workshops past and present

Hi MQHRG,

A reminder about the EARLY BIRD SPECIAL for the McGill-based courses listed below. Register by May 24, 2019 for Early Bird prices!

The 2019 McGill Summer Institute in Innovative Methodologies is now open for registration with 5 courses: Mixed Methods in Health Research, Life Course Epidemiology, Developing Creative Approaches to Learning and Research Inquiry, Meta-Analysis of Clinical & Basic Science Research, and Qualitative Health Research with Children & Youth.

The focus of the Summer Institute is Innovative Methodologies, useful for both researchers and clinician scientists. Visit the dentistry website for more information (registration) and updates: https://www.mcgill.ca/dentistry/summer-institute.

Since many participants have expressed a desire to come back, a discount is available for participants returning for another course, in addition to the early bird and 2-course discounts.

Dates of the courses

Mixed Methods in Health Research | June 25-29

Life Course Epidemiology | June 25-29

Developing Creative Approaches to Learning and Research Inquiry June 28-29

Meta-Analysis of Clinical & Basic Science Research | July 2-6

Qualitative Health Research with Children & Youth | July 2-6

 

Summer Workshop: Arts-as-Research Practice

Are you a researcher, scholar, or graduate student in the field of health, social sciences, or education? Are you interested in exploring and deepening your knowledge and practice of graphic, visual, and performative methods as part of your research or teaching?

CCQHR is hosting a 4-day summer workshop from June 24-27th, 2019, that may be right for you!

PDF icon final_cq_arts_based_workshop_june24-27_2019-min.pdf

 

2017 Advanced Seminar on Critical Qualitative Health Inquiry, October 2-3, 2017, McGill University, Montreal QC 

Health researchers from around the globe, including Canada, USA, UK, Australia, Japan, Israel, Germany, Norway, Brazil, and the Netherlands, gathered on October 2-3, 2017 at the McGill University Faculty Club to discuss insights and challenges related to critical qualitative health research. The day was structured to promote discussion, debate and exchange around ideas presented by two guest speakers: Joan Eakin, Professor Emerita at the University of Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health and Founding Director of the Centre for Critical Qualitative Health Research; and, Paula Gardner, Assistant Professor in Health Sciences at Brock University and Academic Fellow at the Centre for Critical Qualitative Health Research. Professor Eakin discussed critical qualitative research as a transgressive scientific practice and the implications for researchers as well as in the health field more generally. Professor Gardner shared her personal experiences and reflections as a critical qualitative health researcher in a hospital setting with lessons for all engaged in participatory approaches.  

The following themes emerged in the sessions following each talk: 

the tensions of bringing theoretically-informed qualitative research into positivist, health research settings;  

the challenges of maintaining rigour and integrity as a critical qualitative researcher while also meeting health research’s structural demands, for instance funding and publication criteria;   

the personal (and therefore sensitive) reality of different epistemological standpoints, and the concomitant relational/interpersonal tensions these bring; and,   

the idea that “Everything is Data!” (Joan Eakin) and its associated ethical and methodological challenges.   

The links to a video recording of each presentation can be found here:  

Professor Joan Eakin – https://vimeo.com/241680802  

Professor Paula Gardner – https://vimeo.com/247497904  

Acknowledgements 

With thanks to our international scientific committee:   

Co-Chairs: Susan Law – DIPEx Canada, Trillium Health Partners-Institute for Better Health, and University of Toronto 

Mary Ellen Macdonald – Chair, MQHRG and Associate Professor, McGill Dentistry  

Members: Rachel Grob (USA); Lisa Hinton (UK); Sara Ryan (UK); Lorraine Smith (AU)  

With thanks to the generous financial and in-kind contributions from DIPEx International (see: www.dipexinternational.org), Trillium Health Partners-Institute for Better Health, the McGill Qualitative Health Research Group, the Health Experiences Research Canada team, and the Quebec Network for Oral and Bone Health Research (Le Réseau de recherche en santé buccodentaire et osseuse (RSBO).  


Summer Institute in Innovative Methodologies offered by McGill Faculties of Dentistry and Family Medicine

July 3rd to 7th, July 10th to 14th, or both!

