International Development Studies Program

The International Development Studies program is designed for those students who wish to take advantage of the resources available at McGill to pursue an interdisciplinary program of study focusing on the problems of the developing countries. IDS is the third largest program in the Faculty of Arts, with an enrollment of over 1300 students. Each year about 150 new students enroll in one of the undergraduate (Minor, Major, Honours) programs.

Program options

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Major

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) - Major Concentration International Development Studies (36 Credits)

 

The B.A.; Major Concentration in International Development Studies focuses on the many challenges facing developing countries, including issues related to socio-economic inequalities and well being, governance, peace and conflict, environment and sustainability, key development-related themes, and training in research methods related to international development studies.

 

Course Selection Guidelines for the Overall Program

1. At least 18 of the 36 credits must be at the 300 level or above.
2. At least 9 credits must be from INTD courses.
3. Students cannot take more than 12 credits in any one discipline other than the INTD discipline.

Students who are pursuing a Field Studies program can have a portion of their Field Studies courses count towards their IDS program. See Adviser in office for details.

Note: Students interested in Management course options listed in the IDS program, must be aware of the credit limitations in place for Arts students taking courses outside of the Faculties of Arts and Science. To consult this policy: https://www.mcgill.ca/study/2020-2021/faculties/arts/undergraduate/ug_arts_course_reqs

 

Required Courses (12 Credits)

 

ECON

208

(3)

Microeconomic Analysis and Applications.

ECON

313

(3)

Economic Development 1.

INTD

200

(3)

Introduction to International Development.

INTD

497

(3)

Advanced Topics in International Development.

 

Complementary Courses (24 Credits)

6 credits from the following two Introductory Categories.

 

Culture, Populations and Development

3 credits from the following:

ANTH

202

(3)

Socio-Cultural Anthropology.

ANTH

212

(3)

Anthropology of Development.

GEOG

210

(3)

Global Places and Peoples.

INTD

350

(3)

Culture and Development.

 

Politics, Society and Development

3 credits from the following:

POLI

227

(3)

Developing Areas/Introduction.

POLI

243

(3)

International Politics of Economic Relations.

POLI

244

(3)

International Politics: State Behaviour.

SOCI

254

(3)

Development and Underdevelopment.

 

Thematic

12-15 credits from the following:

Agriculture

 

AGRI

411

(3)

Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture.

Agricultural Economics

AGEC

430

(3)

Agriculture, Food and Resource Policy.

AGEC

442

(3)

Economics of International Agricultural Development.

Anthropology

Anthropology

 

ANTH

206

(3)

Environment and Culture.

ANTH

209

(3)

Anthropology of Religion.

ANTH

222

(3)

Legal Anthropology.

ANTH

227

(3)

Medical Anthropology.

ANTH

308

(3)

Political Anthropology 01.

ANTH

318

(3)

Globalization and Religion.

ANTH

322

(3)

Social Change in Modern Africa.

ANTH

326

(3)

Anthropology of Latin America.

ANTH

327

(3)

Anthropology of South Asia.

ANTH

329

(3)

Modern Chinese Society and Change.

ANTH

337

(3)

Mediterranean Society and Culture.

ANTH

338

(3)

Native Peoples of North America.

ANTH

339

(3)

Ecological Anthropology.

ANTH

340

(3)

Middle Eastern Society and Culture.

ANTH

341

(3)

Women in Cross-cultural Perspective.

ANTH

342

(3)

Gender, Inequality and the State.

ANTH

343

(3)

Anthropology and the Animal.

ANTH

418

(3)

Environment and Development.

ANTH

422

(3)

Contemporary Latin American Culture and Society.

ANTH

436

(3)

North American Native Peoples.

ANTH

500

(3)

Chinese Diversity and Diaspora.

ANTH

512

(3)

Political Ecology.

Business Administration

* When topic is relevant to IDS.

 

BUSA

433*

(3)

Topics in International Business 1.

Canadian Studies

CANS

315

(3)

Indigenous Art and Culture.

East Asian Studies

EAST

211

(3)

Introduction: East Asian Culture: China.

EAST

213

(3)

Introduction: East Asian Culture: Korea.

Economics

ECON

205

(3)

An Introduction to Political Economy.

ECON

209

(3)

Macroeconomic Analysis and Applications.

ECON

223

(3)

Political Economy of Trade Policy.

ECON

314

(3)

Economic Development 2.

ECON

326

(3)

Ecological Economics.

ECON

336

(3)

The Chinese Economy.

ECON

347

(3)

Economics of Climate Change.

ECON

411

(3)

Economic Development: A World Area.

ECON

416

(3)

Topics in Economic Development 2.

ECON

473

(3)

Income Distribution.

English

ENGL

440

(3)

First Nations and Inuit Literature and Media.

Geography

GEOG

216

(3)

Geography of the World Economy.

GEOG

221

(3)

Environment and Health.

GEOG

302

(3)

Environmental Management 1.

GEOG

303

(3)

Health Geography.

GEOG

310

(3)

Development and Livelihoods.

GEOG

325

(3)

New Master-Planned Cities.

GEOG

403

(3)

Global Health and Environmental Change.

GEOG

408

(3)

Geography of Development.

GEOG

410

(3)

Geography of Underdevelopment: Current Problems.

GEOG

425

(3)

Southeast Asia Urban Field Studies.

GEOG

510

(3)

Humid Tropical Environments.

History

Students may count either HIST 339 or POLI 347 towards their program but not both.

HIST

197

(3)

FYS: Race in Latin America.

HIST

200

(3)

Introduction to African History.

HIST

201

(3)

Modern African History.

HIST

208

(3)

Introduction to East Asian History.

HIST

209

(3)

Introduction to South Asian History.

HIST

213

(3)

World History, 600-2000.

HIST

218

(3)

Modern East Asian History.

HIST

223

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and Empires.

HIST

309

(3)

History of Latin America to 1825.

HIST

317

(3)

Themes in Indian Ocean World History.

HIST

333

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and French.

HIST

338

(3)

Twentieth-Century China.

HIST

339

(3)

Arab-Israeli Conflict.

HIST

340

(3)

History of Modern Egypt.

HIST

341

(3)

Themes in South Asian History.

HIST

360

(3)

Latin America since 1825.

HIST

361

(3)

Topics in Canadian Regional History.

HIST

363

(3)

Canada 1870-1914.

HIST

366

(3)

Themes in Latin American History.

HIST

382

(3)

History of South Africa.

HIST

408

(3)

Colonialism and Native Peoples.

HIST

409

(3)

Topics in Latin American History.

HIST

419

(3)

Central America.

HIST

528

(3)

Indian Ocean World Slave Trade.

International Development Studies

INTD

350

(3)

Culture and Development.

INTD

352

(3)

Disasters and Development .

INTD

354

(3)

Civil Society and Development .

INTD

360

(3)

Environmental Challenges in Development.

INTD

397

(3)

Topics in International Development.

INTD

490

(3)

Development Research Project.

INTD

499

(3)

Internship: International Development Studies.

Islamic Studies

ISLA

200

(3)

Islamic Civilization.

ISLA

210

(3)

Muslim Societies.

ISLA

310

(3)

Women in Islam.

ISLA

345

(3)

Science and Civilization in Islam.

ISLA

355

(3)

Modern History of the Middle East.

ISLA

360

(3)

Islam and Politics.

ISLA

365

(3)

Middle East Since the 1970's.

ISLA

383

(3)

Central Questions in Islamic Law.

ISLA

411

(3)

History: Middle-East 1918-1945.

ISLA

415

(3)

Modern Iran: Anthropological Approach.

ISLA

421

(3)

Islamic Culture - Indian Subcontinent.

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

* When topic is relevant to IDS

 

LACS

497*

(3)

Research Seminar: Latin America and the Caribbean.

Management Core

MGCR

360

(3)

Social Context of Business.

MGCR

382

(3)

International Business.

Management, Organizational Behaviors

ORGB

380

(3)

Cross Cultural Management.

Management Policy

MGPO

435

(3)

The Origins of Capitalism.

MGPO

438

(3)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

MGPO

440

(3)

Strategies for Sustainability.

MGPO

469

(3)

Managing Globalization.

MGPO

475

(3)

Strategies for Developing Countries.

MSUS

402

(3)

Systems Thinking and Sustainability.

Nutrition

NUTR

501

(3)

Nutrition in Developing Countries.

