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New pill to cut chance of a stroke

Cholesterol sufferers could soon take a simple pill which keeps levels under control and protects them against heart disease or a stroke. The daily wonder pill has been hailed as a new fat buster by scientists. Experts found that people who took just two capsules packed with healthy bacteria every day not only had lower "bad" cholesterol but also of total cholesterol.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

McGill series lectures on diet, health and science

There's a sea of conflicting information out there about what we should be eating and not eating, about what's good for us and what isn't - and trying to navigate it often feels impossible. Four distinguished speakers with great expertise in the arena in which diet, health and science intersect will gather in Montreal next week for the eighth annual Lorne Trottier Public Science Symposium Series, hosted by McGill University's Office for Science & Society.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

The man or the platform?

(History professor Gil Troy): Mitt Romney and Barack Obama appear to agree about at least one thing on this tense Election Day: They are standing on mutually exclusive party platforms, offering Americans what Obama called “the clearest choice of any time in a generation.” The candidates – and their partisans – insist voters are deciding today between a country that will be prospering or bankrupt, with a foreign policy that is firm or flaccid, and with abortion either remaining legal or abruptly outlawed.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

Another nail-biting evening - but not much will change

(History professor Gil Troy): With many pollsters declaring today’s presidential election “too close to call,” Americans face the third of four nail-biting Election Days since 2000. Barack Obama’s decisive 2008 win now seems to be the 21st-century anomaly.

Read more at Globe and Mail

Published: 9 Nov 2012

It's time to rebalance our sectors and society

(Henry Mintzberg) Governments and corporations can't be relied upon to provide solutions to our biggest problems – instead we must look to ourselves. That we face serious problems – poverty amid plenty, the degradation of our physical, social, and economic environments, terrorism by fanatic cells and rogue states, and so on – is clear. But how our established institutions – governments and businesses – deal with them, even when responsive and responsible, is not. We need another way.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

Newsmaker: Dr. Joe Schwarcz: You are what you eat

Dr. Joe Schwarcz talked to Paul Karwatsky about how what you eat will have an effect on your health. This will be the topic of the Lorne Trottier Pubic Science Symposium at the Centre Mont Royal. Drs. Walter Willett (chair of the Dept. of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health) and Jeffrey Blumberg (Tufts University) speak on Monday Nov. 12.
Scientist, food lover, and writer Harold McGee (On Food & Cooking) along with Jane Brody, the New York Times Personal Health columnist, speak on Nov. 13.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

Talking management: The power of making people laugh

Karl Moore of Desautels Faculty of Management talks with Peter McGraw, a professor of marketing at the University of Colorado, about the place of humour at work.

Read more at Globe and Mail

Published: 9 Nov 2012

Viagra makers stiffen as ruling threatens patent

The little blue pill that has enhanced sex lives the world over could face some market competition if the Supreme Court of Canada decides this week that Pfizer Canada Inc.'s patent on the erectile-dysfunction drug Viagra is invalid. The top court will issue a judgment Thursday on a challenge to Pfizer's Canadian patent by generic drug company Teva Canada Limited. If Teva is successful, the company could put a generic version of Viagra on the Canadian market immediately.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

How to reduce workplace gender segregation

Researchers have previously demonstrated that approximately half of the pay gap between men and women (women earn about 20% less) is due to women having a tendency to work in different occupations and industries than men, a phenomenon called “gender segregation.” But what causes this gender segregation? Wharton management professor Matthew Bidwell and Roxana Barbulescu, a management professor at McGill University in Montreal, decided to find out and what they uncovered is that negative employer behavior isn’t the only cause of gender segregation.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

Weather girl dreams

HuffPost College asked winners of the Undergraduate Awards - an international academic awards program that identifies top students across the globe through their innovative undergraduate research - to write an essay about the personal reasons and ambitions behind their research. Sophie Splawinski took top spot in the Agricultural & Environmental Sciences category with her paper “The role of anticyclones in replenishing surface cold air and modulating severe freezing rain event duration.” Last June Sophie completed her undergraduate studies in Atmospheric Sciences.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

Higher rates of C. Difficile detection for better tests

A sensitive diagnostic test implemented last year at the Royal Victoria Hospital is showing consistently higher rates of detection for a potentially fatal superbug than a test currently used at most Montreal hospitals, officials said Wednesday. At least one surgery patient has spoken to The Gazette about being sent home from the Royal Victoria Hospital last month as a preventive measure because of an outbreak of Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that can cause damage to the bowel and lead to severe diarrhea in people at risk.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

New director at the Neuro

Dr. Guy Rouleau, a clinician and neuroscientist who has studied the genetic causes of epilepsy, schizophrenia and other illnesses of the brain, has been appointed director of the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital. Rouleau, a professor of medicine at the Université de Montréal, takes his position at the Neuro on Jan.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

Melting in the Andes: Good bye glaciers

From the shade of an adobe house overlooking Peru's Santa River, Jimmy Melgarejo squints at the dual peaks of Mount Huascarán looming against a cloudless sky. “The snow keeps getting farther away,” says Melgarejo, a farmer worried about his livelihood. “It's moving up, little by little. When the snow disappears, there will be no water.” Throughout the Andes, millions of people voice the same concern as they watch climate change eat away at the mountain chain's icy mantle. But although everyone fears a water shortage, they do not know how quickly it will come or how severe it will be.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

Murrahs catch Canadian scholar's fancy

Haryana's 'black gold' has caught the fancy of a Canadian scholar. A PhD student of McGill University in Montreal, Sophie Llewelyn, is studying the Murrah-human relation in Haryana and the way it intensifies animal husbandry and dairy. Murrah buffaloes play a pivotal role for the cattle breeders in the state. And no wonder, Sophie, a student of anthropology, has titled her research 'Black gold: Changing animal husbandry practices in central Haryana'. The scholar is currently visiting rural families in Sampla region of Rohtak to delve deep into her subject.

Published: 9 Nov 2012

Corruption probe shakes Montreal, topples Mayor

Montrealers have long assumed a fair amount of dirty money sloshes through their city’s politics, but only lately are they learning just how bad things are. This week the mayor had to resign, a mayor of a neighboring town may soon follow him, and taxpayers don’t know whether to laugh or weep over the revelation of a safe so bulging with cash that a campaign fundraiser needed help shutting the door. […] Antonia Maioni, a political science professor at Montreal’s McGill University, said the investigation was having a powerful effect, positive and negative.

Published: 9 Nov 2012