It’s no secret that the internet and social media fuel rampant spread of misinformation in many areas of life. A collective of researchers, including Catherine Scott, Postdoctoral Fellow in McGill University’s Lyman Lab, have explored this phenomenon as it applies to news about spiders. The verdict? Don’t blindly trust anything you read online about these eight-legged arthropods—or anything else for that matter—and always consider the source.

Classified as: mcgill research, Lyman Lab, spiders, misinformation, Catherine Scott
Published on: 1 Sep 2022

The Neuro joins two other McGill-affiliated organizations in signing The Declaration on Research Assessment

The Neuro (Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital) has joined the Douglas Research Centre (DRC) and the Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform (CONP) in signing the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), an agreement that seeks to change how scholarly research contributions are valued in hiring, promotion, and funding decisions.

Classified as: Declaration on Research Assessment, Neuro, Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform, open science, DORA
Published on: 10 Aug 2022

Many mammal species living in cold climates tend to have large bodies and short limbs to reduce heat loss – a general pattern known as Bergmann’s rule. However, bats are the exception to the rule, displaying small body sizes in both hot and cold regions. A McGill-led team of researchers is shedding light on this long-standing debate over bats’ body sizes and focus on why bats are seemingly non-conforming to ecogeographical patterns found in other mammals. Their findings offer a new method for investigating complex macroecology across bat species.

Classified as: mcgill research, Department of Biology, bats, Thermoregulation, Sustainability, Juan G Rubalcaba, morphology, evolution, flight cost
Published on: 21 Jul 2022

Sustainable agricultural practices require considerable investments, and smallholder famers may not realize gains for years. Without secure land tenure, they lack incentive to invest in long-term benefits. Instead, many opt to use the land as intensively as possible each year since they have no guarantee for the future. This is just one example of how land tenure security intersects with sustainable development, a relationship explored in-depth in a recent book co-edited by Brian Robinson, an associate professor in the Department of Geography at McGill University.

Published on: 18 Jul 2022

In Policy Magazine's new Emerging Voices series by students, five Max Bell School MPPs were invited to write articles on issues important to them.

The fourth article is "A Plea for Greening Canada’s Housing Policy" about the housing and climate change crises wreaking havoc on the Canadian economy by Nimmi Hamid.

Classified as: mpp perspectives, climate change, public policy
Published on: 29 Jun 2022

In Policy Magazine's new Emerging Voices series by students, five Max Bell School MPPs were invited to write articles on issues important to them.

The fourth article is "Canada’s CANnabis, or CAN’Tabis ?" about Canada’s cannabis legalization review that was due in October 2021 - but it has yet to commence.

Nandini Paliwal is a master’s student at Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University and is a civil servant from India, currently on sabbatical.

Read the article here.

Classified as: mpp perspectives, cannabis, Cannabis research, public policy
Published on: 28 Jun 2022

In Policy Magazine's new Emerging Voices series by students, five Max Bell School MPPs were invited to write articles on issues important to them.

The third article is "Canada’s Huawei decision: Next Steps" by Sugandha Gupta. Gupta is a Master’s student at the Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University and holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Economics from the University of Delhi, as well as a Master of Science in Economics from the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research.

Classified as: max bell school of public policy, max bell school, Sugandha Gupta, Policy Magazine, Canadian Politics, Huawei, mpp perspectives, MPP research
Published on: 23 Jun 2022

Asked to list the most earthquake prone countries, few people would earmark Canada. Yet, in 2021, Natural Resources Canada identified 46 earthquakes, which registered between 1.8 and 5.3 magnitude and to date, 26 earthquakes have occurred in 2022. Damaging earthquakes are surprisingly common in the Western Quebec Seismic Zone, which encloses the Ottawa Valley from Montreal to Témiscamingue as well as the Laurentians. The question is not if but when a major quake will hit one of Canada’s major urban centres, an event that poses risks to human life and infrastructure.

Classified as: mcgill research, Research and Innovation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), NSERC
Published on: 23 Jun 2022

In Policy Magazine's new Emerging Voices series by students, five Max Bell School MPPs were invited to write articles on issues important to them.

The first article is "No Time to Waste in Canada’s Tryst with Cyber Warfare" by Naveen Kanwadia. Naveen Kanwadia is a master’s student at the Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University and prior to starting his graduate studies, was handling public policy and regulatory affairs for The Walt Disney Co. in Asia.

Classified as: mpp perspectives, MPP students, MPP research, Canada, cyber security
Published on: 17 Jun 2022

In Policy Magazine's new Emerging Voices series by students, five Max Bell School MPPs were invited to write articles on issues important to them.

The first article is "A Country Covered by Water, but not by Insurance" by Caroline Merner. Caroline Merner is a Master’s student at the Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sustainability and International Development from Dalhousie University. Caroline co-founded Youth4Nature (formerly Climate Guides), a non-profit organization mobilizing youth for nature and climate action.

Classified as: mpp perspectives, MPP students, MPP research, Canada, climate change, environmental change, natural disaster
Published on: 17 Jun 2022

Profs. Shelley Clark and Sam Harper co-edited a double volume Russell Sage Foundation issue on "Growing Up Rural: How Place Shapes Outcomes". Please use the following links to read more : Issue 3 and Issue 4.

It also contains an intro article "Growing Up in Rural America" by Shelley Clark, Sam Harper and Bruce Weber.

Classified as: Centre on Population Dynamics, publications, population studies
Category:
Published on: 6 Jun 2022

Montreal-based centre unites strengths of McGill University, ÉTS, Mila, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, and CentraleSupélec

Classified as: international, artificial intelligence (AI)
Published on: 26 Apr 2022

April 2022 | The American Academy of Art and Sciences' project on Rethinking the Humanitarian Health Response to Violent Conflict has just released International Cooperation Failures in the Face of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Learning from Past Efforts to Address Common Threats.

Classified as: Jennifer Welsh, covid-19, conflict, United Nations, max bell school of public policy, max bell school
Category:
Published on: 24 Apr 2022

As a member of the pro bono legal team supporting Médecins du Monde (Doctors of the World) Canada, Max Bell School professor Pearl Eliadis is pushing the Quebec government to extend public health care to women in Quebec whose immigration status is precarious and who need reproductive and sexual health services. Recently, Eliadis contributed to a brief which was submitted to the Government of Quebec.

Classified as: max bell school, max bell school of public policy, Pearl Eliadis, medecins du mode, doctors of the world
Category:
Published on: 23 Apr 2022

Together with Dr. Birgit Frauscher, Bernhardt co-directs The Neuro’s new Centre of Excellence in Epilepsy

Since joining The Neuro in 2016, Boris Bernhardt, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery, has published pioneering research on the organization and development of the healthy brain. His achievements have been recognized this week by the Canadian Association for Neuroscience, who have awarded him the 2022 New Investigator Award.

Classified as: Boris Bernhardt, epilepsy, autism, Neuro
Published on: 12 Apr 2022

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