Life Course Epidemiology | July 3-7
Mixed Methods in Health Research | July 10-14

http://www.cvent.com/events/mcgill-summer-institute/custom-18-ec25deb003c8465fa1d6d8a2ec195e9d.aspx


Dr. Emmanuelle Bélanger's an introductory NVivo workshop on June 19th, 2017 from 1-4 PM to those who are interested in learning about NVivo functionality. The tutorial will be carried out with NVivo for Mac Version 11 but PC users are also welcome. Please note that the date of the workshop has changed from the date in the brochure! 

https://mcgill.ca/familymed/education/graduate-programs/summer-session


Workshops on Social Science Research 2017

Interesting ‘Workshops on Social Science Research’ from the Department of Political Science at Concordia University.
http://www.concordia.ca/artsci/polisci/wssr/registration/non-credit/spring2017-noncredit.html

Epistemological Bootcamp Drill #1: Surveying the Paradigmatic Battlefield: Articulating and Nourishing your Paradigm

Victoria Burns, Postdoctoral Fellow, Urbanisation, Culture & Society Research Centre, Insitut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) AND Daniel A. Nagel, RN, Assistant Professor, St. Frances Xavier University

Required Readings: 
Staller, KM (2013). Epistemological boot camp: The politics of science and what every qualitative researcher needs to know to survive in the academy. Qualitative Social Work 12:395‐413.  


Nagel, D. A., Burns, V. F., Tilley, C., & Aubin, D. (2015). When novice researchers adopt constructivist grounded theory: Navigating less travelled paradigmatic and methodological paths in PhD dissertation work. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 10, 365-383. Retrieved from http://ijds.org/Volume10/IJDSv10p365-383Nagel1901.pdf


Lincoln YS, Guba EG. (2000) Paradigmatic controversies, contradictions, and emerging confluences. In: Denzin NK, Lincoln YS, eds. Handbook of Qualitative Research. 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks: Sage; 2000:163‐188.

Time: Wednesday September 23, 2015, 3‐5pm
Location: 2001 McGill College Ave, room 547


Epistemological Bootcamp Drill #2: Is your research ‘rigorous’? Interpreting and articulating rigor within your paradigm. 

Victoria Burns, Postdoctoral Fellow, Urbanisation, Culture & Society Research Centre, Insitut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) 

Required Readings: 
Morse, JM (2015) Critical analysis of strategies for determining rigor in qualitative inquiry. Qualitative Health Research, 25(9), 1212‐1222.  

Davies, D, & Dodd, J (2002) Qualitative research and the question of rigor. Qualitative Health Research, 12(2), 279‐289.  

Sandelowski, M (1993) Rigor or rigor mortis: The problem of rigor in qualitative research revisited.

Suggested Reading:Schwandt, TA (1996) Farewell to criteriology. Qualitative Inquiry, 2(1), 58‐72.

Homework Please come prepared to discuss how and why you have used the concept of rigor in your own work (or why you have not). Which authors/standards did you use, and why?

Time: Thursday, December 10 2015, 3‐5pm

Location: 2001 McGill College Ave, room 547


Epistemological Bootcamp Drill #3:Sample size, saturation, and participant selection: Locating your justifications within your paradigm. 

Victoria Burns, Postdoctoral Fellow, Urbanisation, Culture & Society Research Centre, Insitut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) 

Special Panel:

David K. Wright, PhD (University of Ottawa) and Shawn-Renee Hordyk, PhD (McGill University)

Required Readings

Baker SE, & Edwards R. (2012) How many qualitative interviews is enough? Expert voices and early career reflections on sampling and cases in qualitative research.http://eprints.ncrm.ac.uk/2273/4/how_many_interviews.pdf

Sandelowski M. (1995) Sample size in qualitative research. Research in Nursing & Health, 18, 179-183.

Mason M. (2010) Sample size and saturation in PhD studies using qualitative interviews. Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 11(3).

An open letter to The BMJ editors on qualitative research. Published 10 February 2016) BMJ 2016;352:i563

 http://www.bmj.com/content/352/bmj.i563.full?ijkey=c1RmesunyZazzfY&keytype=ref

Response from the Editors: Qualitative research and The BMJ. BMJ 2016;352:i641 doi:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i641

Please come prepared to discuss how and why you have written about sampling in your own work. Which authors/standards did you use, and why?

Time: Thursday, February 18 2016, 3‐5pm

Location: 2001 McGill College Ave, room 547


Drill #4 MQHRG Epistemological Boot Camp   Ending the mission: Knowledge mobilization and making use of qualitative research

Date: Thursday, April 14, 2016, 3‐5pm

Location: 2001 McGill College Ave, room 547

Victoria Burns, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) Special Guest Franco Carnevale, PhD, Professor, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University.

Required Readings: Botorff, J (2015). Knowledge translation: Where are the qualitative health researchers? Qualitative Health Research, 25(11), 1461‐1462. 

Graham, ID, Logan, J, Harrison, MB, Straus, SE, Tetroe, J, Caswell, W, & Robinson, N. (2006). Lost in knowledge translation: Time for a map? Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 26(1), 13‐24.  

Greenhalgh, T, & Wieringa, S (2011). Is it time to drop the ‘knowledge translation’ metaphor? A critical literature review. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 104(12), 501‐509.  

Kontos, PC, & Poland, BD (2009). Mapping new theoretical and methodological terrain for knowledge translation: Contributions from critical realism and the arts. Implementation Science, 4(1), 1‐10.

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