Political Science

POLI

319

(3)

Politics of Latin America.

POLI

322

(3)

Political Change in South Asia.

POLI

324

(3)

Developing Areas/Africa.

POLI

338

(3)

Developing Areas/Topics 1.

POLI

340

(3)

Developing Areas/Middle East.

POLI

341

(3)

Foreign Policy: The Middle East.

POLI

345

(3)

International Organizations.

POLI

347

(3)

Arab-Israel Conflict, Crisis, Peace.

POLI

349

(3)

Foreign Policy: Asia.

POLI

350

(3)

Global Environmental Politics.

POLI

352

(3)

International Policy/Foreign Policy: Africa.

POLI

353

(3)

Politics of the International Refugee Regime.

POLI

359

(3)

Topics in International Politics 1.

POLI

369

(3)

Politics of Southeast Asia.

POLI

372

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and the Canadian State.

POLI

380

(3)

Contemporary Chinese Politics.

POLI

381

(3)

Politics in Japan and South Korea.

POLI

422

(3)

Developing Areas/Topics 2.

POLI

423

(3)

Politics of Ethno-Nationalism.

POLI

435

(3)

Identity and Inequality.

POLI

441

(3)

IPE: Trade.

POLI

442

(3)

International Relations of Ethnic Conflict.

POLI

445

(3)

International Political Economy: Monetary Relations.

POLI

450

(3)

Peacebuilding.

POLI

473

(3)

Democracy and the Market.

POLI

474

(3)

Inequality and Development.

POLI

476

(3)

Religion and Politics.

POLI

480

(3)

Contentious Politics.

Religious Studies

RELG

331

(3)

Religion and Globalization.

RELG

370

(3)

Religion and Human Rights.

RELG

371

(3)

Ethics of Violence/Non-Violence.

RELG

375

(3)

Religion, Politics and Society.

Sociology

SOCI

234

(3)

Population and Society.

SOCI

265

(3)

War, States and Social Change.

SOCI

307

(3)

Globalization.

SOCI

309

(3)

Health and Illness.

SOCI

365

(3)

Health and Development.

SOCI

370

(3)

Sociology: Gender and Development.

SOCI

446

(3)

Colonialism and Society.

SOCI

513

(3)

Social Aspects HIV/AIDS in Africa.

SOCI

519

(3)

Gender and Globalization.

SOCI

520

(3)

Migration and Immigrant Groups.

SOCI

550

(3)

Developing Societies.

SOCI

555

(3)

Comparative Historical Sociology.

Social Work

SWRK

400

(3)

Policy and Practice for Refugees.

 

Methods

3-6 credits from the following: *

Anthropology

ANTH

358

(3)

The Process of Anthropological Research.

Economics

ECON

227D1

(3)

Economic Statistics.

ECON

227D2

(3)

Economic Statistics.

 

International Development Studies

  • INTD 356 (3) Quantitative Methods for Development.
  • INTD 358 (3) Ethnographic Approaches to Development.

Political Science

POLI

210

(3)

Political Science Research Methods.

POLI

461

(3)

Advanced Quantitative Political Science.

Sociology

SOCI

350

(3)

Statistics in Social Research.

SOCI

461

(3)

Quantitative Data Analysis.

SOCI

477

(3)

Qualitative Methods in Sociology.

 

 

* When selecting their Methods courses, students must consult with the IDS Adviser. They must also consult with the most recent Faculty of Arts policy on course overlap: https://www.mcgill.ca/study/faculties/arts/undergraduate/ug_arts_course_...

 

 

FAQ’s Major Concentration 36 credits:

What is the difference between the old and the new IDS program, in summary?

  • Credit amounts are the same, the old program and new are still 36 credits. The key differences are the following:
    • ECON 314 is no longer required, it can be taken as an optional Thematic complimentary course.
    • The Introductory Complimentary courses have been expanded to include more options, and have been separated into two General Introductory categories:
      • Culture, Populations and Development
      • Politics, Society and Development
    • Streams have been removed and condensed into one large Thematic category, with a range of credits to be taken – 12-15 credits. Allowing for more flexibility and enabling students to create purposeful themes aligning with their research interests.
    • We have created a mandatory Methods requirement – a range of 3-6 credits to be taken from the options outlined. As much as possible, we want you to pursue our own INTD options.
    • We require students to take a minimum of 9 credits within INTD course options. We have on offer many INTD courses at the 300 level.

What are methods courses?

  • Methods courses teach students procedures on how to collect, compile, scrutinize, analyze re-searchable empirical data. The methods course should allow the student to deepen their understanding of strengths and challenges within the chosen approach on a general level. The methods course will enable students to understand the data produced in large scale research project and determine outcomes, objectives, and successes/failures.

Within the thematic course options, do I need to create my own theme of course options?

  • As much as possible, and within the constraints of the course offerings from units we do not control, we advise students to pursue courses of interest and within a general theme. In order to create a coherent theme of study, allow for a focus to be created. For example: a student interested in environmental challenges relevant to development, would be more inclined to pursue courses in ANTH, GEOG, AGRI, AGEC and ECON.
  • The condensing and merging of the stream courses, within a large Thematic section will allow students to create sub-themes tailored to their particular interests.

 

Minor

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) - Minor Concentration International Development Studies (18 Credits)

 

The B.A.; Minor Concentration in International Development Studies focuses on the many challenges facing developing countries, including issues related to socio-economic inequalities and well being, governance, peace and conflict, environment and sustainability, and key development-related themes.

Note: Students interested in Management course options listed in the IDS program, must be aware of the credit limitations in place for Arts students taking courses outside of the Faculties of Arts and Science. To consult this policy: https://www.mcgill.ca/study/2020-2021/faculties/arts/undergraduate/ug_arts_course_reqs

 

 

At least 9 of the 18 credits must be at the 300 level or above.

Students who are pursuing a Field Studies program can have a portion of their Field Studies courses count towards their IDS program. See Adviser in office for details.

 

Required Courses (9 Credits)

 

ECON

208

(3)

 

Microeconomic Analysis and Applications.

ECON

313

(3)

 

Economic Development 1.

INTD

200

(3)

 

Introduction to International Development.

 

Complementary Courses (9 Credits)

 

 

Thematic

9 credits from the following:

 

Agriculture

AGRI

411

(3)

Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture.

Agricultural Economics

AGEC

430

(3)

Agriculture, Food and Resource Policy.

AGEC

442

(3)

Economics of International Agricultural Development.

Anthropology

ANTH

202

(3)

Socio-Cultural Anthropology.

ANTH

206

(3)

Environment and Culture.

ANTH

209

(3)

Anthropology of Religion.

ANTH

212

(3)

Anthropology of Development.

ANTH

222

(3)

Legal Anthropology.

ANTH

227

(3)

Medical Anthropology.

ANTH

308

(3)

Political Anthropology 01.

ANTH

318

(3)

Globalization and Religion.

ANTH

322

(3)

Social Change in Modern Africa.

ANTH

326

(3)

Anthropology of Latin America.

ANTH

327

(3)

Anthropology of South Asia.

ANTH

329

(3)

Modern Chinese Society and Change.

ANTH

337

(3)

Mediterranean Society and Culture.

ANTH

338

(3)

Native Peoples of North America.

ANTH

339

(3)

Ecological Anthropology.

ANTH

340

(3)

Middle Eastern Society and Culture.

ANTH

341

(3)

Women in Cross-cultural Perspective.

ANTH

342

(3)

Gender, Inequality and the State.

ANTH

343

(3)

Anthropology and the Animal.

ANTH

418

(3)

Environment and Development.

ANTH

422

(3)

Contemporary Latin American Culture and Society.

ANTH

436

(3)

North American Native Peoples.

ANTH

500

(3)

Chinese Diversity and Diaspora.

ANTH

512

(3)

Political Ecology.

Business Administration

BUSA

433*

(3)

Topics in International Business 1.

* When topic is relevant to IDS.

Canadian Studies

CANS

315

(3)

Indigenous Art and Culture.

East Asian Studies

EAST

211

(3)

Introduction: East Asian Culture: China.

EAST

213

(3)

Introduction: East Asian Culture: Korea.

Economics

ECON

205

(3)

An Introduction to Political Economy.

ECON

209

(3)

Macroeconomic Analysis and Applications.

ECON

223

(3)

Political Economy of Trade Policy.

ECON

314

(3)

Economic Development 2.

