
  • whether programs are related to vocational or personal interests
  • academic and career goals and whether there are certain academic prerequisites that must be completed to pursue them
  • the intention to develop certain skills (analytical reasoning, writing, verbal communication, teamwork, independent work, laboratory research, computer skills, etc.)
  • program requirements which may focus on weak points (e.g.: a Science student considering a program requiring chemistry if previous grades in this area have not been strong; programs with language requirements, etc.; program requiring statistics if a student is not strong in math)

In selecting their program combination's, students should think about the following:

  • balancing programs that have breadth with those that have depth. Programs with breadth include those that are cross-disciplinary such as the Science Major Concentration in Earth, Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences or the Arts Major Concentration in International Development Studies. These programs provide an opportunity to study a wide variety of subjects and can potentially provide context for your depth studies. Broad programs do however generally include a smaller proportion of upper level courses (400 and 500 level courses) than programs with more depth, and therefore programs that provide depth and include upper level courses are of particular importance to students who would like to continue their studies at the graduate level as these courses provide more in-depth exposure to important issues in a discipline. To ensure appropriate depth, students in the Multi-Track option are advised to choose at least one focused major concentration.
  • combining programs that either complement each other or offer a strong contrast. For example, the Science Major Concentration in Earth, Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences might be combined with the Arts Major Concentration in Geography to provide a science and a social science perspective on the study of the earth. Another pairing of this type could be Biology & Anthropology. Even with the Interfaculty program one could choose a complementary minor. For example, the Environment Interfaculty program could be combined with a minor in Political Science for better scientific understating of future policies. An Arts Major Concentration in Economics might be combined with a Science Major Concentration in Mathematics to provide good preparation for work, or further study in Finance. Also, the Science Major Concentration in Physics might be combined with an Arts Minor Concentration in Philosophy and a Minor Concentration in Linguistics simply because a student's academic interests are diverse.
  • selecting programs that lead toward future goals. For example, the Interfaculty program in Environment might be combined with a Minor Concentration in Hispanic Studies because a student wants to work for an organization with an Environmental focus in Latin America after graduation. A student who was interested in working areas of political science where policy-makers are faced with decisions related to science may consider combining an Arts Major Concentration in International Development Studies, with a Science Major Concentration in Biology, or Earth, Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences.

It is important that students become familiar with the academic regulations of the Faculties of Arts and of Science. An intended course plan may not be feasible if it requires the completion of too many credits from other faculties, or if it is not listed in the calendar.

Students who are still unsure about their program choice may discuss degree planning ideas with:

These resources may also be considered:

Once program adviser(s) have been consulted, students must select courses according to departmental requirements. It is important to refer to the McGill Academic eCalendar as well as individual departmental handbooks available on the Web and/or through the departments themselves.

Most courses chosen in the first year at McGill will be at the 200 level, with the exception of language courses, where the appropriate level will be determined by a placement test administered by the department offering the course. The first digit of the course number normally denotes the course level.

When registering for courses, it is the student's responsibility to ensure that all prerequisites have been met.

3.3.3 Bachelor of Science program types

Students who need 96 or fewer credits to complete their B.Sc. degree requirements (3-year degree) must select one of the following degree programs at the time of registration: Liberal, Major, or Honours. These programs must be selected from within the Science program group to which you have been admitted. For detailed descriptions of these types of programs, please consult the Science section of the McGill eCalendar, or the Science department websites.

  • The B.Sc. Liberal program provides students with the opportunity to study the core of one science discipline along with a breadth component from another area of science or from many other disciplines.

    Students complete a Core Science component (CSC), plus a Breadth component. The requirements of the Core Science components are given in the departmental sections of the eCalendar. For the Breadth component, students must complete a Science Minor program, an Arts Minor or Major Concentration available for Science students, or a Core Science component in a second area.

    Note that you while your first Core Science Component must be taken within the Science program group that you were admitted to, you can take a Minor or a second Liberal CSC from another group. If you are doing the B.Sc. Liberal, you won't be able to declare a second CSC from outside of your own group using MINERVA, so if you wish to do this, please email your academic adviser with the request, and he or she will arrange to have your record updated accordingly.

  • Major programs are more specialized than Faculty or Liberal programs and are usually centered on a specific discipline or department.
  • Honours programs typically involve an even higher degree of specialization, often include supervised research, and require students to maintain a high academic standard. Although Honours programs are specially designed to prepare students for graduate studies, graduates of other degree programs are also normally admissible to most graduate schools. Students who intend to pursue graduate students in their discipline should consult a departmental adviser regarding the appropriate selection of courses in their field.

    The following Honours programs are available to students in their first year of studies: Computer Science, Applied Mathematics, Mathematics and Statistics, Mathematics and Computer Science, Mathematics and Physics, Physics, Physics and Chemistry. As the first-year courses in these Honours programs differ from the first-year courses in the department's Major program, students are strongly encouraged to begin one of the these Honours programs in their first year.

    The following Honours programs are open to students in their first, second, or third year of studies: Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Planetary Sciences. The first-year courses in these Honours programs are the same as the first-year courses in the department's Major program.

