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Thanks SPF for supporting the Museum!

This summer the McGill Sustainability Projects Fund (SPF) turned ten years old and it marked the occasion by giving the 130 year old Redpath Museum some funding help. Thanks SPF for subsidizing our new outreach project to create a "Museum in a Box" and for help to buy photography equipment so that we could create virtual StoryMap tours such as the McGill Tree Tour and the McGill Stones and fossils tour.

Published: 30 Aug 2020

Museum and Dawson family - news from our connections

The Dawson family and McGill have a long and storied connection. Sir John William Dawson, founder of the Museum in 1882 and Principal of McGill for 38 years died in 1899. His great grandaughter Kathleen Godfrey, graduated in 2019 with Masters in Anthropology. You can read about her conservation and social justice work here. On August 10, 2020, Kathleen's grandmother, Joan Harrington, died at the age of 101.

Published: 13 Aug 2020

New species of ancient swimming reptile discovered by Museum student

The Hauffiopteryx altera, a new species of Ichthyosaur discovered by a McGill student Dirley Cortés, a PhD candidate in paleontology with Dr. Hans Larsson, Director of the Redpath Museum, has been described iPalaeontologia Electronica, 23(2):a30. DOI: https://doi.org/10.26879/937 here.

Published: 13 Aug 2020

Rock On! Erin Gibbons

The Redpath Museum Society Vice President External, Erin Gibbons, has won the prestigious Vanier Scholarship. 

Published: 28 Jun 2020

Kyle Henderson, PhD Candidate receives 2020 Hugh C. Morris Fellowship

Congratulations to Kyle ! Recipient of 1 of 2 Hugh C. Morris Experiential Learning Fellowship. Administered by the Kimberley Foundation, the fellowship supports a student-designed self-guided experiential program related to studies in earth sciences, climate change, sustainability, or the social impact, social sciences or design sciences concern with earth, sustainability of environmental issues.

Published: 26 Mar 2020

New technique for measuring greenhouse gas production from thawing permafrost

A research team led by McGill University geochemist Peter Douglas has used a new method for measuring the rate at which methane is produced by microbes breaking down thawing permafrost. “There is a lot of concern about methane being released from permafrost, but we don’t know how available carbon that has been frozen for thousands of years is to microbes,” says Douglas, an assistant professor in McGill’s Department of Earth and Pl

Published: 26 Mar 2020
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