ECON

326

(3)

Ecological Economics.

ECON

336

(3)

The Chinese Economy.

ECON

347

(3)

Economics of Climate Change.

ECON

411

(3)

Economic Development: A World Area.

ECON

416

(3)

Topics in Economic Development 2.

ECON

473

(3)

Income Distribution.

English

ENGL

440

(3)

First Nations and Inuit Literature and Media.

Geography

GEOG

210

(3)

Global Places and Peoples.

GEOG

216

(3)

Geography of the World Economy.

GEOG

221

(3)

Environment and Health.

GEOG

302

(3)

Environmental Management 1.

GEOG

303

(3)

Health Geography.

GEOG

310

(3)

Development and Livelihoods.

GEOG

325

(3)

New Master-Planned Cities.

GEOG

403

(3)

Global Health and Environmental Change.

GEOG

408

(3)

Geography of Development.

GEOG

410

(3)

Geography of Underdevelopment: Current Problems.

GEOG

425

(3)

Southeast Asia Urban Field Studies.

GEOG

510

(3)

Humid Tropical Environments.

History

Students may count either HIST 339 or POLI 347 towards their program but not both.

HIST

197

(3)

FYS: Race in Latin America.

HIST

200

(3)

Introduction to African History.

HIST

201

(3)

Modern African History.

HIST

208

(3)

Introduction to East Asian History.

HIST

209

(3)

Introduction to South Asian History.

HIST

213

(3)

World History, 600-2000.

HIST

218

(3)

Modern East Asian History.

HIST

223

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and Empires.

HIST

309

(3)

History of Latin America to 1825.

HIST

317

(3)

Themes in Indian Ocean World History.

HIST

333

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and French.

HIST

338

(3)

Twentieth-Century China.

HIST

339

(3)

Arab-Israeli Conflict.

HIST

340

(3)

History of Modern Egypt.

HIST

341

(3)

Themes in South Asian History.

HIST

360

(3)

Latin America since 1825.

HIST

361

(3)

Topics in Canadian Regional History.

HIST

363

(3)

Canada 1870-1914.

HIST

366

(3)

Themes in Latin American History.

HIST

382

(3)

History of South Africa.

HIST

408

(3)

Colonialism and Native Peoples.

HIST

409

(3)

Topics in Latin American History.

HIST

419

(3)

Central America.

HIST

528

(3)

Indian Ocean World Slave Trade.

International Development Studies

INTD

350

(3)

Culture and Development.

INTD

352

(3)

Disasters and Development .

INTD

354

(3)

Civil Society and Development .

INTD

356

(3)

Quantitative Methods for Development .

INTD

358

(3)

Ethnographic Approaches to Development .

INTD

360

(3)

Environmental Challenges in Development.

INTD

397

(3)

Topics in International Development.

INTD

490

(3)

Development Research Project.

INTD

499

(3)

Internship: International Development Studies.

Islamic Studies

ISLA

200

(3)

Islamic Civilization.

ISLA

210

(3)

Muslim Societies.

ISLA

310

(3)

Women in Islam.

ISLA

345

(3)

Science and Civilization in Islam.

ISLA

355

(3)

Modern History of the Middle East.

ISLA

360

(3)

Islam and Politics.

ISLA

365

(3)

Middle East Since the 1970's.

ISLA

383

(3)

Central Questions in Islamic Law.

ISLA

411

(3)

History: Middle-East 1918-1945.

ISLA

415

(3)

Modern Iran: Anthropological Approach.

ISLA

421

(3)

Islamic Culture - Indian Subcontinent.

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

LACS

497

(3)

Research Seminar: Latin America and the Caribbean.

* When topic is relevant to IDS.

Management Core

MGCR

360

(3)

Social Context of Business.

MGCR

382

(3)

International Business.

Management, Organizational Behavior

ORGB

380

(3)

Cross Cultural Management.

Management Policy

MGPO

435

(3)

The Origins of Capitalism.

MGPO

438

(3)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

MGPO

440

(3)

Strategies for Sustainability.

MGPO

469

(3)

Managing Globalization.

MGPO

475

(3)

Strategies for Developing Countries.

MSUS

402

(3)

Systems Thinking and Sustainability.

Nutrition

NUTR

501

(3)

Nutrition in Developing Countries.

Political Science

POLI

227

(3)

Developing Areas/Introduction.

POLI

243

(3)

International Politics of Economic Relations.

POLI

244

(3)

International Politics: State Behaviour.

POLI

319

(3)

Politics of Latin America.

POLI

322

(3)

Political Change in South Asia.

POLI

324

(3)

Developing Areas/Africa.

POLI

338

(3)

Developing Areas/Topics 1.

POLI

340

(3)

Developing Areas/Middle East.

POLI

341

(3)

Foreign Policy: The Middle East.

POLI

345

(3)

International Organizations.

POLI

347

(3)

Arab-Israel Conflict, Crisis, Peace.

POLI

349

(3)

Foreign Policy: Asia.

POLI

350

(3)

Global Environmental Politics.

POLI

352

(3)

International Policy/Foreign Policy: Africa.

POLI

353

(3)

Politics of the International Refugee Regime.

POLI

359

(3)

Topics in International Politics 1.

POLI

369

(3)

Politics of Southeast Asia.

POLI

372

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and the Canadian State.

POLI

380

(3)

Contemporary Chinese Politics.

POLI

381

(3)

Politics in Japan and South Korea.

POLI

423

(3)

Politics of Ethno-Nationalism.

POLI

435

(3)

Identity and Inequality.

POLI

441

(3)

IPE: Trade.

POLI

442

(3)

International Relations of Ethnic Conflict.

POLI

445

(3)

International Political Economy: Monetary Relations.

POLI

450

(3)

Peacebuilding.

POLI

473

(3)

Democracy and the Market.

POLI

474

(3)

Inequality and Development.

POLI

476

(3)

Religion and Politics.

POLI

480

(3)

Contentious Politics.

Religious Studies

RELG

331

(3)

Religion and Globalization.

RELG

370

(3)

Religion and Human Rights.

RELG

371

(3)

Ethics of Violence/Non-Violence.

RELG

375

(3)

Religion, Politics and Society.

Sociology

SOCI

234

(3)

Population and Society.

SOCI

254

(3)

Development and Underdevelopment.

SOCI

265

(3)

War, States and Social Change.

SOCI

307

(3)

Globalization.

SOCI

309

(3)

Health and Illness.

SOCI

365

(3)

Health and Development.

SOCI

370

(3)

Sociology: Gender and Development.

SOCI

446

(3)

Colonialism and Society.

SOCI

513

(3)

Social Aspects HIV/AIDS in Africa.

SOCI

519

(3)

Gender and Globalization.

SOCI

520

(3)

Migration and Immigrant Groups.

SOCI

550

(3)

Developing Societies.

SOCI

555

(3)

Comparative Historical Sociology.

Social Work

SWRK

400

(3)

Policy and Practice for Refugees.

 

FAQ’s Minor Concentration 18 credits:

What is the difference between the old and the new IDS program, in summary?

Credit amounts are the same, the old program and new are still 18 credits. The key differences are the following:

  • Removal of Introductory Complimentary course (3 credits)
  • An increase of 3 credits – goes from 6 credits to 9 credits from the Thematic complementary courses
  • Level rule stays the same – 9 credits MUST be at the 300 level or above. This allows students to pursue 3 credits of the 9 credits Thematic at the 200 level if they so wish

Do I need to take a Methods course in the IDS Minor?

No. Methods courses are not required for the Minor. They ARE required for our Major, Honours and Joint Honours.

*Overall there is very little change from the old IDS minor to the new IDS minor.

 

 

 

Honours

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) - Honours International Development Studies (57 Credits)

 

The B.A.; Honours in International Development Studies focuses on the many challenges facing developing countries, including issues related to socio-economic inequalities and well being, governance, peace and conflict, environment and sustainability, key development-related themes, and training in research methods related to international development studies.

Honours students must maintain a CGPA of 3.30 in their program courses and, according to Faculty regulations, a minimum CGPA of 3.00 in general.

 

Course Selection Guidelines for the Overall Program

1. At least 30 of the 57 credits must be at the 300 level or above; 9 credits of these must be at the 400 level or above.
2. At least 12 credits must be from INTD courses.
3. Students cannot take more than 18 credits in any discipline other than the INTD discipline.