    The following Honours programs are only open to students in their second or third year: Anatomy and Cell Biology, Atmospheric Science, Biochemistry, Biology, Environment, Geography, Immunology, Microbiology and Immunology, Physiology, Psychology.

    Students interested in registering for an Honours program must have prior departmental approval.

  • Minor programs may be selected in addition to a Major or Honours program, or as part of the Liberal program. These are coherent sequences of courses in a given discipline or interdisciplinary area. Students are not normally given permission to start a minor in their last year. Students wishing to do so should consult with a faculty adviser in the Science Office for Undergraduate Student Advising Office, Dawson Hall. Minor programs in Science can be selected from any of the Science groups.

The McGill University eCalendar provides detailed program information and course descriptions for each academic department, but cannot alone provide assistance in realistic and meaningful program planning. Departmental advisers are responsible for degree programs which are administered by their departments and give specific information about prerequisites, courses, approval for required courses and program selection. Since they are also generally members of McGill University's academic staff, they can also provide useful insight into potential options for further study in their respective disciplines.

Students initially intending to pursue a particular area of study often develop other interests requiring them to change their academic profile. It is usually possible to change programs, providing that there has been consultation with the appropriate advisers.

For detailed information about courses and programs consult the McGill University eCalendar.

3.3.4 Bachelor of Arts & Science program types

Students are required to take the integrative course BASC 201 (3 credits).

Students who need 96 or fewer credits to complete their B.A. & Sc. degree requirements (3-year degree) must select one of the following program combinations at the time of registration: multi-track, interfaculty program, joint honours program, or honours program.

The multi-track system is intended for students who want a program that includes significant components from both Arts and Science. Students must complete a major concentration from one faculty, and  a second major concentration from the other faculty.

Interfaculty programs are interdisciplinary in nature. There are currently three such programs: Environment, Cognitive Science, and Sustainability, Science and Society. Students in these programs complete 54 credits in the interfaculty program, a Minor Concentration of 18 credits, and 3 credits of integrative courses. In order to maintain a balance of Arts and Science in the program, at least 21 credits must be from each of Arts and Science.

Joint Honours programs are similar to the multi-track option, except that students select two Joint Honours components, one from Arts and one from Science. At present, the choice of Science component is restricted to either Math or Psychology. However, there is a great range of choices for the Arts component. To choose the Joint Honours option, students must meet the GPA and CGPA requirements set out in the departmental sections.

There are currently three Honours programs, Environment; Cognitive Science; and Sustainability, Science and Society. These programs are similar to the Interfaculty program, but they have additional GPA requirements and research courses. Students must also select a minor or minor concentration from either Arts or Science, such that they complete at least 21 credits in Arts and 21 credits in Science across their Honours program and their minor or minor concentration.

For more information about the appropriate program combinations for this degree, please consult the McGill eCalendar section for information about the B.A. & Sc. degree.

For more information about Arts or Science departments, please consult the appropriate McGill eCalendar sections, or the Arts or Science departmental websites.

The McGill University calendar provides detailed program information and course descriptions for each academic department, but cannot alone provide assistance in realistic and meaningful program planning. Departmental advisers are responsible for degree programs that are administered by their departments and give specific information about prerequisites, courses, approval for required courses and program selection. Since they are also generally members of McGill University's academic staff, they can also provide useful insight into potential options for further study in their respective disciplines.

Students initially intending to pursue a particular area of study often develop other interests requiring them to change their academic profile. It is possible to change programs as necessary, providing that there has been consultation with the appropriate advisers.

For the most current information about the B.A. & Sc. programs consult the eCalendar, Bachelor of Arts and Science.


3.4 Freshman Interest Groups

What are FIGs?

  • A FIG comprises approximately 25 newly admitted B.Sc. and B.A. & Sc. students.
  • Only newly admitted freshman (U0) students can register for a FIG on Minerva.
  • FIGs are led by a member of the SOUSA office and an upper-year student.
  • The FIGs meets for one hour, normally once every two weeks, during the fall semester only.
  • FIGS 196 is a non-credit activity, does not cost anything, and does not appear on your McGill transcript.

What are the advantages of attending a FIG?

  • Interact in an informal setting with advisers, guest speakers and other students.
  • Explore topics not normally discussed in the regular classroom setting, ranging from careers in Science to the structure of universities.
  • Introduce discussion topics of special interest to you.
  • Be better informed regarding programs and research opportunities.

What topics might be discussed in a FIG?

  • Choosing Academic Programs: myths and facts
  • Exchanges and Travel Opportunities
  • Research opportunities
  • How to study more effectively and time management
  • Professional schools
  • Careers in Science (and related fields)
  • Part time jobs/volunteer work
  • Internships and field studies
  • Extracurricular activities on campus

How to register for a FIG

Register for one of the sections of FIGS 196 on Minerva.

Frequently asked questions

I already have friends in Montreal, so why do I need to attend a FIG?
FIGs foster mentorship between first-year students, between first-year and upper-year students, and between students and advisers. FIGs will help you become better informed about the resources that McGill provides to students, opportunities that are available, and your responsibilities.

