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Textiles from trees: what's old is new again

Two McGill chemistry professors, Theo van de Ven and Jean-Philip Lumb, have developed a new way to make textiles from cellulose, the basic building block of plants, in a breakthrough that has the potential to revitalize Canada’s forestry industry.

Published: 11 Feb 2019

Melting ice sheets may cause ‘climate chaos’ according to new modelling

The weather these days is wild and will be wilder still within a century. In part, because the water from melting ice sheets off Greenland and in the Antarctic will cause extreme weather and unpredictable temperatures around the globe. A study published today in Nature is the first to simulate the effects, under current climate policies, that the two melting ice sheets will have on ocean temperatures and circulation patterns as well as on air temperatures by the year 2100.

Published: 6 Feb 2019

Amélie Desmarais attends the Emerging Leaders 2019 Conference

Amélie Desmarais, our MSc student, attended the Emerging Leaders 2019 Conference that was held in Norway in January of this year.

Published: 1 Feb 2019

Mila inaugurates its new premises in Mile-Ex

Mila – Quebec Institute of Artificial Intelligence officially inaugurated its new premises at the O Mile-Ex complex this week, in the presence of the Minister of Economy and Innovation for the government of Quebec, Pierre Fitzgibbon, and more than 200 partners and players in the Quebec artificial intelligence ecosystem.

Published: 30 Jan 2019

Creating attraction between molecules deep in the periodic table

Imagine a waterproof computer. It’s not going to happen tomorrow, but it may no longer be a pipedream since a McGill-led international research team has shown for the first time that it is possible to form strong, stable attractions between some of the heavier elements in the periodic table.

Published: 22 Jan 2019

Men and women remember pain differently

Scientists increasingly believe that one of the driving forces in chronic pain—the number one health problem in both prevalence and burden—appears to be the memory of earlier pain. Research published today in Current Biology suggests that there may be variations, based on sex, in the way that pain is remembered in both mice and humans.

Published: 10 Jan 2019

Canada’s CHIME telescope detects second repeating fast radio burst

A Canadian-led team of scientists has found the second repeating fast radio burst (FRB) ever recorded. FRBs are short bursts of radio waves coming from far outside our Milky Way galaxy. Scientists believe FRBs emanate from powerful astrophysical phenomena billions of light years away.

Published: 9 Jan 2019

Hairy nanotechnology provides green anti-scaling solution

A new type of cellulose nanoparticle, invented by McGill University researchers, is at the heart of a more effective and less environmentally damaging solution to one of the biggest challenges facing water-based industries: preventing the buildup of scale.

Published: 31 Oct 2018

Using DNA technology to track marine life

McGill University marine ecologist Jennifer Sunday is bringing cutting-edge DNA analysis to the formidable task of tracking ocean species along Canada’s Pacific coast.

Published: 24 Oct 2018

New cities may make millions more vulnerable to climate change

A forthcoming study of over a hundred new cities being built around the world suggests developers and planning authorities are doing very little to make their projects resilient to climate change. On the contrary, a boom in new city projects in coastal areas – including some on reclaimed land in the sea – appears to fly in the face of the danger of rising sea levels and more frequent extreme weather events.

Published: 10 Sep 2018

Better plastic recycling with enzymes

McGill University chemistry professors Karine Auclair and Tomislav Friščić are following a promising lead on using enzymes to recycle polyethylene terephthalate (PET), one of the world’s most widely used plastics.

Published: 4 Sep 2018

Greener alternative to lithium-ion batteries

The runaway popularity of personal electronic devices has led to a huge global demand for compact yet powerful rechargeable batteries. Since hitting the market in the 1990s, lithium-ion technology has taken the lead in meeting this need.

Published: 27 Aug 2018

Potential huge energy savings through nanocatalysts for nitrogen fixation

A fundamental component of protein, nitrogen is the most common pure element on Earth, making up nearly 80 percent of our atmosphere. Yet despite its abundance, atmospheric nitrogen cannot enter the food chain without first being converted into a form that can be used by plants.

Published: 20 Aug 2018

Green polymers inspired by biology

McGill University chemistry professor Matthew Harrington is aiming to develop a renewable alternative to petrochemical plastics by mimicking the astonishing chemistry of the velvet worm – a creature that has made a name for itself through its projectile slime.

Published: 13 Aug 2018

Artists Among Us

Gault Nature Reserve special edition Calling all scientist-artists:

Does the FOREST inspire you? In honour of the 60th anniversary of the Gault Nature Reserve in Mont-Saint-Hilaire, a special edition of the Artists Among Us art exhibition will take place during the months of July and August 2018 at the Alice Johannsen Pavilion of the Reserve.

Email address:
Published: 26 Mar 2018

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