Students who are pursuing a Field Studies program can have a portion of their Field Studies courses count towards their IDS program. See Adviser in office for details.

Note: Students interested in Management course options listed in the IDS program, must be aware of the credit limitations in place for Arts students taking courses outside of the Faculties of Arts and Science. To consult this policy: https://www.mcgill.ca/study/2020-2021/faculties/arts/undergraduate/ug_arts_course_reqs

 

Required Courses (12 Credits)

 

ECON

208

(3)

Microeconomic Analysis and Applications.

ECON

313

(3)

Economic Development 1.

INTD

200

(3)

Introduction to International Development.

INTD

498

(3)

Honours Seminar in International Development .

 

Complementary Courses (45 Credits)

6 credits from the following two Introductory Categories.

 

Culture, Populations and Development

3 credits from the following:

ANTH

202

(3)

Socio-Cultural Anthropology.

ANTH

212

(3)

Anthropology of Development.

GEOG

210

(3)

Global Places and Peoples.

INTD

350

(3)

Culture and Development.

 

Politics, Society and Development

 

POLI

227

(3)

Developing Areas/Introduction.

POLI

243

(3)

International Politics of Economic Relations.

POLI

244

(3)

International Politics: State Behaviour.

SOCI

254

(3)

Development and Underdevelopment.

 

Thematic

30-33 credits from the following:

Agriculture

AGRI

411

(3)

Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture.

Agricultural Economics

AGEC

430

(3)

Agriculture, Food and Resource Policy.

AGEC

442

(3)

Economics of International Agricultural Development.

Anthropology

ANTH

206

(3)

Environment and Culture.

ANTH

209

(3)

Anthropology of Religion.

ANTH

222

(3)

Legal Anthropology.

ANTH

227

(3)

Medical Anthropology.

ANTH

308

(3)

Political Anthropology 01.

ANTH

318

(3)

Globalization and Religion.

ANTH

322

(3)

Social Change in Modern Africa.

ANTH

326

(3)

Anthropology of Latin America.

ANTH

327

(3)

Anthropology of South Asia.

ANTH

329

(3)

Modern Chinese Society and Change.

ANTH

337

(3)

Mediterranean Society and Culture.

ANTH

338

(3)

Native Peoples of North America.

ANTH

339

(3)

Ecological Anthropology.

ANTH

340

(3)

Middle Eastern Society and Culture.

ANTH

341

(3)

Women in Cross-cultural Perspective.

ANTH

342

(3)

Gender, Inequality and the State.

ANTH

343

(3)

Anthropology and the Animal.

ANTH

418

(3)

Environment and Development.

ANTH

422

(3)

Contemporary Latin American Culture and Society.

ANTH

436

(3)

North American Native Peoples.

ANTH

500

(3)

Chinese Diversity and Diaspora.

ANTH

512

(3)

Political Ecology.

Business Administration

BUSA

433*

(3)

Topics in International Business 1.

 

* When topic is relevant to IDS.

Canadian Studies

CANS

315

(3)

Indigenous Art and Culture.

East Asian Studies

EAST

211

(3)

Introduction: East Asian Culture: China.

EAST

213

(3)

Introduction: East Asian Culture: Korea.

Economics

ECON

205

(3)

An Introduction to Political Economy.

ECON

209

(3)

Macroeconomic Analysis and Applications.

ECON

223

(3)

Political Economy of Trade Policy.

ECON

314

(3)

Economic Development 2.

ECON

326

(3)

Ecological Economics.

ECON

336

(3)

The Chinese Economy.

ECON

347

(3)

Economics of Climate Change.

ECON

411

(3)

Economic Development: A World Area.

ECON

416

(3)

Topics in Economic Development 2.

ECON

473

(3)

Income Distribution.

English

ENGL

440

(3)

First Nations and Inuit Literature and Media.

Geography

GEOG

216

(3)

Geography of the World Economy.

GEOG

221

(3)

Environment and Health.

GEOG

302

(3)

Environmental Management 1.

GEOG

303

(3)

Health Geography.

GEOG

310

(3)

Development and Livelihoods.

GEOG

325

(3)

New Master-Planned Cities.

GEOG

403

(3)

Global Health and Environmental Change.

GEOG

408

(3)

Geography of Development.

GEOG

410

(3)

Geography of Underdevelopment: Current Problems.

GEOG

425

(3)

Southeast Asia Urban Field Studies.

GEOG

510

(3)

Humid Tropical Environments.

History

Students may count either HIST 339 or POLI 347 towards their program but not both.

HIST

197

(3)

FYS: Race in Latin America.

HIST

200

(3)

Introduction to African History.

HIST

201

(3)

Modern African History.

HIST

208

(3)

Introduction to East Asian History.

HIST

209

(3)

Introduction to South Asian History.

HIST

213

(3)

World History, 600-2000.

HIST

218

(3)

Modern East Asian History.

HIST

223

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and Empires.

HIST

309

(3)

History of Latin America to 1825.

HIST

317

(3)

Themes in Indian Ocean World History.

HIST

333

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and French.

HIST

338

(3)

Twentieth-Century China.

HIST

339

(3)

Arab-Israeli Conflict.

HIST

340

(3)

History of Modern Egypt.

HIST

341

(3)

Themes in South Asian History.

HIST

360

(3)

Latin America since 1825.

HIST

361

(3)

Topics in Canadian Regional History.

HIST

363

(3)

Canada 1870-1914.

HIST

366

(3)

Themes in Latin American History.

HIST

382

(3)

History of South Africa.

HIST

408

(3)

Colonialism and Native Peoples.

HIST

409

(3)

Topics in Latin American History.

HIST

419

(3)

Central America.

HIST

528

(3)

Indian Ocean World Slave Trade.

International Development Studies

INTD

350

(3)

Culture and Development.

INTD

352

(3)

Disasters and Development .

INTD

354

(3)

Civil Society and Development .

INTD

360

(3)

Environmental Challenges in Development.

INTD

397

(3)

Topics in International Development.

INTD

490

(3)

Development Research Project.

INTD

491

(3)

Honours Thesis.

INTD

492

(6)

Honours Thesis with Field Research.

INTD

497

(3)

Advanced Topics in International Development.

INTD

499

(3)

Internship: International Development Studies.

INTD

597

(3)

Seminar in International Development.

Islamic Studies

ISLA

200

(3)

Islamic Civilization.

ISLA

210

(3)

Muslim Societies.

ISLA

310

(3)

Women in Islam.

ISLA

345

(3)

Science and Civilization in Islam.

ISLA

355

(3)

Modern History of the Middle East.

ISLA

360

(3)

Islam and Politics.

ISLA

365

(3)

Middle East Since the 1970's.

ISLA

383

(3)

Central Questions in Islamic Law.

ISLA

411

(3)

History: Middle-East 1918-1945.

ISLA

415

(3)

Modern Iran: Anthropological Approach.

ISLA

421

(3)

Islamic Culture - Indian Subcontinent.

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

LACS

497

(3)

Research Seminar: Latin America and the Caribbean.

* When topic is relevant to IDS

Management Core

MGCR

360

(3)

Social Context of Business.

MGCR

382

(3)

International Business.

Management, Organizational Behavior

ORGB

380

(3)

Cross Cultural Management.

Management Policy

MGPO

435

(3)

The Origins of Capitalism.

MGPO

438

(3)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

MGPO

440

(3)

Strategies for Sustainability.

MGPO

469

(3)

Managing Globalization.

MGPO

475

(3)

Strategies for Developing Countries.

MSUS

402

(3)

Systems Thinking and Sustainability.

Nutrition

NUTR

501

(3)

Nutrition in Developing Countries.

Political Science

POLI

319

(3)

Politics of Latin America.

POLI

322

(3)

Political Change in South Asia.

POLI

324

(3)

Developing Areas/Africa.

POLI

338

(3)

Developing Areas/Topics 1.

POLI

340

(3)

Developing Areas/Middle East.

POLI

341

(3)

Foreign Policy: The Middle East.

POLI

345

(3)

International Organizations.

POLI

347

(3)

Arab-Israel Conflict, Crisis, Peace.

POLI

349

(3)

Foreign Policy: Asia.

POLI

350

(3)

Global Environmental Politics.

POLI

352

(3)

International Policy/Foreign Policy: Africa.

POLI

353

(3)

Politics of the International Refugee Regime.

