Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS)

Among the most extreme planets discovered beyond the edges of our solar system are lava planets: fiery hot worlds that circle so close to their host star that some regions are likely oceans of molten lava. According to scientists from McGill University, York University, and the Indian Institute of Science Education, the atmosphere and weather cycle of at least one such exoplanet is even stranger, featuring the evaporation and precipitation of rocks, supersonic winds that rage over 5000 km/hr, and a magma ocean 100 km deep.

Classified as: Lava, planet, exoplanet, K2-141b, supersonic winds, rock, rain, Giang Nguyen, nicolas cowan
Published on: 3 Nov 2020

This summer the McGill Sustainability Projects Fund (SPF) turned ten years old and it marked the occasion by giving the 130 year old Redpath Museum some funding help. Thanks SPF for subsidizing our new outreach project to create a "Museum in a Box" and for help to buy photography equipment so that we could create virtual StoryMap tours such as the McGill Tree Tour and the McGill Stones and fossils tour.

Check here for the launch of both these virtual tours for Homecoming McGill at the end of September.  

Classified as: Public talks, STEM Outreach, Public Outreach talk, Cutting edge lecture, Homecoming
Published on: 30 Aug 2020

The Dawson family and McGill have a long and storied connection. Sir John William Dawson, founder of the Museum in 1882 and Principal of McGill for 38 years died in 1899. His great grandaughter Kathleen Godfrey, graduated in 2019 with Masters in Anthropology. You can read about her conservation and social justice work here. On August 10, 2020, Kathleen's grandmother, Joan Harrington, died at the age of 101.

Classified as: Dawson, Harrington, McGill history
Published on: 13 Aug 2020

The Hauffiopteryx altera, a new species of Ichthyosaur discovered by a McGill student Dirley Cortés, a PhD candidate in paleontology with Dr. Hans Larsson, Director of the Redpath Museum, has been described iPalaeontologia Electronica, 23(2):a30.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.26879/937 here.

Classified as: fossil reptiles, ichthyosaurs, Hans Larsson
Published on: 13 Aug 2020

The Redpath Museum Society Vice President External, Erin Gibbons, has won the prestigious Vanier Scholarship. 

Classified as: STEM Outreach
Published on: 28 Jun 2020

The McGill 24 Seeds of Change project to create a Virtual Fossil and Dinosaur kit closed at midnight on May 26, 2020, and raised $2,069.78 from 9 donations (including $290 in McGill24 Matching Funds).

Classified as: STEM Outreach
Published on: 27 May 2020

Thanks very much for your donations to the Museum during McGill24 to create a:

Virtual Fossil and Dinosaur Teaching Kit

This campaign finishes on May 25, 2020. With your continued support we can develop and create more e- resources for teachers and children everywhere to learn about the amazing world of Mesozoic dinosaurs, Devonian flora and ancient Ordovician sea life. All from the Redpath Museum!

Classified as: Public Outreach, STEM Outreach
Published on: 22 May 2020

Two people connected to the Redpath Museum died on April 8, 2020: Robert “Bob” Lynn Carroll, vertebrate paleontologist, aged 81 years old and Joan Clark, patent lawyer, aged 90 years old.

Classified as: Public Outreach
Published on: 14 Apr 2020

A new study finds volcanic activity played a direct role in triggering extreme climate change at the end of the Triassic period 201 million year ago, wiping out almost half of all existing species. The amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere from these volcanic eruptions is comparable to the amount of CO2 expected to be produced by all human activity in the 21st century.

Classified as: Don Baker, volcanic activity, co2, carbon dioxide, emissions, climate change, Sustainability
Published on: 14 Apr 2020

Congratulations to Kyle ! Recipient of 1 of 2 Hugh C. Morris Experiential Learning Fellowship. Administered by the Kimberley Foundation, the fellowship supports a student-designed self-guided experiential program related to studies in earth sciences, climate change, sustainability, or the social impact, social sciences or design sciences concern with earth, sustainability of environmental issues.

Classified as: Graduate Students, geology, fellowship
Published on: 26 Mar 2020

A research team led by McGill University geochemist Peter Douglas has used a new method for measuring the rate at which methane is produced by microbes breaking down thawing permafrost. “There is a lot of concern about methane being released from permafrost, but we don’t know how available carbon that has been frozen for thousands of years is to microbes,” says Douglas, an assistant professor in McGill’s Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.

Classified as: geochemistry, geology, permafrost, Greenhouse gases, Arctic
Published on: 26 Mar 2020

A research team led by McGill University geochemist Peter Douglas has used a new method for measuring the rate at which methane is produced by microbes breaking down thawing permafrost. The breakthrough could lead to an improvement in our ability to predict future releases of the potent greenhouse gas as long‑frozen layers of soil begin to thaw.

Published on: 11 Mar 2020

Start & End Date: May 1, 2020 – April 30, 2021

Hourly Wage: $25.00 per hour + 4% benefits, paid bi-weekly

Hours/Week: 21 hours per week

Deadline to Apply: March 24, 2020

Classified as: STEM Outreach, climate change
Published on: 25 Feb 2020

In November this year, around 400 people gathered at the McGill Faculty Club for the Faculty of Science’s annual scholarship reception. The evening’s celebration was an opportunity for donors to the Faculty to meet the students who have benefitted from their generous support.

Confidence-building opportunities

Addressing the guests, Joëlle Begin Miolan, recipient of a McGill Alumni & Friends Undergraduate Research Award, described the opportunity to do research as a defining moment for her self-belief as an undergraduate physics student.

Classified as: Bob Wares
Published on: 21 Nov 2019

By Anna Hayden

(This blogpost is the second in a series that explores the Earth and Planetary Sciences Learning Community pilot project.)

Hand lens, compass, rock hammer – tools of the trade of a geologist. But what’s in our writing toolkit? Is there a Swiss Army knife for writing? In fact, an Earth and Planetary Sciences Learning Community meeting focused on equipping its members with such a tool, the A.P.O.S. framework.

Published on: 24 Oct 2019

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