Quick Links


Unregulated 'internet of things' industry puts us all at risk

"Back in the 1970s, for much of the 1980s, and even into the 1990s, it was hard to foresee just how integrated this far-flung global infrastructure would become with every aspect of our lives and thus have deep security implications." Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe chair in scientific and technological literacy at McGill. CBC News

Published: 26Oct2016

International Criminal Court: South Africa's Withdrawal

"South Africa's main opposition party on Monday tried to block a government plan to withdraw from the International Criminal Court, saying the move is illegal and that the country's top court should intervene.

Published: 25Oct2016

How this Montreal grad student plans to finish school with zero debt

When Olivia White goes job hunting in a few years’ time after she graduates, she will be bringing a unique set of skills to the table. That’s because the 24 year old, who is pursuing an MA in urban planning at McGill University, has spent the last five years tree planting in northern B.C., a gruelling job that requires a lot of resilience. The Globe and Mail

Published: 25Oct2016

Essential tremor sufferers needed for groundbreaking study

You probably know someone who has it. It is the most common movement disorder, yet most people don’t even know its name.

Essential tremor affects nearly one per cent of the world’s population, increasing to four per cent of those over 40. The involuntary shaking of hands is the most common symptom, but symptoms can also include shaking of the head and legs.

Published: 25Oct2016

Why some dental implants work and others don’t

Each year, about 500,000 North Americans get dental implants. If you are one of them, and are preparing to have an implant, it might be a good idea to start taking beta blockers, medication that controls high blood pressure, for a while. And to stop taking heartburn pills.

A body of research from McGill led-teams indicates that in order to raise the odds that dental implants will attach properly, there are clear benefits to taking certain common medications and avoiding others.

Bone cell growth, healing and death

Published: 25Oct2016

A key to unlocking the mystery of triple negative breast cancer

A study conducted at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) suggests screening breast cancer patients for the prolactin receptor could improve the prognosis for patients and may help them avoid unnecessary and invasive treatments. Using a database of 580 women with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), the researchers found that survival was prolonged in patients who expressed the prolactin receptor and that prolactin hormone was able to reduce the aggressive behavior of cancerous cells. It does so by decreasing their ability to divide and form new tumors.

Published: 25Oct2016

Thorn in the side of war criminals, ayatollahs and dictators

Montreal law professor Payam Akhavan has risked life in conflict zones in globetrotting crusade for human rights

Read more: Toronto Star 

Published: 22Oct2016

DDoS Attack: what does it tell us?

“Some major internet companies suffered service disruptions for several hours on Friday morning as internet infrastructure provider Dyn said it was hit by a cyber attack that disrupted traffic mainly on the U.S. East Coast.” (CBC)

Published: 21Oct2016

Hillary Clinton Should Embrace Her Centrism

(By Gil Troy, professor of history at McGill University, a visiting scholar at the Brookings Institution and the author of The Age of Clinton: America in the 1990s) When I say to my students, “Donald Trump promises to…” they all shout “make America great again!”—even if most hate him. When I say “And Hillary promises…” I get a few “Stronger Together” replies, but mostly awkward silence. After three debates and 30 years in politics, Hillary Clinton’s political identity remains mysterious.

Read more: TIME


Published: 21Oct2016

A Tale of Two Sexes

Men and women are not created equal — women have a higher risk of some musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) than men. That was the message that Dr. Julie Côté, associate professor and chair of the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education at McGill University in Montreal, delivered during a keynote speech at the 9th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders, held in Toronto on June 23.

OHS Canada (Canada's Occupational Health & Safety Magazine)


Published: 21Oct2016