POLI

359

(3)

Topics in International Politics 1.

POLI

369

(3)

Politics of Southeast Asia.

POLI

372

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and the Canadian State.

POLI

380

(3)

Contemporary Chinese Politics.

POLI

381

(3)

Politics in Japan and South Korea.

POLI

422

(3)

Developing Areas/Topics 2.

POLI

423

(3)

Politics of Ethno-Nationalism.

POLI

435

(3)

Identity and Inequality.

POLI

441

(3)

IPE: Trade.

POLI

442

(3)

International Relations of Ethnic Conflict.

POLI

445

(3)

International Political Economy: Monetary Relations.

POLI

450

(3)

Peacebuilding.

POLI

473

(3)

Democracy and the Market.

POLI

474

(3)

Inequality and Development.

POLI

476

(3)

Religion and Politics.

POLI

480

(3)

Contentious Politics.

Religious Studies

RELG

331

(3)

Religion and Globalization.

RELG

370

(3)

Religion and Human Rights.

RELG

371

(3)

Ethics of Violence/Non-Violence.

RELG

375

(3)

Religion, Politics and Society.

Sociology

SOCI

234

(3)

Population and Society.

SOCI

265

(3)

War, States and Social Change.

SOCI

307

(3)

Globalization.

SOCI

309

(3)

Health and Illness.

SOCI

365

(3)

Health and Development.

SOCI

370

(3)

Sociology: Gender and Development.

SOCI

446

(3)

Colonialism and Society.

SOCI

513

(3)

Social Aspects HIV/AIDS in Africa.

SOCI

519

(3)

Gender and Globalization.

SOCI

520

(3)

Migration and Immigrant Groups.

SOCI

550

(3)

Developing Societies.

SOCI

555

(3)

Comparative Historical Sociology.

Social Work

SWRK

400

(3)

Policy and Practice for Refugees.

 

Methods

6-9 credits from the following: *

Anthropology

ANTH

358

(3)

The Process of Anthropological Research.

Economics

ECON

227D1

(3)

Economic Statistics.

ECON

227D2

(3)

Economic Statistics.

International Development Studies

INTD

356

(3)

Quantitative Methods for Development .

INTD

358

(3)

Ethnographic Approaches to Development .

Political Science 

POLI

210

(3)

Political Science Research Methods.

POLI

461

(3)

Advanced Quantitative Political Science.

Sociology

SOCI

350

(3)

Statistics in Social Research.

SOCI

461

(3)

Quantitative Data Analysis.

SOCI

477

(3)

Qualitative Methods in Sociology.

* When selecting their Methods courses, students must consult with the IDS Adviser. They must also consult with the most recent Faculty of Arts policy on course overlap: https://www.mcgill.ca/study//faculties/arts/undergraduate/ug_arts_course...

 

FAQ’s Honours in IDS 57 credits:

What is the difference between the old and the new IDS program, in summary?

    • Credit amounts are the same, the old program and new are still 57 credits. CGPA and Program GPA minimums are maintained.

The key differences are the following:

      • ECON 314 is no longer required, it can be taken as an optional Thematic complimentary course.
      • INTD 497 has been replaced by INTD 498, an Honours level seminar. Honours students can take INTD 497 to count as one of their thematic courses.
      • The Introductory Complimentary courses have been expanded to include more options, and have been separated into two General Introductory categories:
        • Culture, Populations and Development
        • Politics, Society and Development
      • We have removed the requirement of 6-9 credits of Language courses. Language courses will no longer be counted in the new IDS Honours program.
      • Streams have been removed and condensed into one large Thematic category, with a range of credits to be taken – 30-33 credits. Allowing for more flexibility and enabling students to create purposeful themes aligning with their research interests.
      • We have maintained a mandatory Methods requirement and increased the credits to a range of 6-9 credits to be taken from the options outlined. As much as possible, we want you to pursue our own INTD options.
      • We require students to take a minimum of 12 credits within INTD course options. We have on offer many INTD courses at the 300 level.
      • Level rules are maintained; 30 credits of the 57 at the 300 level or above, and of these 9 credits at the 400 level or above.

What are methods courses?

Methods courses teach students procedures on how to collect, compile, scrutinize, analyze re-searchable empirical data. The methods course should allow the student to deepen their understanding of strengths and challenges within the chosen approach on a general level. The methods course will enable students to understand the data produced in large scale research project and determine outcomes, objectives, and successes/failures.

Within the thematic course options, do I need to create my own theme of course options?

    • As much as possible, and within the constraints of the course offerings from units we do not control, we advise students to pursue courses of interest and within a general theme. In order to create a coherent theme of study, allow for a focus to be created. For example: a student interested in environmental challenges relevant to development, would be more inclined to pursue courses in ANTH, GEOG, AGRI, AGEC and ECON.
    • The condensing and merging of the stream courses, within a large Thematic section will allow students to create sub-themes tailored to their particular interests.

NOTE: Language course credits can still be taken by the student within their degree constraints, as electives or you can pursue one of the many Language Minors.

*A Minor in still required in addition to an Honours degree in order to fulfill the BA degree requirements.

Joint Honours

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) - Joint Honours Component International Development Studies (36 Credits)

 

The B.A.; Joint Honours - International Development Studies component focuses on the many challenges facing developing countries, including issues related to socio-economic inequalities and well being, governance, peace and conflict, environment and sustainability, key development-related themes, and training in research methods related to international development studies.

Students wishing to study at the Honours level in two disciplines can combine Joint Honours program components in any two Arts disciplines. For a list of available Joint Honours programs, see "Overview of Programs Offered" and "Joint Honours Programs".
Joint Honours students should consult an adviser in each department to discuss their course selection and their interdisciplinary Honours thesis (if applicable).

Honours students must maintain a CGPA of 3.30 in their program courses and, according to Faculty regulations, a minimum CGPA of 3.00 in general.

 

Course Selection Guidelines for the Overall Program

1. At least 18 of the 36 credits must be at the 300 level or above. Nine credits must be at the 400 level or above.
2. At least 12 credits must be from INTD courses.
3. Students cannot take more than 12 credits in any one discipline other than the INTD discipline.

Students who are pursuing a Field Studies program can have a portion of their Field Studies courses count towards their IDS program. See Adviser in office for details.

NOTE: Students in the Econ-IDS Joint Honours program are required to take ECON 257D1/D2 and therefore cannot also take ECON 227 as part of their IDS program requirements.

Note: Students interested in Management course options listed in the IDS program, must be aware of the credit limitations in place for Arts students taking courses outside of the Faculties of Arts and Science. To consult this policy: https://www.mcgill.ca/study/2020-2021/faculties/arts/undergraduate/ug_arts_course_reqs

 

Required Courses (12 Credits)

 

ECON

208

(3)

Microeconomic Analysis and Applications.

ECON

313

(3)

Economic Development 1.

INTD

200

(3)

Introduction to International Development.

INTD

498

(3)

Honours Seminar in International Development .

 

Complementary Courses (24 Credits)

6 credits from the following two Introductory Categories.

 

Culture, Populations and Development

3 credits from the following:

ANTH

202

(3)

Socio-Cultural Anthropology.

ANTH

212

(3)

Anthropology of Development.

GEOG

210

(3)

Global Places and Peoples.

INTD

350

(3)

Culture and Development.

 

Economic Development and Living Standards

3 credits from the following:

POLI

227

(3)

Developing Areas/Introduction.

POLI

243

(3)

International Politics of Economic Relations.

POLI

244

(3)

International Politics: State Behaviour.

SOCI

254

(3)

Development and Underdevelopment.

 

Thematic (12 Credits)

12 credits from the following:

Agriculture

AGRI

411

(3)

Global Issues on Development, Food and Agriculture.

Agricultural Economics

AGEC

430

(3)

Agriculture, Food and Resource Policy.

AGEC

442

(3)

Economics of International Agricultural Development.

Anthropology

ANTH

206

(3)

Environment and Culture.

ANTH

209

(3)

Anthropology of Religion.

ANTH

222

(3)

Legal Anthropology.

ANTH

227

(3)

Medical Anthropology.

ANTH

308

(3)

Political Anthropology 01.

ANTH

318

(3)

Globalization and Religion.

ANTH

322

(3)

Social Change in Modern Africa.

ANTH

326

(3)

Anthropology of Latin America.

ANTH

327

(3)

Anthropology of South Asia.