Will I get credit for FIGs?
FIGs 196 is a non-credit activity, does not cost anything, and does not appear on your transcript; however, FIGs will help ease your transition to university life at McGill.

Will the FIGs focus on specific science subjects?
No. FIGs are not courses, so the FIGs leaders will not lecture on specific topics. Because the topics are of general interest and are designed to help students become familiar with all aspects of student life, the format is informal and very interactive. You will have plenty of opportunity to ask questions. You will also be able to suggest topics that are of specific interest to you.

Will the FIGs help me to learn about requirements for medical school?
One of the FIG sessions may be devoted to a discussion of medical school requirements and answering questions. There may be medical students who will discuss the route they took to get into the Faculty of Medicine. You may also learn about careers that are related to medicine.

Is attendance mandatory?
No. However, your FIG leader will organize guest speakers, so it is very important that you advise him or her if you will not attend.

Will FIGs help me to choose my departmental program?
There may be discussions about the disciplines available to B.Sc. and B.A. & Sc. students. You will have an opportunity to ask questions about the value of studying a particular discipline. You may meet senior undergraduates from several different departments. You could learn about differences between various types of programs available (honours, majors, faculty programs, minors) as well as the advantages and disadvantages of choosing one type of program over another.

Will FIGs give information about careers in science?
One FIG session may introduce McGill's Career and Placement Service (CaPS). During this session, there may be a guest from CaPS who will inform you about, among other things, job opportunities of particular interest to science students. You could also hear about grad school requirements and funding opportunities.

Will we learn about issues not directly related to academics?
Yes. One session could be devoted to topics such as off-campus housing, getting around Montreal, clubs and teams on campus, where to get information about McGill events, McGill Athletics. Topics may also cover volunteer opportunities around Montreal, services offered by SSMU and SUS, inexpensive restaurants, etc.

Is it possible to take courses at another university to fulfill the requirements of my departmental program or degree?
During one FIGs session, you will learn about McGill's official bilateral and exchange opportunities, McGill's field study programs and Study Away on Your Own. Possible guests at this session are a representative from the Study Abroad Office and students who have been on exchange, study away on their own, or participated in fields studies programs. You will also learn about summer programs abroad, as well as scholarships for students who are interested in international education.

What if the topics being covered don't address my concerns?
You should feel free to suggest to your FIG leaders topics or concerns that are of particular interest to you.

How do I register for a FIG?
To register for one of the FIGS 196 sections, log into Minerva, then select the Student Menu, then choose the link to the Registration Menu.

Who are the FIG leaders?
Each FIG has a SOUSA Adviser as a leader. In addition, many FIG sessions may have guest speakers from other McGill faculties and services, as well as graduate or undergraduate students.

Can I register for a FIG if I am a new student in U1?
U1 students are not eligible to register for a FIG through Minerva. 
 
Can I change my FIG section if it no longer fits in my schedule?
You can add or drop sections until the end of the add/drop period.
 
Who can I contact if I have other questions concerning FIGs?
You can email your SOUSA adviser.

3.5 First-Year Seminars

Registration for First-Year Seminars is limited to students in their first year of study at McGill, i.e., newly admitted students in U0 or U1. These courses are designed to provide a closer interaction with professors and better working relations with peers than is available in large introductory courses. These seminars endeavour to teach the latest scholarly developments and expose participants to advanced research methods. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum number of students in any seminar is 25, although some are limited to even fewer than that.

Students may take only one First-Year Seminar, either from the Faculty of Science or the Faculty of Arts listings. Students who register for more than one will be obliged to withdraw from all but one of them.

Science First-Year Seminars

  • CHEM 199 FYS: Why Chemistry?
  • EPSC 199 FYS: Earth & Planetary Explor.
  • PSYT 199 FYS: Mental Illness&The Brain

Arts First-Year Seminars

  • HIST 197 FYS: Race in Latin America
  • ISLA 199 FYS: Narr of the Middle East
  • JWST 199 FYS:Images-Jewish Identities
  • LLCU 199 FYS: Literary Animals

4. Later years

4.1 Finishing your first year

As you approach the end of your first year as a Science or Arts & Science student, it's time to start thinking about the next stage of your degree. Here are a couple of things you need to do to make sure the transition is a smooth one:

1. Get advice

All currently registered students who expect to return to McGill are strongly encouraged to see their adviser(s) and to register for courses before leaving for the summer. As all courses are limited by enrolment, you may not be able to register for the courses of your choice if you postpone registration until August. Make sure you register in at least one course prior to the date when late registration fees are charged.

Freshman advising appointments
If at the end of the current term you will have 97 or more credits left to complete your degree requirements, you will be continuing in the freshman program. You should arrange for an advising appointment with a Faculty adviser by contacting SOUSA or by coming to the information counter in Dawson Hall.

Departmental appointments
If at the end of the current term you will have 96 or fewer credits left to complete your degree requirements, you should be registered in a departmental program or preparing to choose one for the upcoming year. Please contact the d