ANTH

329

(3)

Modern Chinese Society and Change.

ANTH

337

(3)

Mediterranean Society and Culture.

ANTH

338

(3)

Native Peoples of North America.

ANTH

339

(3)

Ecological Anthropology.

ANTH

340

(3)

Middle Eastern Society and Culture.

ANTH

341

(3)

Women in Cross-cultural Perspective.

ANTH

342

(3)

Gender, Inequality and the State.

ANTH

343

(3)

Anthropology and the Animal.

ANTH

418

(3)

Environment and Development.

ANTH

422

(3)

Contemporary Latin American Culture and Society.

ANTH

436

(3)

North American Native Peoples.

ANTH

500

(3)

Chinese Diversity and Diaspora.

ANTH

512

(3)

Political Ecology.

Business Administration

* When topic is relevant to IDS.

 

BUSA

433*

(3)

Topics in International Business 1.

Canadian Studies

CANS

315

(3)

Indigenous Art and Culture.

East Asian Studies

EAST

211

(3)

Introduction: East Asian Culture: China.

EAST

213

(3)

Introduction: East Asian Culture: Korea.

Economics

ECON

205

(3)

An Introduction to Political Economy.

ECON

209

(3)

Macroeconomic Analysis and Applications.

ECON

223

(3)

Political Economy of Trade Policy.

ECON

314

(3)

Economic Development 2.

ECON

326

(3)

Ecological Economics.

ECON

336

(3)

The Chinese Economy.

ECON

347

(3)

Economics of Climate Change.

ECON

411

(3)

Economic Development: A World Area.

ECON

416

(3)

Topics in Economic Development 2.

ECON

473

(3)

Income Distribution.

English

ENGL

440

(3)

First Nations and Inuit Literature and Media.

Geography

GEOG

216

(3)

Geography of the World Economy.

GEOG

221

(3)

Environment and Health.

GEOG

302

(3)

Environmental Management 1.

GEOG

303

(3)

Health Geography.

GEOG

310

(3)

Development and Livelihoods.

GEOG

325

(3)

New Master-Planned Cities.

GEOG

403

(3)

Global Health and Environmental Change.

GEOG

408

(3)

Geography of Development.

GEOG

410

(3)

Geography of Underdevelopment: Current Problems.

GEOG

425

(3)

Southeast Asia Urban Field Studies.

GEOG

510

(3)

Humid Tropical Environments.

History

Note: Students may count either HIST 339 or POLI 347 towards their program but not both.

HIST

197

(3)

FYS: Race in Latin America.

HIST

200

(3)

Introduction to African History.

HIST

201

(3)

Modern African History.

HIST

208

(3)

Introduction to East Asian History.

HIST

209

(3)

Introduction to South Asian History.

HIST

213

(3)

World History, 600-2000.

HIST

218

(3)

Modern East Asian History.

HIST

223

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and Empires.

HIST

309

(3)

History of Latin America to 1825.

HIST

317

(3)

Themes in Indian Ocean World History.

HIST

333

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and French.

HIST

338

(3)

Twentieth-Century China.

HIST

339

(3)

Arab-Israeli Conflict.

HIST

340

(3)

History of Modern Egypt.

HIST

341

(3)

Themes in South Asian History.

HIST

360

(3)

Latin America since 1825.

HIST

361

(3)

Topics in Canadian Regional History.

HIST

363

(3)

Canada 1870-1914.

HIST

366

(3)

Themes in Latin American History.

HIST

382

(3)

History of South Africa.

HIST

408

(3)

Colonialism and Native Peoples.

HIST

409

(3)

Topics in Latin American History.

HIST

419

(3)

Central America.

HIST

528

(3)

Indian Ocean World Slave Trade.

Islamic Studies

ISLA

200

(3)

Islamic Civilization.

ISLA

210

(3)

Muslim Societies.

ISLA

310

(3)

Women in Islam.

ISLA

345

(3)

Science and Civilization in Islam.

ISLA

355

(3)

Modern History of the Middle East.

ISLA

360

(3)

Islam and Politics.

ISLA

365

(3)

Middle East Since the 1970's.

ISLA

383

(3)

Central Questions in Islamic Law.

ISLA

411

(3)

History: Middle-East 1918-1945.

ISLA

415

(3)

Modern Iran: Anthropological Approach.

ISLA

421

(3)

Islamic Culture - Indian Subcontinent.

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

LACS

497*

(3)

Research Seminar: Latin America and the Caribbean.

* When topic is relevant to IDS.

Management Core

MGCR

360

(3)

Social Context of Business.

MGCR

382

(3)

International Business.

Management, Organizational Behavior

ORGB

380

(3)

Cross Cultural Management.

Management Policy

MGPO

435

(3)

The Origins of Capitalism.

MGPO

438

(3)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

MGPO

440

(3)

Strategies for Sustainability.

MGPO

469

(3)

Managing Globalization.

MGPO

475

(3)

Strategies for Developing Countries.

MSUS

402

(3)

Systems Thinking and Sustainability.

Nutrition

NUTR

501

(3)

Nutrition in Developing Countries.

Political Science

POLI

319

(3)

Politics of Latin America.

POLI

322

(3)

Political Change in South Asia.

POLI

324

(3)

Developing Areas/Africa.

POLI

338

(3)

Developing Areas/Topics 1.

POLI

340

(3)

Developing Areas/Middle East.

POLI

341

(3)

Foreign Policy: The Middle East.

POLI

345

(3)

International Organizations.

POLI

347

(3)

Arab-Israel Conflict, Crisis, Peace.

POLI

349

(3)

Foreign Policy: Asia.

POLI

350

(3)

Global Environmental Politics.

POLI

352

(3)

International Policy/Foreign Policy: Africa.

POLI

353

(3)

Politics of the International Refugee Regime.

POLI

359

(3)

Topics in International Politics 1.

POLI

369

(3)

Politics of Southeast Asia.

POLI

372

(3)

Indigenous Peoples and the Canadian State.

POLI

380

(3)

Contemporary Chinese Politics.

POLI

381

(3)

Politics in Japan and South Korea.

POLI

422

(3)

Developing Areas/Topics 2.

POLI

423

(3)

Politics of Ethno-Nationalism.

POLI

435

(3)

Identity and Inequality.

POLI

441

(3)

IPE: Trade.

POLI

442

(3)

International Relations of Ethnic Conflict.

POLI

445

(3)

International Political Economy: Monetary Relations.

POLI

450

(3)

Peacebuilding.

POLI

473

(3)

Democracy and the Market.

POLI

474

(3)

Inequality and Development.

POLI

476

(3)

Religion and Politics.

POLI

480

(3)

Contentious Politics.

Religious Studies

RELG

331

(3)

Religion and Globalization.

RELG

370

(3)

Religion and Human Rights.

RELG

371

(3)

Ethics of Violence/Non-Violence.

RELG

375

(3)

Religion, Politics and Society.

Sociology

SOCI

234

(3)

Population and Society.

SOCI

265

(3)

War, States and Social Change.

SOCI

307

(3)

Globalization.

SOCI

309

(3)

Health and Illness.

SOCI

365

(3)

Health and Development.

SOCI

370

(3)

Sociology: Gender and Development.

SOCI

446

(3)

Colonialism and Society.

SOCI

513

(3)

Social Aspects HIV/AIDS in Africa.

SOCI

519

(3)

Gender and Globalization.

SOCI

520

(3)

Migration and Immigrant Groups.

SOCI

550

(3)

Developing Societies.

SOCI

555

(3)

Comparative Historical Sociology.

Social Work

SWRK

400

(3)

Policy and Practice for Refugees.

International Development Studies

INTD

350

(3)

Culture and Development.

INTD

352

(3)

Disasters and Development .

INTD

354

(3)

Civil Society and Development .

INTD

360

(3)

Environmental Challenges in Development.

INTD

397

(3)

Topics in International Development.

INTD

490

(3)

Development Research Project.

INTD

491

(3)

Honours Thesis.

INTD

492

(6)

Honours Thesis with Field Research.

INTD

497

(3)

Advanced Topics in International Development.

INTD

499

(3)

Internship: International Development Studies.

INTD

597

(3)

Seminar in International Development.

Methods (6 Credits)

6 credits from the following:*

* When selecting their Methods courses, students must consult with the IDS Adviser. They must also consult with the most recent Faculty of Arts policy on course overlap: https://www.mcgill.ca/study/faculties/arts/undergraduate/ug_arts_course_...

Anthropology

ANTH

358

(3)

The Process of Anthropological Research.

Economics

ECON

227D1

(3)

Economic Statistics.

ECON

227D2

(3)

Economic Statistics.

International Development Studies

INTD

356

(3)

Quantitative Methods for Development .

INTD

358

(3)

Ethnographic Approaches to Development .

Political Science

POLI

210

(3)

Political Science Research Methods.

POLI

461

(3)

Advanced Quantitative Political Science.

Sociology

SOCI

350

(3)

Statistics in Social Research.

SOCI

461

(3)

Quantitative Data Analysis.

SOCI

477

(3)

Qualitative Methods in Sociology.

 

FAQ’s Joint Honours 36 credits:

What is the difference between the old and the new IDS program, in summary?

    • Credit amounts are the same, the old program and new are still 36 credits. CGPA and Program GPA minimums are maintained.

The key differences are the following:

      • ECON 314 is no longer required, it can be taken as an optional Thematic complimentary course.
      • INTD 497 has been replaced by INTD 498, an Honours level seminar. Joint Honours students can take INTD 497 to count as one of their thematic courses.
      • The Introductory Complimentary courses have been expanded to include more options, and have been separated into two General Introductory categories:
        • Culture, Populations and Development
        • Politics, Society and Development
      • We have removed the option to count Language courses. Language credits will no longer be counted in the new IDS Joint Honours program.
      • Streams have been removed and condensed into one large Thematic category, with a fixed amount of credits to be taken – 15 credits. Allowing for more flexibility and enabling students to create purposeful themes aligning with their research interests.
      • We are now requiring a Methods requirement – 6 credits. As much as possible, we want you to pursue our own INTD options.
      • We require students to take a minimum of 12 credits within INTD course options. We have on offer many INTD courses at the 300 level.
      • Level rules are slightly different – 18 credits at the 300 level or above, and of these 9 credits must be at the 400 level or above.

What are methods courses?

Methods courses teach students procedures on how to collect, compile, scrutinize, analyze re-searchable empirical data. The methods course should allow the student to deepen their understanding of strengths and challenges within the chosen approach on a general level. The methods course will enable students to understand the data produced in large scale research project and determine outcomes, objectives, and successes/failures.

Within the thematic course options, do I need to create my own theme of course options?

    • As much as possible, and within the constraints of the course offerings from units we do not control, we advise students to pursue courses of interest and within a general theme. In order to create a coherent theme of study, allow for a focus to be created. For example: a student interested in environmental challenges relevant to development, would be more inclined to pursue courses in ANTH, GEOG, AGRI, AGEC and ECON.
    • The condensing and merging of the stream courses, within a large Thematic section will allow students to create sub-themes tailored to their particular interests.

NOTE: Language course credits can still be taken by the student within their degree constraints, as electives or you can pursue one of the many Language Minors.

*A joint Honours combination is required in order to pursue the joint Honours option in IDS.

    Old IDS program - Before Fall 2021 (Streams)

    Students that have been admitted to McGill in the Faculty of Arts before Fall 2021 have the option of pursuing the Old IDS program - (Streams); or to pursue the New IDS program effective Fall 2021. 

    • All Major and Honours Students in the Old IDS program  must choose between one of the following streams.
    • If pursuing the Old program, refer to the eCalendar for Program rules of the year that you were admitted into McGill
    • Students interested in Management course options listed in the IDS program, must be aware of the credit limitations in place for Arts students taking courses outside of the Faculties of Arts and Science. To consult this policy: https://www.mcgill.ca/study/2020-2021/faculties/arts/undergraduate/ug_arts_course_reqs

    2020-2021 eCalendar - this site is showing incorrect information, so click on the pdf. version in the YELLOW BOX on this site for correct information.

    2018-2019 eCalendar

    2017-2018 eCalendar

    2016-2017eCalendar

    Stream 1: Economic Development and Living Standards

    Experience has shown that development requires economic growth and is shaped by the distribution of economic resources. At the same time, the globalized economy has created new opportunities and new challenges for sustained growth. Courses in this stream revolve around the factors contributing to sustained economic growth, the trade-offs associated with different ways of achieving it, and the distributional issues development inevitably raises. More generally, this stream is also concerned with understanding what "development" actually entails in different contexts.

    Stream 2: States and Governance

    The courses in this stream focus on how political institutions shape developmental processes. Some courses analyze states and recognize how some promote development by providing diverse developmental goods while others impede development by preying on their peoples. Other courses focus on regimes and consider how political rights and participation, or their absences, affect developmental processes. Finally, several courses consider factors that make possible effective states and regimes.

    Stream 3: Culture and Society

    The courses in this stream focus on how the social structures, history, and culture of populations affect developmental processes. Associations, class, gender, religion, race, and ethnicity, for example, all shape development in multiple and diverse ways. Moreover, present developmental processes oftentimes cannot be adequately understood without considering history. Culture, in turn, is increasingly recognized within development studies as both a determinant and a constitutive element of development. In exploring all three, the courses in this stream provide important insight into the complex and varied relationship between social context and development.

    Stream 4: Environment and Agricultural Resources

    Within development studies, the environment has long been recognized as a vital determinant of development. More recently, many scholars have changed their environmental focus to emphasize sustainability. The courses in this stream recognize both: some courses consider how the environment can be exploited to promote human well-being while others consider how the environment must be respected to render development sustainable. Together, they highlight the delicate balance that must be attained between humans and their environments to make possible sustainable livelihoods.

    FAQ on the OLD IDS Programs (Streams)

    1. Do I need to follow one stream?
      • Yes - for the Major, Honours and Jt Honours programs. Not the IDS minor.
    2. I am pursuing a Major or Minor in Econ as well as IDS, what do I do for ECON 208 which is required in the IDS program?
      • If you are pursuing a Major in ECON and a program in IDS, you are not permitted to take ECON 208, unless you took this during a Freshman year. In which case, you will simply replace the credits for ECON 208 in the IDS program with another IDS course, of your choice chosen from the Complimentary course lists.
      • If you are pursuing a non-expandable Minor in Econ, you should take ECON 208 towards your ECON Minor program, and then replace the credits for ECON 208 in your IDS program with another IDS course, of your choice, chosen from the Complimentary course lists.
    3. How come I cannot get into the MGCR/MGMT courses?
      • The Faculty of Management controls enrolment in those courses. They typically assign seat restrictions in their courses. Their priority is to allow MGMT students access in their courses before they allow NON-MGMT students into their courses. They lift the restrictions the last week of Add/Drop of the term you are intending to take the course. 
      • We would advise you to keep trying to get a spot in the course. If you are unable, there are PLENTY of other IDS courses you can take.
    4. What is INTD 497?
      • INTD 497 - Advanced Topics in International Development is a lecture course, required for IDS Majors, Honours and Jt Honours students in the OLD IDS program. The course will have a specific topic assigned to it. Students will be expected to write a large research paper, and produce a group/solo presentation in class. Participation will be required in this capstone course.
      • It is required in the NEW IDS program - effective Fall 2021 as well.
    5. What are the differences between INTD 499, 490, 491, 492 (Project Courses)?
      • INTD 499 - This course should be considered if the student has secured an Internship experience over the summer months, relevant to IDS and has a minimum CGPA of 3.30. Students are expected to find a supervisor to work with to supervise the project which will be written the term following the Internship experience. A 20 page paper is expected. This course can count as a Complimentary course in the IDS programs.
      • INTD 490 - This course should be considered for Majors or Minors who are interested in pursuing an independent project paper. Students are expected to produce a large research paper, literature review, comparative analysis on a subject relevant to IDS. Secondary research sources should be used to produce a paper not exceeding 40 double spaced pages. A supervisor must be found by the student in order to supervise the project and grade it.
      • INTD 491 - This course should be considered for Jt Honours or Honours students who are interested in pursuing an independent project paper. Students are expected to produce a large research paper, literature review, comparative analysis on a subject relevant to IDS. Secondary research sources should be used to produce a paper not exceeding 40 double spaced pages. A supervisor must be found by the student in order to supervise the project and grade it.
      • INTD 492 - This course should be considered for Jt Honours or Honours students who are interested in pursuing an independent project paper. Students are expected in this course to incorporate an internship/volunteer/work experience which has produced some primary research into a large research paper, literature review, comparative analysis on a subject relevant to IDS. This course is worth 6 credits and as such the paper is expected to be between 40 - 60 double spaced pages. A supervisor must be found by the student in order to supervise the project and grade it. Students have the option to take this course over one term, or to span it over two terms. 
    • NOTE: All project courses require a minimum CGPA of 3.30 and applications forms found on our website.

    New IDS Program Effective 2021

    1. I was admitted into the Faculty of Arts prior to Fall 2021, do I need to follow the new program?
      • No. No student admitted prior to Fall 2021 is obliged to follow the new program.
      • If you have been pursuing the Old program (Streams) and are continuing to do so, refer to program structure in the eCalendar of the year that you were admitted into McGill.
      • Students choosing to remain in the Old program are permitted this due to the "grandfather clause", which allows you the option.
      • Students admitted in the Fall 2021 year MUST follow the new IDS program- effective Fall 2021.
    2. I was admitted prior to Fall 2021, but I am choosing to pursue the New IDS program, with no Streams – effective Fall 2021, can I follow the new program even though its not Fall 2021 yet?
      • Yes. You can start following the New IDS program prior to Fall 2021.
      • There are some key differences in the Old vs New. By publishing the New program earlier, this will allow CURRENT students to study the differences and make changes (if necessary) prior to Fall 2021.
    3. What are the KEY differences for the overall IDS programs?
      • We removed the Streams. Condensed all the Stream courses into one large Thematic Category. See individual Program (Major, Honours, Jt Honours, Minor) for more detailed FAQ’s.
      • We REMOVED ECON 314 from the Required courses for the IDS Major, Honours and Jt Honours programs. The course can still be taken, however it is no longer required.
      • We ADDED a section of Methods Courses. See individual Program (Major, Honours, Jt Honours, Minor) for more detailed FAQ’s and how many credits of Methods courses students must take in each program.
      • We expanded the Introductory Complimentary course options – and separated them into two Main categories:
        1. Cultures, Populations and Development
        2. Politics Society and Development
    4. What are Methods courses?
      • Methods courses teach students procedures on how to collect, compile, scrutinize, analyze re-searchable empirical data. The methods course should allow the student to deepen their understanding of strengths and challenges within the chosen approach on a general level. The methods course will enable students to understand the data produced in large scale research project and determine outcomes, objectives, and successes/failures.
    5. Where do I declare that I want to stay in the Old (Streams) program or follow the New program?
      • Minerva does not have a feature that allows this. The student must keep track and let the Advisor know which program they are following. Email ids [at] mcgill.ca
    6. Who can I see for advising?
    7. Why did you change the IDS program?
      • Extensive year long consultations with Academics and students have been on-going since 2015. Various town hall student reports as well as Academic Committee reports yielded considerable constraints/issues with the old program. 
      • Through these processes ISID was able to:
        1. offer MANY INTD 300 level options
        2. build in flexibility by removing the Streams, condensing and expanding the courses into one large Thematic section
        3. provide necessary and practical Methodology courses
    8. Is there a deadline on when I need to decide to stay in the old program or join the new program?
      • Yes and No – Students will need to continue to pursue courses in the subsequent terms, and deciding on which program to follow will affect this; therefore it is in your best interest to make your decision as soon as possible.
    9. Will there be more course offerings in INTD courses?
      • Yes. The 2020-2021 academic year is a historic one for the IDS program. We have never offered MORE INTD courses than we are offering this year.
      • ISID plans on continuing these course offerings. This allows IDS students to pursue INTD courses designed specifically for the Interdisciplinary nature of the IDS program, while also allowing students to pursue discipline focused development relevant classes as well (ex. Any of the POLI, SOCI, GEOG etc)
    10. Why did you remove the Language credits from the Honours and Joint Honours program?
      • Language courses posed certain difficulties due to their level, credit amounts and ability for our students to secure spots in courses. They are not under the control of the ISID offices hence students in our program would not have priority in them.
      • Students are still encouraged to pursue languages by taking them as electives or pursuing one of the Language programs.
    11. What’s the difference between INTD 497 and INTD 498?
      • INTD 498 – Honours Seminar in International Development is required for Joint Honours and Honours students. It is considered a seminar course. Honours and Joint Honours students are permitted to take INTD 497 as a Complimentary Thematic course.
      • INTD 497 – Advanced Topics in International Development is required for Majors. Students are now permitted to take multiple sections of 497 as long as the topic is different. It is considered a lecture course.
    12. Why isn’t the eCalendar of 2020-2021 showing the same information as the ISID site?
      • The updates to the 2020-2021 eCalendar were supposed to be made live the first week of October. The information on this site is completely wrong. There is a ‘glitch’ in the system which the IT department is working on.
      • For the MOST UP-TO-DATE and ACCURATE IDS PROGRAM information, please refer to the ISID site: https://www.mcgill.ca/isid/undergraduate/intd
    13. Will this make it easier to pursue an Exchange or Study away experience?
      • No. It was always encouraged and relatively ‘easy’ to pursue an Exchange or Study Away experience. Transfer credits were never determined on Stream theme. Within the new program, there is even more flexibility in course offerings, allowing students pursuing 'away' experiences even more flexibility.
    14. How come I cannot get into the MGCR/MGMT courses?
      • The Faculty of Management controls enrolment in those courses. They typically assign seat restrictions in their courses. Their priority is to allow MGMT students access in their courses before they allow NON-MGMT students into their courses. They lift the restrictions the last week of Add/Drop of the term you are intending to take the course.
      • We would advise you to keep trying to get a spot in the course. If you are unable, there are PLENTY of other IDS courses you can take.
    15. I am pursuing a Major or Minor in Econ as well as IDS, what do I do for ECON 208 which is required in the IDS program?
      • If you are pursuing a Major in ECON and a program in IDS, you are not permitted to take ECON 208, unless you took this during a Freshman year. In which case, you will simply replace the credits for ECON 208 in the IDS program with another IDS course, of your choice chosen from the Complimentary course lists.
      • If you are pursuing a non-expandable Minor in Econ, you should take ECON 208 towards your ECON Minor program, and then replace the credits for ECON 208 in your IDS program with another IDS course, of your choice, chosen from the Complimentary course lists.
      • If you are a double major or Jt Honours with ECON, you will have to take the year long version ECON 230D1 and D2, or ECON 250D1 and D2, therefore cannot take ECON 208. In which case you replace the credits for ECON 208 in your IDS program with another IDS course, of your choice, chosen from the Complimentary course lists.
    16. What are the differences between INTD 499, 490, 491, 492 (Project Courses)?
      • INTD 499 - This course should be considered if the student has secured an Internship experience over the summer months, relevant to IDS and has a minimum CGPA of 3.30. Students are expected to find a supervisor to work with to supervise the project which will be written the term following the Internship experience. A 20 page paper is expected. This course can count as a Complimentary Thematic course in the IDS programs.
      • INTD 490 - This course should be considered for Majors or Minors who are interested in pursuing an independent project paper. Students are expected to produce a large research paper, literature review, comparative analysis on a subject relevant to IDS. Secondary research sources should be used to produce a paper not exceeding 40 double spaced pages. A supervisor must be found by the student in order to supervise the project and grade it. This course can count as a Complimentary Thematic course in the IDS programs.
      • INTD 491 - This course should be considered for Jt Honours or Honours students who are interested in pursuing an independent project paper. Students are expected to produce a large research paper, literature review, comparative analysis on a subject relevant to IDS. Secondary research sources should be used to produce a paper not exceeding 40 double spaced pages. A supervisor must be found by the student in order to supervise the project and grade it. This course can count as a Complimentary Thematic course in the IDS programs.
      • INTD 492 - This course should be considered for Jt Honours or Honours students who are interested in pursuing an independent project paper. Students are expected in this course to incorporate an internship/volunteer/work experience which has produced some primary research into a large research paper, literature review, comparative analysis on a subject relevant to IDS. This course is worth 6 credits and as such the paper is expected to be between 40 - 60 double spaced pages. A supervisor must be found by the student in order to supervise the project and grade it. Students have the option to take this course over one term, or to span it over two terms. This course can count as a Complimentary Thematic course in the IDS programs.
    • NOTE: All project courses require a minimum CGPA of 3.30 and students must secure a supervisor. Applications forms found on our website. Permits will only be granted once a completed application form is submitted to the ISID offices - submit to ids [at] mcgill.ca

     

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